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Thread: hood repaint steps

  1. #1

    Default hood repaint steps

    it's been along time since ive done any sort of painting. I've searched through alot of the pages, and didnt seem to find an exact answer, just mainly looking for best practices answer. I'm going to be repainting a hood that has rock chips and delamination of the clear. my first thought is to completely strip 80-120 grit, epoxy prime, then shoot surfacer over the epoxy within the recoat window. then sand the surfacer after it is cured with 600 grit wet before my base.

    #2 do I just prepare the hood for epoxy primer and then go straight to basecoat?

    -- this will be a daily driver, so I dont need to cut corners. thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith5064 View Post
    it's been along time since ive done any sort of painting. I've searched through alot of the pages, and didnt seem to find an exact answer, just mainly looking for best practices answer. I'm going to be repainting a hood that has rock chips and delamination of the clear. my first thought is to completely strip 80-120 grit, epoxy prime, then shoot surfacer over the epoxy within the recoat window. then sand the surfacer after it is cured with 600 grit wet before my base.

    #2 do I just prepare the hood for epoxy primer and then go straight to basecoat?

    -- this will be a daily driver, so I dont need to cut corners. thanks for any advice.
    Your best result will be by stripping, epoxy, surfacer, sand and paint.

    If you go from metal to epoxy to paint it may be good but it's more of a crap shoot than applying and sanding the surfacer before painting.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Your best result will be by stripping, epoxy, surfacer, sand and paint.

    If you go from metal to epoxy to paint it may be good but it's more of a crap shoot than applying and sanding the surfacer before painting.
    I agree on that len, I have been reading and seen some people were using epoxy and then straight to base. seems like it would be quicker, but as you said there is some other variables that would have to come out perfect for it too work correctly.

    what is your view on sealer before basecoat? is it nessecary? there wont be much body work, maybe a small filler spot from a ding is all..

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith5064 View Post
    I agree on that len, I have been reading and seen some people were using epoxy and then straight to base. seems like it would be quicker, but as you said there is some other variables that would have to come out perfect for it too work correctly.

    what is your view on sealer before basecoat? is it nessecary? there wont be much body work, maybe a small filler spot from a ding is all..
    Sealer? It depends on several factors....

    1. is the surface or primer you're spraying over porous, can it absorb your top coat?

    2. are the top coat thin and easily absorbed by the substrate?

    In most cases using a good primer and top coats you can skip the sealer but a "good" dedicated sealer (not epoxy primer) can help you finish hold out and not flatten as it hardens/dries.

    When we do a high end paint job we will sometimes use a high quality sealer because we know it will look the same a year later. Kinda like painting on glass.

  5. #5
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    As always Len's advice is spot on, no surprise. For me your products and procedures would depend on what you do with the delaminated CC. Any product that delaminates screams of an unstable surface to me and needs to be removed entirely as it may come back to bite you. To my knowledge there is no way to determine any part of a delaminating CC surface is stable, which eliminates the easy route of scratch and shoot. As you didn't provide pics of your rock chips I'll assume it needs a spray filler such as Evercoat G2 featherfill, Slick Sand or Optex 4:1.

    If you can sand off all the CC (final sanded to 320g) without breaking through too metal my procedure would be to hit with epoxy primer, let it flash off and apply a spray filler as mentioned above. Sand surfacer with 180-220g and finish up with 400-600g to eliminate courser grit scratches. At this point all rock chips should have disappeared and panel surface is stable. To finish up i'll spray either 2 coats of over reduced epoxy primer such as PPG DPLF primer or a single coat of their dedicated DAS30XX sealer, followed by bc/cc after they flash off.

    Another method to consider; If I have any significant amount of break through to metal when sanding off the delaminated cc and still have rock chips to fill I would shoot the surface with Optex 4:1 as it is a DTM epoxy primer filler. As before I follow this with sanding out to 400-600 and shoot either the over reduce epoxy or a dedicated sealer immediately followed by bc/cc after flash off
    Last edited by Ronf; 04-14-2021 at 01:45 PM.

  6. #6
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    If the car is not high end, expensive or not “that” important, there is no need to strip to the metal...waste of effort and time...

    If the clear delaminates, stone chips, sand the clear coat off if possible without “ digging in” too much and less time featheedging....some stone chips can be filled with easy sanding putty and then while semi hard, scrape the excess off with razor blade then let cure and sand with 320 or higher...


    Now after sanding, if damage excessive, use DTM dirert to metal primer sufracer, many branda out there, spray IT, let IT cure, sand and then decibeli if ok, no Sealer, if not, sela IT...

    Or you can do it Quicker with wet on wet, apply 1-3 coats of sealer as smooth as possible, let it flash, 30 min -60 min, inspect for any dirt, sand , then shoot base right away...


    That is how I do it for quick jobs, I love wet on wet applications as it removes possibility of burn trus to the metal, no sanding, no dust...

    I use sealer prior to base often now, lt saves on paint, the paint is getting crazy expensive.it provides uniform surface, removes many problems and it involves extra 15 min of mixing sealer, shooting it and cleaning guns and extra 1/2 hour of flash time, which I use to do something else....it is like a habit...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Sealer?
    In most cases using a good primer and top coats you can skip the sealer but a "good" dedicated sealer (not epoxy primer) can help you finish hold out and not flatten as it hardens/dries.
    When we do a high end paint job we will sometimes use a high quality sealer because we know it will look the same a year later. Kinda like painting on glass.
    I've always been told that epoxy primer is a sealer, are you saying a dedicated sealer is better?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCCLARK View Post
    I've always been told that epoxy primer is a sealer, are you saying a dedicated sealer is better?
    In most cases epoxy primer is a decent sealer but is slightly more absorbent than a "good" dedicated sealer. The result is slightly different in that the top coat can show a slight difference and IF you're doing a show car finish it pays to go with the good dedicated sealer.

  9. #9
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    i like a dedicated urethane sealer too. it's such a good surface to paint over. i never use thinned epoxy for sealer. some guys like it, but a dedicated sealer is so nice to paint over.
    b marler

  10. #10
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    When we did this Packard we used the best sealer available and it came out perfect and lasted forever.




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