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Thread: single stage vs. basecoat/clearcoat (again)

  1. #1

    Default single stage vs. basecoat/clearcoat (again)

    I have used the search feature and read I think is just about all the comparisons/pros & cons between the two. Mostly it comes down to the guy holding the gun and what he/she is looking for today, tomorrow and in the next few years. I get all that, so here is my question.

    My 72 Blazer is apart now with most everything ready for color. Len suggested once that I paint the inside of the cab area and the inside of the bed in one shoot then tape off and do the outside afterwards. Mostly to keep the overwhelming job from overwhelming a guy that does not do this for a living/professional. I think I am going that route.

    I have painted 10-12 trucks/cars in the past all with either acrylic enamel or acrylic urethane. None of them made it to Barret Jackson but they served the purpose of a daily driver/weekend cruiser.

    I want to give BC/CC a try but still have some reservations, mostly around knowledge and skill set.

    My plan now is to buy a quart of BC/CC from our local store and spray the inside of the fenders and the underside of the hood then spray clear.

    If I get the warm fuzzies from those panels with BC/CC I can buy more and move forward with the interior/inside of the bed next.

    Thoughts from those that know? Do this for a living?

    Scott

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    35,010

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    Painting with base coat/clear coat is a lot easier and more forgiving that painting with single stage. Especially with metallic based colors. If you get a run in a single stage metallic job then in most cases you're screwed and will have to sand down and repair the whole panel (which can cause a paint mismatch to the adjoining panels, even with the same paint out of the same can).

    With a little practice it's pretty hard to screw up a basecoat even in metallic. And if you get a run in the clearcoat you just sand it out and buff the panel or reclear the panel.............. no paint mismatches.

    I haven't sprayed a single stage paint in more than 20 years.
    LS says "Lets Go Brandon". He's like that.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I will try to post some pics in the next few days.

    Scott

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    189

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    BC/CC is more labor and material cost. And given the extra coats, more opportunity to get trash in the job, a consideration for those w/o a paint booth. You can tack off your base before you CC, that can help with trash - but you want to use tack cloths that aren't super sticky.

    I switched from BC/CC to SS when I moved and lost my 4 bay DIY shop (I just do this as a hobby). I can sand SS solids and make them as flat as clear, but you if you screw up a SS metallic job you're going to scuff and shoot again. I've only done one metallic SS bumper job, it turned out ok - but I wouldn't say stunning.

    The joy (for me) of using BC/CC is how flat and clean (and quickly) you can get it with progressive high grits with a slight joggle (3/32 nds) DA with an interface pad. I use the sander on the SS solid jobs too, when I put more than 2 coats on.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
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    2,113

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott123 View Post
    I have used the search feature and read I think is just about all the comparisons/pros & cons between the two. Mostly it comes down to the guy holding the gun and what he/she is looking for today, tomorrow and in the next few years. I get all that, so here is my question.

    My 72 Blazer is apart now with most everything ready for color. Len suggested once that I paint the inside of the cab area and the inside of the bed in one shoot then tape off and do the outside afterwards. Mostly to keep the overwhelming job from overwhelming a guy that does not do this for a living/professional. I think I am going that route.

    I have painted 10-12 trucks/cars in the past all with either acrylic enamel or acrylic urethane. None of them made it to Barret Jackson but they served the purpose of a daily driver/weekend cruiser.

    I want to give BC/CC a try but still have some reservations, mostly around knowledge and skill set.

    My plan now is to buy a quart of BC/CC from our local store and spray the inside of the fenders and the underside of the hood then spray clear.

    If I get the warm fuzzies from those panels with BC/CC I can buy more and move forward with the interior/inside of the bed next.

    Thoughts from those that know? Do this for a living?

    Scott
    base/clear certainly has it's merits. like phil says, with metallics it's almost mandatory. i've done plenty of ss metallic paint jobs, but i wouldn't recommend it for someone that isn't experienced.
    for a resto-mod, base/clear is a great choice. for unmodified classics in a solid color, i choose single stage as it puts the color right on top and looks closer to what you'd have gotten from the factory back then. i had a 72 blazer in hugger orange years ago. man i loved that truck. i spent a lot of time making it perfect. sold it for asking price the same day the ad came out in piston and rudder. obviously didn't ask enough money. seems to be a recurring theme with me.
    back to your situation.
    base/clear is super easy to shoot. i don't see any reason you wouldn't like it. a lot of guys will do the jamb work in single stage and switch to base/clear for the exterior. matter of preference i guess.
    i wouldn't apprehensive to try it, it's a piece of cake.
    b marler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    35,010

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    I don't see where single stage is cheaper in materials than a BC/CC paint. Single stage color is a lot more expensive than clear and it takes at least twice as much single stage material to do a paint job as it does just clear coat and clear is a lot cheaper than single stage color.

    I agree with Bmarler (as usual, he's has good advice). Particularly in this case of trying to duplicate a non metallic vintage car/truck paint job. It does look more authentic compared to BC/CC. I'm thinking of painting my '62 Renault Dauphine in single stage non metallic factory darker red. (it will look more like original 1962 factory paint). A thought just occurred to me, there is practically NO orange peel in the factory paint on the Dauphine. American cars from the '60's and especially the '70's had more than their fair share of factory orange peel.
    LS says "Lets Go Brandon". He's like that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    189

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    I don't see where single stage is cheaper in materials than a BC/CC paint. Single stage color is a lot more expensive than clear and it takes at least twice as much single stage material to do a paint job as it does just clear coat and clear is a lot cheaper than single stage color.
    I can get good cover with ppg shopline Ss in 2 coats. If I'm going to sand, 1 more. Basecoat takes 2 coats to cover, then cc is 2, and if I'm going to sand I'll put 3 on it. I used to buy the top line ppg, but not for over 10 years.

  8. #8

    Default

    Mine will be Hugger Orange as well. I have had a number of them over the years and sold each for maybe less than I should and even paid more for a couple than I should. ( I am the guy that spends more so the next guy gets the deal, or at least that is the way it seems). Now some guy named Barret Jackson is making the 72 K5 prices for a rolling pile of crap just simply out of this world. But that is a different topic altogether.

    I am leaning toward the BC/CC and will more than likely decide on Monday. I should have everything ready by then and a decision will have to be made sooner than later. I have been painting this Blazer going on four years now. Every time I decide to take it apart I change my mind because it is so much fun to drive in the summer. This time I pulled the trigger but eager to get it back on the road.

    I will get some pics up soon.

    Thanks for the input.

    S






    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    base/clear certainly has it's merits. like phil says, with metallics it's almost mandatory. i've done plenty of ss metallic paint jobs, but i wouldn't recommend it for someone that isn't experienced.
    for a resto-mod, base/clear is a great choice. for unmodified classics in a solid color, i choose single stage as it puts the color right on top and looks closer to what you'd have gotten from the factory back then. i had a 72 blazer in hugger orange years ago. man i loved that truck. i spent a lot of time making it perfect. sold it for asking price the same day the ad came out in piston and rudder. obviously didn't ask enough money. seems to be a recurring theme with me.
    back to your situation.
    base/clear is super easy to shoot. i don't see any reason you wouldn't like it. a lot of guys will do the jamb work in single stage and switch to base/clear for the exterior. matter of preference i guess.
    i wouldn't apprehensive to try it, it's a piece of cake.

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