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Thread: Stripping a chrome pot metal dash.

  1. #16
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    Well they seem damn proud of that stuff, don't they?
    LET'S GO DARWIN!

  2. #17

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    Cosmichrome, paint is Global basecoat with D8115 matte clear over the silver base and black base.

    here is a sign for USPS, spray chrome and a custom Kandy I made, then matte clear

    20200607_091736.jpg

  3. #18
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    Since I am painting the face black, what would be the simplest thing to use as filler? If I grind out a small little 1/16th ball on the corrosion point, what can I use to fill that with?
    It's so small that I don't think bondo would work.

    What about some JB Weld?

    Just want to get rid of the corrosion sand smooth and paint.
    LET'S GO DARWIN!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    Since I am painting the face black, what would be the simplest thing to use as filler? If I grind out a small little 1/16th ball on the corrosion point, what can I use to fill that with?
    It's so small that I don't think bondo would work.

    What about some JB Weld?

    Just want to get rid of the corrosion sand smooth and paint.
    That is the reason I state to hit it with a HB primer (like Optex 4:1 or Feather Fill, both by Evercoat). I would start with 2 or 3 coats, sand and check part. May need to apply additional coats. Part will be uniform across surface and help with strength integrity. It will hold those 1/16" ball divots. Caution, tape off fitment area so part will go back in.

  5. #20
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    Ok, so I have a can of Upol 2253 4:1 high build primer.

    The UPOL help line said I need to scuff the chrome with 220 grit or coarser to give the primer a bite.

    Trying to sand each of those little channels is going to be hard to do since they are only 1/8" wide.

    How would you guys go about doing this? I have a sanding sponge but it doesn't really get into those grooves great.

    Would an acid etch primer first help, hurt or not do a damn thing for me?
    What about an epoxy primer onto the chrome first, then the Upol?

    Or just scuff the best I can and clean like a mo fo?


    Or quit worrying, they splashed lacquer paint right over the chrome 50 years ago and it lasted pretty well.
    Last edited by Houndogforever; 04-15-2022 at 01:24 PM.
    LET'S GO DARWIN!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    Ok, so I have a can of Upol 2253 4:1 high build primer.

    The UPOL help line said I need to scuff the chrome with 220 grit or coarser to give the primer a bite.

    Trying to sand each of those little channels is going to be hard to do since they are only 1/8" wide.

    How would you guys go about doing this? I have a sanding sponge but it doesn't really get into those grooves great.

    Would an acid etch primer first help, hurt or not do a damn thing for me?
    What about an epoxy primer onto the chrome first, then the Upol?

    Or just scuff the best I can and clean like a mo fo?


    Or quit worrying, they splashed lacquer paint right over the chrome 50 years ago and it lasted pretty well.
    We would probably wrap a piece of 80 grit (or whatever) around a body filler spreader then take our time to scuff each grove well. If the grove is a little wider we wrap the paper around the back edge of the spreader.


  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    We would probably wrap a piece of 80 grit (or whatever) around a body filler spreader then take our time to scuff each grove well. If the grove is a little wider we wrap the paper around the back edge of the spreader.

    Len is right on the money, as usual!

  8. #23
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    I was intending on using the SEM Trim Black on my interior metal dash, across top of doors and around the back window.

    Is there a hardener that you can add to this paint to help make it tougher?
    LET'S GO DARWIN!

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    I was intending on using the SEM Trim Black on my interior metal dash, across top of doors and around the back window.

    Is there a hardener that you can add to this paint to help make it tougher?
    Several hardeners may work well but you should do some experimenting prior to putting it where you want it.

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    We would probably wrap a piece of 80 grit (or whatever) around a body filler spreader then take our time to scuff each grove well. If the grove is a little wider we wrap the paper around the back edge of the spreader.


    I would not recommend using paper on top of the spreader without first shaping it either flat or a nice round over with some sand paper. spreaders are not symmetrical up top and leave a uneven groove

    if the bottom is to skinny and the top is to fat then trim a little off the bottom to desired thickness, the spreader is a "wedge shape" so taking a bit off the bottom can get your desired thickness.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightOilJK View Post
    I would not recommend using paper on top of the spreader without first shaping it either flat or a nice round over with some sand paper. spreaders are not symmetrical up top and leave a uneven groove

    if the bottom is to skinny and the top is to fat then trim a little off the bottom to desired thickness, the spreader is a "wedge shape" so taking a bit off the bottom can get your desired thickness.
    i do it all the time. i wrap self adhesive paper around the skinny edge to get into tight areas, or the fat edge if i need a little more heft. you can take advantage of the radiused side of the fat edge, or flip it to use the sharper corner. different spreaders have different shapes though. your method of taking some off the bottom to get to thickness is also good if you need something specific. all in all they're super handy.
    as are paint sticks, plexiglass pieces, aluminum blocks, or anything else laying around the shop.
    b marler

  12. #27
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    Believe it or not, this is what I found does the best for me.



    It comes with 80, 120, 180 ,240 grit belts. Sand a groove, rotate the belt a 1/4" and sand the next one.

    I kept having the self adhesive paper slip off the spreader and it was frustrating, but these stupid little sticks work for me.
    LET'S GO DARWIN!

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i do it all the time. i wrap self adhesive paper around the skinny edge to get into tight areas, or the fat edge if i need a little more heft. you can take advantage of the radiused side of the fat edge, or flip it to use the sharper corner. different spreaders have different shapes though. your method of taking some off the bottom to get to thickness is also good if you need something specific. all in all they're super handy.
    as are paint sticks, plexiglass pieces, aluminum blocks, or anything else laying around the shop.
    whatever works for you

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