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Thread: When jambing, will color adhere to small spots of bare metal?

  1. #1

    Cool When jambing, will color adhere to small spots of bare metal?

    Took my door jambs down to bare metal then covered with 2 coats epoxy followed by 2 coats of urethane primer. One dry, I scuffed them down with a 3M red pad. Probably got a little too aggressive and uncovered a couple of tiny bits of bare metal. Don't particularly want to reprime. Can I just shoot my color coat over this? Will it stick?

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  2. #2
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    I'm not some kind of expert painter, but I always use rattle can self etching primer on those first. I've so far never had a problem with it lifting, even the rustoleum is lacquer.

    I've also wiped the spots with etch and then a plain wet piece of towel, then primed the spots before basecoat. Be sure to blow it off with air before priming to be sure the water has fully evaporated.

    Basecoat does not adhere well to bare metal like primer does. I'm sure someone more qualified than myself will chime in here. I hope that helps you.

  3. #3

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    You need to put something over bare spots before base.
    I recommend a thinned down epoxy primer as a sealer,
    a light coat of that and you can paint right over it in an hour or less.

  4. #4

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by JCCLARK View Post
    You need to put something over bare spots before base.
    I recommend a thinned down epoxy primer as a sealer,
    a light coat of that and you can paint right over it in an hour or less.
    I guess I'll have to do that. I've got small bare spots in the trunk too that I'll be jambing.
    So.....a light coat of DTM epoxy followed by the color coat, with no scuffing of the epoxy within the recoat window, right?

  5. #5

    Default

    Yes, that's another advantage of epoxy, it has a long recoat window,
    some as many as 7 days.
    And it lays real smooth when reduced to a sealer coat.
    Check your brand tech. sheet for recommended reduction ratios.

  6. #6
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    Since I'm old school, and still have 1/2 gallon (maybe 1-1/2? gal sprayable) of lacquer filler primer left over from a long time ago, I use that as scratch filler after it dries for a day or so before applying the sealer.

    I've never used epoxy primer, mostly bc I hear it's deadly if you breathe it in. I do like the idea of sprayable body filler though! I'm used to doing stuff the hard way I guess, and lacquer primer does shrink a lot over time.

    (excuse the hijack)

  7. #7

    Default

    Lacquer primer is the worst primer to put over any bare metal, it
    is not made for bare metal, it soaks up moisture like a sponge
    and does not adhere very well.

  8. #8
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    uh-oh!

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joey Buttafucco Collision View Post
    uh-oh!
    I agree with JCCLARK, we stopped using lacquer primer several decades ago. Our biggest problem with it was showing surface irregularities as the top coat dried. If you've already used it in jambs it shouldn't be a big problem but I'd use better primer on the exterior surfaces.

  10. #10

    Default

    I remember back in the 1970's when I used lacquer for everything,
    I repaired several cars that I had worked on in the past only to find
    rust under that lacquer primer. that's how I learned to never wet
    sand lacquer primer, moisture goes right through.
    That stuff also continued to shrink for weeks.
    I still have lacquer primer, it makes a great guide coat.

  11. #11
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    Jun 2022
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    You are correct, even after letting it shrink under the sun for about 4-6 months, a few years later my perfectly straight bodywork began to show minor low spots. Thankfully, it's painted silver and not a dark color.

    I don't know if there was a such thing as self etching primer back around 2000, but I used "triple etch" on all the bare steel before priming or filling. I did notice sand scratch swelling if I remember correctly, but it got block sanded after it dried very well. The low spots didn't show up until after a few years.

    Next time I paint something that matters (not the dd), I'll use 2 part primer. Honestly, I never knew about the rust thing under lacquer primer. That's why I'm here...I want to learn. Everything I know is from personal experience. I was a mechanic by trade and have no formal education in auto body. But I can rebuild a motor or an older transmission!

    Excuse the long post.

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