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Thread: The dreaded orange peel

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Good post. And I agree with everything but the fan wide open. All the guns I have used with the fan wide open will put too much paint to the outsdie edges of the fan. Turn the fan screw wide open and then slowly bring it back in just a little, until the fan pattern is equal end to end. Fan test pattern should be a cigar shape. If the fan is wide open the test pattern will look more like a barbell with more concentration on the top and bottom of the fan.
    i guess i should have been more clear when i said full fan. i do turn in the screw till it just clips the ends. doesn't take much turning to do that. i've always done that with all my guns as the pattern is better. a quick blast on a scrap piece will show that nice cigar shape like you describe.
    interesting to hear bau's comments regarding some of the other guns setup. i don't have experience with sata or iwata equipment so maybe there's a case for using the adjustment knobs on some high output models.
    b marler

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
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    34,617

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i guess i should have been more clear when i said full fan. i do turn in the screw till it just clips the ends. doesn't take much turning to do that. i've always done that with all my guns as the pattern is better. a quick blast on a scrap piece will show that nice cigar shape like you describe.
    interesting to hear bau's comments regarding some of the other guns setup. i don't have experience with sata or iwata equipment so maybe there's a case for using the adjustment knobs on some high output models.
    The Iwata guns I've used are the same as other gun in that you open the fluid control knob wide open so the trigger pulls all the way back. Then like you said, start screwing it back in the until it just starts to move the needle then stop and leave it there permanently.

    the only time a fluid control knob needs to be "necked down" is when you're using a full size gun to do a small sized guns job. You cut back on the fluid control, cut back on the air going through the gun and narrow the fan down. To mimic a small gun like the Devilbiss SRI or Sata minijet.

    You Mr. Bmarler are obviously a well experience painter.

    So is Baubau, which I don't understand his screwing in the fluid control knob.
    LS says "Lets Go Brandon". He's like that.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    The Iwata guns I've used are the same as other gun in that you open the fluid control knob wide open so the trigger pulls all the way back. Then like you said, start screwing it back in the until it just starts to move the needle then stop and leave it there permanently.

    the only time a fluid control knob needs to be "necked down" is when you're using a full size gun to do a small sized guns job. You cut back on the fluid control, cut back on the air going through the gun and narrow the fan down. To mimic a small gun like the Devilbiss SRI or Sata minijet.

    You Mr. Bmarler are obviously a well experience painter.

    So is Baubau, which I don't understand his screwing in the fluid control knob.
    i thought it was a little curious too, that's why i mentioned it. i've also heard those guns (sata in particular) can be real hosers though, best suited for high production work.
    i find the sagola is well suited for my style of painting. a little slower, but sooo smooth.
    and thank you for the compliment.
    b marler

  4. #19

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    Hey guys, appreciate all the responses. So here is an update: my son has a buddy who wanted his truck painted so I told him I would do it. Its a freebie labor wise because I really want to figure this out, its a hobby I really enjoy. So I made some adjustments and I have to say I really impressed myself. Still have some adjusting to do because I think I can do even better but I have myself on the right track. First thing I did was heat my shop up 24 hours before, setting the temp at 10 degrees above my reducer and hardner so that the panels would be warm. Second, I reduced my clear about 15% to help it flow out a bit. Third, I increased my gun pressure to around 40psi and had the fluid turned just about 2 full turns out with full fan. Fourth, I got closer to the panel, maybe 3 to 4 inches away while spraying and moved faster than previously. I always tried to get right up to the point of no return before I would get runs and would try to load it on. Today I did thinner coats that I would call medium wet. The combination of these gave me great results, the insides of the doors were smooth as glass. Next weekend Im tackling the outside of the truck so hopefully I can replicate my results. It is warmer this weekend in Wisconsin, mid 60's as compared to low 20's last time I tried so maybe warm compressor air helped, cant be sure though.

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