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Thread: Heat shrinker question

  1. #1

    Default Heat shrinker question

    In using my English wheel to make a portion of a panel I have overworked an area and now have more of a raised area than I wanted.

    My question is : Can I use a shrinking disc on the overly raised area to flatten it some ?
    Thanks for helping me

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    I haven't had much luck with a shrink disk but it might work for that job. We use a stud welder with a shrink tip to shrink metal but it's a lot more expensive than a disk.


  3. #3
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    i don't have a stud welder, so i use my tig torch instead. same principle though, heat and cool a small area. it's amazing how effective it is. i do small groupings of spots, trying to be careful not to do too much at a time.
    b marler

  4. #4
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    From what you said and what I am envisioning I would say no. Shrinking discs are typically used in an area with very little raised defects about the size of a quarter or half dollar. They are meant for fine tuning the panel when a torch or shrinking tip might be an overkill. I have been using those discs for about a decade (both the 4" and 5") and find them extremely helpful when fabricating new panels, but they are only meant for fine tuning very small areas. In my estimation you have several choices to choose from, hand torch, shrinking tip on a stud gun or a shrinking tip used on your mig welder. The shrinking tip for mig welders may be a very viable option to you, but make sure you practice with it before you apply it to panel. I use all three of these methods during panel fabrication. The fact you own an english wheel, I can say you need to become versed in each of these methods. I have been using an english wheel for 40+ years and can say they are one of the hardest tools to learn when starting out.
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  5. #5
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    Aug 2022
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    Manawatu, New Zealand
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    Default Tig Shrink

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i don't have a stud welder, so i use my tig torch instead. same principle though, heat and cool a small area. it's amazing how effective it is. i do small groupings of spots, trying to be careful not to do too much at a time.
    Hi b marler.
    Iíd be really keen to hear how your use of the tig for shrinking.
    Iím working on a project away from home , so , limited resources , no oxy/acet (and be honest , I know Iím not proficient enough to trust myself with this method) , and having read your comments on various post regarding the tig use , how else to get a better understanding of this method than from someone whoís obviously got full trust in it .
    Cheers
    Shrappy 😎

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shrapnel View Post
    Hi b marler.
    Iíd be really keen to hear how your use of the tig for shrinking.
    Iím working on a project away from home , so , limited resources , no oxy/acet (and be honest , I know Iím not proficient enough to trust myself with this method) , and having read your comments on various post regarding the tig use , how else to get a better understanding of this method than from someone whoís obviously got full trust in it .
    Cheers
    Shrappy 😎
    it's not complicated, just set the power down pretty low. i'm around 50 amps-ish, depending on metal gauge and temperature. i'll sharpie the shape of the area i want to shrink, then do small, dime sized areas, one at a time. you'll get a little dimple when you first heat it just get it glowing, and then quench with a wet rag and it will tighten right up. make a circle of these and then move into the center. or if the area is quite small, just do a center dot and move outward in a circular pattern. sometimes one dot is all you need, you just go slow and gauge the result. if you go too far, you can easily hammer stretch it back out. in fact, that's what i usually do, go just a tiny bit too far, then tune it with a hammer and dolly or slapping files.
    best to practice on a scrap first to get the heat dialed in. it doesn't take much.
    b marler

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    it's not complicated, just set the power down pretty low. i'm around 50 amps-ish, depending on metal gauge and temperature. i'll sharpie the shape of the area i want to shrink, then do small, dime sized areas, one at a time. you'll get a little dimple when you first heat it just get it glowing, and then quench with a wet rag and it will tighten right up. make a circle of these and then move into the center. or if the area is quite small, just do a center dot and move outward in a circular pattern. sometimes one dot is all you need, you just go slow and gauge the result. if you go too far, you can easily hammer stretch it back out. in fact, that's what i usually do, go just a tiny bit too far, then tune it with a hammer and dolly or slapping files.
    best to practice on a scrap first to get the heat dialed in. it doesn't take much.
    Just using the Tig torch works well, I think better than the shrinker tip setup on the stud gun. I have the shrinking disc (9 inch), stud gun with shrinker tip, and a DC tig. I haven't really been happy with the disc, I bought it from Wray Schelin (proshaper) about 7 years ago. I have the matching backing pad and all the parts they talk about using, but it just doesn't seem to stay centered on my large makita 7" grinder. The grinder is really heavy, which works for you on a horizontal but against you on vertical surfaces. They do make smaller discs that would work on smaller grinders....

  8. #8
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    Aug 2022
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    Manawatu, New Zealand
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    it's not complicated, just set the power down pretty low. i'm around 50 amps-ish, depending on metal gauge and temperature. i'll sharpie the shape of the area i want to shrink, then do small, dime sized areas, one at a time. you'll get a little dimple when you first heat it just get it glowing, and then quench with a wet rag and it will tighten right up. make a circle of these and then move into the center. or if the area is quite small, just do a center dot and move outward in a circular pattern. sometimes one dot is all you need, you just go slow and gauge the result. if you go too far, you can easily hammer stretch it back out. in fact, that's what i usually do, go just a tiny bit too far, then tune it with a hammer and dolly or slapping files.
    best to practice on a scrap first to get the heat dialed in. it doesn't take much.

    Awesome Stuff . In my mind I was thinking it mite be along those lines , so yeah , great to have your thoughts .
    50 or 5 ish amps ? Iím only using 20 - 30 amps to weld the panels up , panel thickness is either 20 gauge ( 1 mm ) or 18 gauge ( 1.2 mm ) .
    Do you use a large gas ceramic ? Increase or decrease the gas flow rate ?
    Iím nearly done here for this trip , so will have a play on some old damaged panels once Iím home in my own shop.

    Thanks again , appreciate your help.

    Shrappy 😎

  9. #9
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    Aug 2022
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    Manawatu, New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by fj5gtx View Post
    Just using the Tig torch works well, I think better than the shrinker tip setup on the stud gun. I have the shrinking disc (9 inch), stud gun with shrinker tip, and a DC tig. I haven't really been happy with the disc, I bought it from Wray Schelin (proshaper) about 7 years ago. I have the matching backing pad and all the parts they talk about using, but it just doesn't seem to stay centered on my large makita 7" grinder. The grinder is really heavy, which works for you on a horizontal but against you on vertical surfaces. They do make smaller discs that would work on smaller grinders....

    Iíve got a shrinking disc , and have found that on some stuff it works really well , other times it makes little difference , but definitely worth having on hand .
    With this particular area , Iíve pulled the high spots out of the panels , but unfortunately, the panels are still to full in shape ( car has been in a bad wreck at some point ) so I need to shrink some of that shape back more and found the disc wasnít doing moving the Panel anymore.
    Looking forward to having a play with the tig method once Iím back home in my own shop.
    Cheers
    Shrappy 😎

  10. #10
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    Nov 2005
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    47,716

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shrapnel View Post
    Iíve got a shrinking disc , and have found that on some stuff it works really well , other times it makes little difference , but definitely worth having on hand .
    With this particular area , Iíve pulled the high spots out of the panels , but unfortunately, the panels are still to full in shape ( car has been in a bad wreck at some point ) so I need to shrink some of that shape back more and found the disc wasnít doing moving the Panel anymore.
    Looking forward to having a play with the tig method once Iím back home in my own shop.
    Cheers
    Shrappy 😎
    Before my shrink disk I used my torch and found it didn't work that well so I bought a shrink disk and I didn't like that either. For the last ten years I've been using my stud welder with the shrink tip and it works great. Between the stud welder for pulling dents out and the shrink tip we use that tool a lot.


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shrapnel View Post
    Awesome Stuff . In my mind I was thinking it mite be along those lines , so yeah , great to have your thoughts .
    50 or 5 ish amps ? Iím only using 20 - 30 amps to weld the panels up , panel thickness is either 20 gauge ( 1 mm ) or 18 gauge ( 1.2 mm ) .
    Do you use a large gas ceramic ? Increase or decrease the gas flow rate ?
    Iím nearly done here for this trip , so will have a play on some old damaged panels once Iím home in my own shop.

    Thanks again , appreciate your help.

    Shrappy 😎
    oh yeah, i don't really use all 50 amps. i just set it there so i get good resolution on the foot pedal. the pedal gives you from zero to whatever the panel setting is at. set the panel at full and you don't get as fine of control. set it at 50 and there's great control at the lower settings.
    i use a gas lens, small cup, and 1/16 tungsten. with that setup i run about 15 cfh through the flow meter. you can certainly use larger tungsten if that's what you have, i use the small stuff as i'm doing tiny welds on polished stainless all the time.
    b marler

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Before my shrink disk I used my torch and found it didn't work that well so I bought a shrink disk and I didn't like that either. For the last ten years I've been using my stud welder with the shrink tip and it works great. Between the stud welder for pulling dents out and the shrink tip we use that tool a lot.

    Cheers for that Len
    Yeah , Iím looking into stud welders now . The trunk lid (1936 ford coupe) on the car looks like someoneís had a bit of a dance on it . Apart from that , itís in mint condition with no rust . Thereís limited access from behind, so hopefully I can use the stud welder to pull the dents out (no real creases that I can see) , and from there , try it for any shrinking that needs doing.
    Had a quick play with the tig method on the back lower trunk panel (again , no access for hammer, Dolly or spoon) and got a pretty pleasing result.
    Cheers
    Shrappy 😎

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    oh yeah, i don't really use all 50 amps. i just set it there so i get good resolution on the foot pedal. the pedal gives you from zero to whatever the panel setting is at. set the panel at full and you don't get as fine of control. set it at 50 and there's great control at the lower settings.
    i use a gas lens, small cup, and 1/16 tungsten. with that setup i run about 15 cfh through the flow meter. you can certainly use larger tungsten if that's what you have, i use the small stuff as i'm doing tiny welds on polished stainless all the time.
    Ah right , yeah , using the peddle makes sense. My peddle is a big clumsy thing , so most my welding i do off set amperage settings. However , , when Iím doing stainless trim repairs , yeah , the peddle is used . Iíll set it to 5 or 6 Amps , and use the full swing of the peddle for fine tune control.
    I had a quick play with the tig shrinking the other day ( one area the disc wasnít working , and no access for hammer , Dolly or spoons ) and got a pleasing result. Yup , small shroud , 1.6 tungsten and about 10cfm . I set my tig to 5 amps , only did small spirals , and no blistering or pitting (for want of a term) in the heated zone on the panel.
    Iíve got a damaged & rusted panel repair coming up where the customer has supplied a new repro Patch panel , so Iíll have a proper play on the damaged one once I get it out.
    Cheers again for your input , muchly Appreciated.
    Shrappy 😎

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shrapnel View Post
    Ah right , yeah , using the peddle makes sense. My peddle is a big clumsy thing , so most my welding i do off set amperage settings. However , , when Iím doing stainless trim repairs , yeah , the peddle is used . Iíll set it to 5 or 6 Amps , and use the full swing of the peddle for fine tune control.
    I had a quick play with the tig shrinking the other day ( one area the disc wasnít working , and no access for hammer , Dolly or spoons ) and got a pleasing result. Yup , small shroud , 1.6 tungsten and about 10cfm . I set my tig to 5 amps , only did small spirals , and no blistering or pitting (for want of a term) in the heated zone on the panel.
    Iíve got a damaged & rusted panel repair coming up where the customer has supplied a new repro Patch panel , so Iíll have a proper play on the damaged one once I get it out.
    Cheers again for your input , muchly Appreciated.
    Shrappy 😎
    glad to help. people here are always willing to share information that will help you achieve good results. everyone is different though, so what works for one won't always work for another. practice is what really makes the difference.
    good luck!
    b marler

  15. #15
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    one method i have used. i have never used a shrinking disc. i put an old worn out 9 inch or 6 inch disc on my disc sander it will heat the metal and locate the high spots and shrink the metal without removing much if any metal and cost virtually nothing.

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