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Thread: new terminology nib and polish vs sand and buff?

  1. #1

    Exclamation new terminology nib and polish vs sand and buff?

    Hasany one heard of this new terminology the insurance companys are using calling nib and polish vs PAYING body shops for sand and buff time?FONT="Arial Black"][/FON]

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernies repair
    Hasany one heard of this new terminology the insurance companys are using calling nib and polish vs PAYING body shops for sand and buff time?FONT="Arial Black"][/FON]
    That's a new one on me but I'd imagine that the terminology will probably allow them to knock time/$ off the bottom line.

  3. #3
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    nib and polish refers to just going around the new paint and scuffing the dirt nibs flat and then polishing the areas back to a shine.
    Sand and buff was sorta the same thing but it was sometimes refer as sanding the orange peel smooth and then buffing for a shiney mirror
    type finish.Nibbing only removes the high spots on the clear from dirt specks and leaves the orange peel the way you sprayed it.
    -Jeff
    Body&Paint 65 Dodge A/FX featured in
    Mopar Collectors Guide April/04 and
    Mopar Muscle June/05

    Body&Paint 69 1/2 A12 Sixpack SuperBee
    car #170 on SixPack/6BBL Registry
    http://www.homestead.com/sixpacksixbbl/registry.html

  4. #4

    Angry Where does the quality go...

    We already know what the terminology mean, what does the auto body industry going to do with the situation where the insurance companies are dictating how the car is to be repaired, to their satisfaction and cost criteria verses the customer's expectations.

    The point in this discussion is to point out the time necessaary to delivery an acceptable quality finish. The criteria is to deliver a repair which is acceptable to the customer and provide reasonable payment for your time spent providing the repair. Insurance companies are now specifying short cut to a accepatable industry standard job. Repair shops should be appropiately compensated for reasonsable time for this process. Currently, the rule has been 30% times the paint overall, now they want to short cut this final procedure to a lesser process, sacrificing quality.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2006
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    I can explain this for you guys, It is not "new" terminology, the insurance companies (or at least one for sure) is paying for de nib and polish on all vehicles to "de nib" the dirt nibs from the paint surface, this would be paid at up to .3 tenths per panel at the refinish rate in our market area (Texas) and if the vehicle has a "slick" finish" little to no factory orange peel, than Color sand and buff would be paid at 30% of base refinish time. I don't know any insurance company that would pay Color Sand and Buff on a Chevy Pickup truck unless that truck (or car) is a "custom" and has been repainted with a slick finish. I know in most areas the insurance companies have not been paying for de nib, only for color sand & buff, so this is a good thing that they are finally recognizing that we need this on all cars. I am not complaining.

  6. #6
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    There is also another way of looking at this situation. WE are supposed to be the professionals who SHOULD be able to spray a panel without excessive orange peel. If WE can't spray a panel without getting a sh*t load of orange peel in it then whose fault is it ? the customer ? (nope) The Insurance Co. (nope) the person painting the car ? (yup !). So why blame the insurance co. because they don't want to pay to repair a screw up the painter makes ?
    I don't wetsand and buff every job I do. and sometimes I "nib and buff" as needed. Sometimes I'll wetsand the panel and buff it to a spit shine, all depends on the how the paint went on and the car I'm painting. For me the hard part is in matching factory orange peel. Its easy to wetsand an buff a panel to high shine but if it makes the rest of the car look bad or doesn't match the texture of the paint on the other factory panels then the blame should go to the painter.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7T7
    I know in most areas the insurance companies have not been paying for de nib, only for color sand & buff, so this is a good thing that they are finally recognizing that we need this on all cars. I am not complaining.
    So what you're saying is that this insurance company ADDED money for this proceedure?:eek: Sheesh, I usually have to fight for every penny then they started to restrict the amount of paint materials even if the price was higher. Maybe where you're from they like giving money to the shops but around here it can be difficult to get the necessary labor to do the job properly.

  8. #8

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    The point is that the insurance companies are now trying NOT to pay for the "sand and buff" procedure which they already have been paying, this is from Connecticut. Now that the insurance companies have gone to the PPG training and are saying that they only have to provide "Nib and Polish" procedure, this cuts into the bottom line for the job... yes, we do have to scrape for every penny doing the job. I beleive that the insurance companies should continue to pay for the procedure and not keep changing the procedure criteria. It's hard enough to provide a quality job for the amount the insurance companies are paying.

  9. #9
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    is the shop theyre allowing a denib and polish to a pro shop for that company? and also do they have a spray booth?
    Only thing i cant think of...if its a pro shop...the insurance company is using you to save money intending you'll make it up with the volume of work they send to you.
    Also if you have a spray booth..maybe the adjuster was assuming you wouldnt need to wetsand and polish a car? I really have no idea just a thought.
    Me personally...Im an open air sprayer..but I keep a mint mint shop..probably cleaner than some of these guys spraybooths.
    Not to jinx my self or be cocky...but i dont rub about 90% of my work. It just comes out that good. The clear im currently using I got the nac of it...depending on the factory peel...i know how much to reduce it and i can get away with it just looking great...
    I mean im no butcher...if i get some dust nibs and the car has to be rubbed i do it..

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