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Thread: Howdy from the UK! Big Rocker (sill) Damage Help please

  1. #1
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    Oct 2010
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    Default Howdy from the UK! Big Rocker (sill) Damage Help please

    How y'all doing folks from the other side of the pond!!

    I need your expert thoughts on pulling this out guys or if its even possible, it's quite a dent I have managed to pull some out with some glue and a slide hammer but that's the best i could do.

    Pics below, not the best but hopefully gives you an idea.

    ok.jpg
    IMG_20210604_163513 (2).jpg
    IMG_20210604_164011 (2).jpg
    IMG_20210604_163653.jpg
    IMG_20210604_164117.jpg

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    If it came in our shop like that we could do one of two types of repair.

    1. We could use a stud welder to attach pins to the low spots then either slide hammer them out or attach a clamp and pull them out.

    2. We may also braze pull tabs on the damage and pull it out.


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    If it came in our shop like that we could do one of two types of repair.

    1. We could use a stud welder to attach pins to the low spots then either slide hammer them out or attach a clamp and pull them out.

    2. We may also braze pull tabs on the damage and pull it out.





    Thanks Len for the reply. I did think about tack welding them plates on but they are not available in the England

    I was thinking to use some washers instead. I am on a strict budget, some said fill it but i aint doing that!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee182UK View Post
    [/B]


    Thanks Len for the reply. I did think about tack welding them plates on but they are not available in the England

    I was thinking to use some washers instead. I am on a strict budget, some said fill it but i aint doing that!
    You could weld metal to it to pull it out but you could also increase the damage doing it that way because welding can weaken the metal and cause a hole when pulling.

    Filling is not a bad idea as long as you level it properly then use a decent primer to tweak and seal the filled area.

    If you go the filler route be sure to grind the area with a coarse grit to give the filler a surface to bite onto.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    You could weld metal to it to pull it out but you could also increase the damage doing it that way because welding can weaken the metal and cause a hole when pulling.

    Filling is not a bad idea as long as you level it properly then use a decent primer to tweak and seal the filled area.

    If you go the filler route be sure to grind the area with a coarse grit to give the filler a surface to bite onto.
    Thanks Len, surprised you say this as it's considered a 'bodge' over here!

    I did see something similar on youtube where a guy pulled his A pillar with a chain and a ratchet type puller! it did work!

    c

  6. #6
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    Since you are on a budget I'm guessing a stud gun is out of the question. I think trying to mig weld on that sheet metal is probably going to give you more grieve. I would consider making up several 6-8 inch "J" hooks from 1/4" steel rod, ground the tip down to flat and narrow and braze them on. You could also try a high tensile strength solder such as Muggy Weld #1 for soldering on the J hooks. Once hooks are attached in strategic locations it's a simple matter on tapping them out. That dent seems is too deep for my liking using just a body filler. Many decades ago when I was much younger and money was tight I used the "J" hook method by brazing on the hooks using a coat hanger for welding rod. On occasion I still use "J" hooks for tapping out SM when I have an extreme angle that my stud guns can't handle.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Since you are on a budget I'm guessing a stud gun is out of the question. I think trying to mig weld on that sheet metal is probably going to give you more grieve. I would consider making up several 6-8 inch "J" hooks from 1/4" steel rod, ground the tip down to flat and narrow and braze them on. You could also try a high tensile strength solder such as Muggy Weld #1 for soldering on the J hooks. Once hooks are attached in strategic locations it's a simple matter on tapping them out. That dent seems is too deep for my liking using just a body filler. Many decades ago when I was much younger and money was tight I used the "J" hook method by brazing on the hooks using a coat hanger for welding rod. On occasion I still use "J" hooks for tapping out SM when I have an extreme angle that my stud guns can't handle.
    Thanks for that Ronf, certainly got me thinking now

    I've only got a MIG welder and i dont know anything about brazing

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee182UK View Post
    Thanks for that Ronf, certainly got me thinking now

    I've only got a MIG welder and i dont know anything about brazing
    I would make up the J hooks and practice tacking them onto like gauge sheet metal with mig using .23 wire until you can confidently adhere them without blowing through. Start your stinger on the J hook (not the panel) and push the puddle onto panel. I have 40+ years of SM work & welding experience and would still practice myself before getting on the panel. If you go this route you will also need to practice pulling (hammering on face of J hook) in short taps so that you don't pull a hole in the SM as the metal will be weakened. Practice, practice and more practice until you can confidently get on the panel.

    FYI, you will have to cut and grind the J hooks off at the tips, don't wrench or twist them off like stud gun pins or you will end up with a hole.

  9. #9
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    another thing to think about.
    using rons j-hook idea, or i've done it welding washers on, make a bridge that spans the area so you can either use threaded rod for the j hooks, or hook the washers with a threaded rod. drill holes in the bridge you made and pull on everything slow and controlled. 3 inch channel steel will span a few feet easily, stand it off a few inches but be careful to have a fairly good sized foot so you don't do damage where it touches down. i use this method when there's a fairly large area to pull on, as when i use a slide hammer it can tear out too easily from the impacts. it can be fiddly to get it all set in position too, so get a friend to help.
    hope that made some sense?
    b marler

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Since you are on a budget I'm guessing a stud gun is out of the question. I think trying to mig weld on that sheet metal is probably going to give you more grieve. I would consider making up several 6-8 inch "J" hooks from 1/4" steel rod, ground the tip down to flat and narrow and braze them on. You could also try a high tensile strength solder such as Muggy Weld #1 for soldering on the J hooks. Once hooks are attached in strategic locations it's a simple matter on tapping them out. That dent seems is too deep for my liking using just a body filler. Many decades ago when I was much younger and money was tight I used the "J" hook method by brazing on the hooks using a coat hanger for welding rod. On occasion I still use "J" hooks for tapping out SM when I have an extreme angle that my stud guns can't handle.
    good old coat hangers. that made me remember when i was younger, working as a mechanic at a local service station. the owner was too cheap to buy real brazing rod. i had to do all my exhaust welding using the coat hangers the linen service brought our uniforms on.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    another thing to think about.
    using rons j-hook idea, or i've done it welding washers on, make a bridge that spans the area so you can either use threaded rod for the j hooks, or hook the washers with a threaded rod. drill holes in the bridge you made and pull on everything slow and controlled. 3 inch channel steel will span a few feet easily, stand it off a few inches but be careful to have a fairly good sized foot so you don't do damage where it touches down. i use this method when there's a fairly large area to pull on, as when i use a slide hammer it can tear out too easily from the impacts. it can be fiddly to get it all set in position too, so get a friend to help.
    hope that made some sense?
    Superb advice, makes perfect sense that.

    Thanks a bunch bmarler, I'll be sure to post up the results when i do it

  12. #12
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    One other thought comes to mind that may be of use is a bridge puller kit in which you hot glue on a pulling post. I picked up one of these 7 or 8 years ago at a Good Guys car show but have never used it. For me it was to be just another tool that might come into play some time down the road (typical car guy b.s., jeez I'm a sucker for new tools). I have no experience with them but I think PDR guys may use these, not sure. The bridge puller I bought didn't come with glue stick so I'm not sure if they use a special formulated glue stick. Maybe someone here can expand on their use.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    another thing to think about.
    using rons j-hook idea, or i've done it welding washers on, make a bridge that spans the area so you can either use threaded rod for the j hooks, or hook the washers with a threaded rod. drill holes in the bridge you made and pull on everything slow and controlled. 3 inch channel steel will span a few feet easily, stand it off a few inches but be careful to have a fairly good sized foot so you don't do damage where it touches down. i use this method when there's a fairly large area to pull on, as when i use a slide hammer it can tear out too easily from the impacts. it can be fiddly to get it all set in position too, so get a friend to help.
    hope that made some sense?
    bmarler,

    This is a very good idea and way to approach this repair.
    I really like the ability of the controlled pull using the threaded rods a little at a time as opposed to the banging jolt of a slide hammer.
    The idea of making useful tools with misc scrap in the shop is always an added bonus!
    Probably why I like watching this guy in action, he is always fabricating things out of scrap in the yard!
    He may be a little unorthodox, but always seems to get the job done.

    1.jpg
    2.jpg

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by S-C View Post
    bmarler,

    This is a very good idea and way to approach this repair.
    I really like the ability of the controlled pull using the threaded rods a little at a time as opposed to the banging jolt of a slide hammer.
    The idea of making useful tools with misc scrap in the shop is always an added bonus!
    Probably why I like watching this guy in action, he is always fabricating things out of scrap in the yard!
    He may be a little unorthodox, but always seems to get the job done.

    1.jpg
    2.jpg
    Absolutely agree. Many times, as you well know, we have to think outside the box on some of the unconventional repairs. As they say "where there is a will there is a way", it is what makes this industry interesting and rewarding. Thank goodness I'm seldom pressed for time.

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