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Thread: 1960's GM Frame Metal Thickness

  1. #1

    Question 1960's GM Frame Metal Thickness

    I have a '65 Impala and '69 Camaro that both require one or two body mount brackets (frame side) to be re-holed. Camaro looks to be a hefty 10-11 gauge (a solid .125) while the Impala measures a wide range 13-gauge with readings from .078-.098. I'll be using 10 and 12 respectively but simply curious if anyone knows what the factory specs were?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    I have a '65 Impala and '69 Camaro that both require one or two body mount brackets (frame side) to be re-holed. Camaro looks to be a hefty 10-11 gauge (a solid .125) while the Impala measures a wide range 13-gauge with readings from .078-.098. I'll be using 10 and 12 respectively but simply curious if anyone knows what the factory specs were?
    What are your concerns, are you trying to keep it stock?

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the reply Len.

    Nope, not concerned about looking untouched and stock. My question as to a typical boxed perimeter frames gauge of the mid 60's is more or less out of curiosity. I'm finding many (if not most) body panels of that era seem to be 19-gauge and floors 16-gauge. I have seen though that frames are not always a single gauge from front to back. In addition, "rungs" of the ladder frames can be of a different gauge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aurecom View Post
    Thanks for the reply Len.

    Nope, not concerned about looking untouched and stock. My question as to a typical boxed perimeter frames gauge of the mid 60's is more or less out of curiosity. I'm finding many (if not most) body panels of that era seem to be 19-gauge and floors 16-gauge. I have seen though that frames are not always a single gauge from front to back. In addition, "rungs" of the ladder frames can be of a different gauge.
    I haven't done that job on those cars but you should be able to keep it looking stock even if the metal gauge is not perfect.

  5. #5
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    car manufacturers were always balancing strength and weight when it came to frames and panels. i've even seen identical factory panels made from different gauge metal for special versions of the same car. same for frames. there are cars and trucks using the same frame, but gauge will change depending on the hauling capacity or horsepower rating. stiffeners were often thinner gauge. they still do the job, but are lighter, and can crush, or deform in an impact in order to protect other areas.
    b marler

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