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Thread: How long can filler be left uncoated

  1. #1

    Default How long can filler be left uncoated

    Hi,

    In the past I've heard folks say that you can't use body filler and leave it without a top coat for very long because it will absorb moisture from the air and cause issues...?

    I'm working on stripping and painting an entire car and have the benefit of keeping it in a garage while I'm working.... so is there a window of time for leaving body filler areas uncoated (with either epoxy, or filler primer, etc.)?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    Hi,

    In the past I've heard folks say that you can't use body filler and leave it without a top coat for very long because it will absorb moisture from the air and cause issues...?

    I'm working on stripping and painting an entire car and have the benefit of keeping it in a garage while I'm working.... so is there a window of time for leaving body filler areas uncoated (with either epoxy, or filler primer, etc.)?
    if you're not in a high humidity area you should be ok for weeks, maybe more. more importantly would be to protect it from other contamination while you work on things. i drape it with masking plastic so i don't get crap in it.
    b marler

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    Hi,

    In the past I've heard folks say that you can't use body filler and leave it without a top coat for very long because it will absorb moisture from the air and cause issues...?

    I'm working on stripping and painting an entire car and have the benefit of keeping it in a garage while I'm working.... so is there a window of time for leaving body filler areas uncoated (with either epoxy, or filler primer, etc.)?
    As long as the filler doesn't get wet it shouldn't matter how long it sits before priming and painting.

  4. #4
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    I don't think time is much of an issue but just as bmarler stated you need to keep work covered. Some time back I bought 1 or 2 dozen cheap bed sheets from Amazon to cover cars for extended care. I cover the sheets with 6 mil poly. You don't want to be sanding and grinding in other areas without protecting your surface. If you have exposed steel from sanding body filler you will need to hit those areas with a coat of epoxy primer to prevent surface and flash rust.

  5. #5

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    Thanks so much...

    That actually brings up a related question: after stripping to bare metal, is it better to Picklex the metal and do filler/body work straight away - or coat it all with epoxy primer and then scuff it back in each area as i tackle the body work...?

    hopefully that question makes sense.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    Thanks so much...

    That actually brings up a related question: after stripping to bare metal, is it better to Picklex the metal and do filler/body work straight away - or coat it all with epoxy primer and then scuff it back in each area as i tackle the body work...?

    hopefully that question makes sense.
    If the metal isn't rusted you can skip the Picklex just make sure you've given the metal some tooth by sanding/grinding with a coarse grit disk and press your filler into the scratches. If the metal has rust pits in it then apply the Picklex and work it into the rust with a scuff pad then wipe off the excess and let it dry then sand/grind on the metal before applying the filler.


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    Thanks so much...

    That actually brings up a related question: after stripping to bare metal, is it better to Picklex the metal and do filler/body work straight away - or coat it all with epoxy primer and then scuff it back in each area as i tackle the body work...?

    hopefully that question makes sense.
    Your going to find this procedure will depend on who is answering as there are several ways to store a part. While an active collision shop may store it one way, those of us who are not time critical may choose another route. I typically store a stripped to metal part in epoxy primer, when I bring it out of storage I'll scratch the surface and hit with either body filler of a product like Slick Sand or Optex 4:1. Lately, since switching to Optex as my go to spray filler/primer I have been storing parts in it. Optex is a dual purpose product in that it is a DTM spray filler and first coat epoxy primer. If you don't need a spray filler simply spray it with epoxy. Picklex has some restrictions as it is an acid based material requiring an epoxy primer prior to applying body filler.

  8. #8

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    I definitely have rust and pitting. So i was going to wire wheel all of that out and treat with picklex. I assume picklex will protect the raw metal as good as epoxy? (stored indoors.)

    How much tooth will the metal need before using filler ? 80grit?

    I also ordered some urekem Oxystik epoxy primer, which i was planning on using over the whole car once the body work is straight.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    I definitely have rust and pitting. So i was going to wire wheel all of that out and treat with picklex. I assume pickles will protect the raw metal as good as epoxy? (stored indoors.)

    How much tooth with the metal need before using filler ? 80grit?

    I also ordered some urekem epoxy primer, which i was planning on using over the whole car once the body work is straight.
    yes, you can store the panels treated with picklex. just keep an eye on them for any signs of corrosion. 80 grit is what i use before filler. just be sure to press the first pass in firmly so it fills the scratch.
    you might consider getting a small spot blaster so you can really dig in to those rust pits. wire wheels can sort of glaze the surface and not really dig the rust all the way out.
    b marler

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    Make sure you protect metal area from behind, not just front....inside panels, just anything spray on there,if bare metal , you don't want moisture to from.other side...

  11. #11

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    Len, are you still having good luck using EP21 Urekem over picklex?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    yes, you can store the panels treated with picklex. just keep an eye on them for any signs of corrosion. 80 grit is what i use before filler. just be sure to press the first pass in firmly so it fills the scratch.
    you might consider getting a small spot blaster so you can really dig in to those rust pits. wire wheels can sort of glaze the surface and not really dig the rust all the way out.
    bmarler gives best advice. I don't store any parts long term with any amount of rust, period. I will store cleaned up raw sheet metal in either Picklex or epoxy primer long term. Rust is a cancer that can ruin your day and may come back to haunt you. IF I use a wire wheel (seldom) I use stainless wheels only as to not imbed the metal with impurities when using a standard wire steel. I either spot blast for deep pits or DA to a clean surface. Like bmarler I hit with 80g prior to spreadable filler and 180g for SS or Optex.

    Also, just as baubau stated you have to hit both sides of SM to stay protected. I can't state this enough, rust is a cancer that will ruin a project if not properly dealt with. I go to countless car shows every year and on many of these custom builds in which the paint looks to be absolutely perfect you find, upon closer inspection, paint bubbling in numerous areas due too rust. This is very disheartening as you know the owner was trying to build his/her dream car. Think about the number of hours and costs you are putting into your dream ride only to find this pop up later, I would be devastated.

  13. #13

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    I had begun shooting the backs of panels and other "unseen" areas with an SEM product called Rust Trap. wondering if anyone here has any experience with it...

    And also, it seems there's no mention of neutralizing Picklex? is that correct?

    should it be wiped with anything just before applying epoxy primer over it?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biscuit View Post
    I had begun shooting the backs of panels and other "unseen" areas with an SEM product called Rust Trap. wondering if anyone here has any experience with it...

    And also, it seems there's no mention of neutralizing Picklex? is that correct?

    should it be wiped with anything just before applying epoxy primer over it?
    You want to just scuff the Picklex treated metal and make sure your epoxy primer doesn't contain acid.

  15. #15

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    I'm planning on using the Urekem Oxystik EP21 per your recommendation..... are you still seeing good results with that?

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