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Thread: Hints, tips and tricks for interior painting?

  1. #1

    Question Hints, tips and tricks for interior painting?

    Getting ready to apply a flattened s/s urethane to the interior of a '65 Impala (100% disassembled). Was looking to see if there might be any insight beyond the standard practice mix and shoot to help produce a factory smooth finish requiring no post-application attention.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    Getting ready to apply a flattened s/s urethane to the interior of a '65 Impala (100% disassembled). Was looking to see if there might be any insight beyond the standard practice mix and shoot to help produce a factory smooth finish requiring no post-application attention.
    If it's a flat (no gloss) finish then once the paint is applied you're done, you can't make it any better after that. With a gloss finish you can always sand and polish to make it perfect but not with a flat finish. If you're using a "good" paint and a "good" gun you should get decent results as long as your application is even.

    If you do have a problem then your only cure will be to sand and reapply the paint.

    Since you're applying paint on the panels separately make sure the paint is mixed/stirred VERY well prior to each application or you could have a difference in the gloss from one panel to the next. The best mixing method is to use a paint shaker.


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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    Getting ready to apply a flattened s/s urethane to the interior of a '65 Impala (100% disassembled). Was looking to see if there might be any insight beyond the standard practice mix and shoot to help produce a factory smooth finish requiring no post-application attention.
    I'm not expert on old GMs, but some manufacturers have a texture on their interior finishes. If you're looking to get original, take notes on how it looks before you sand so you can replicate the original finish.

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    for me, the hardest part of doing interior stuff is getting even coverage in all the nooks and crannies. as soon as you start painting the air gets thick with overspray quickly and it gets tough to see what you're doing. i like to coat all the inside corners and hard to reach areas first, let the air clear, then go back and shoot the rest for even coverage.
    b marler

  5. #5

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    Much appreciate the heads-up guys!

    Sounds like it's pretty much standard mixing/painting practices. I had in my mind there might be a tweak with reduction such as slower or a tighter ratio.

    Luckily paint is standard finish of 0% and 60% gloss black, no texture.

    Yup, will be painting in a "semi"-stagnant air environment so allowing just a moment for the air to clear for visibility after corner/edge coats is a good thing to "try" and remember.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    Much appreciate the heads-up guys!

    Sounds like it's pretty much standard mixing/painting practices. I had in my mind there might be a tweak with reduction such as slower or a tighter ratio.

    Luckily paint is standard finish of 0% and 60% gloss black, no texture.

    Yup, will be painting in a "semi"-stagnant air environment so allowing just a moment for the air to clear for visibility after corner/edge coats is a good thing to "try" and remember.
    If you're using a hardened paint be sure to protect yourself properly. One dose of isocyanides in the paint could effect you for the rest of your life. When hardened paint hit the market our paint supplier stopped selling us paint until we got our supplied air system and spraying an interior is much more dangerous because the toxins are gathered around you.


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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    Much appreciate the heads-up guys!

    Sounds like it's pretty much standard mixing/painting practices. I had in my mind there might be a tweak with reduction such as slower or a tighter ratio.

    Luckily paint is standard finish of 0% and 60% gloss black, no texture.

    Yup, will be painting in a "semi"-stagnant air environment so allowing just a moment for the air to clear for visibility after corner/edge coats is a good thing to "try" and remember.
    i like to use slow reducer too, but it's certainly a judgement call. i like it because it buys me more time when i shoot over the nooks and crannies from the first pass for everything to melt together. with matte finish though, it's not really a problem.
    b marler

  8. #8

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    Appreciate the replies!

    @Len -- Will definitely heed your caution. In addition to PPE an effort will be made to improve ventilation. It's well directed as the last time I shot a proper paint job was back in the 80's with a Binks Model 7 shooting a candy apple vermilion in lacquer (HoK).

    @bmerler -- As you state -- Probably not a game-changer with the flat. Now that you've planted a seed though, the curiosity bug will probably have me squirting a comparison test. ;-)

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