TheCoatingStore.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Rocker panel fix question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    20

    Default Rocker panel fix question

    The passenger side outer rocker panel on my 66 Mustang sustained some damage before I acquired it. Looking at the damage I'm wondering if it would be easier or better to try and pull the dent as best I can or have the rocker panel replaced. It looks like the inner panel is not damaged and looking at the inside of car I can see no damage to floor or seat riser. I do have a stud welder from HF that I could use to try and pull it but it seems to be some pretty heavy metal and I'm not sure if a stud welder will be able to do the job. And I know the old method of drilling a hole and using the screw/slide hammer is an option. From what I've researched replacing the outer rocker panel is quite a job...something that is beyond my capability (I'm not a welder) so I would have to rely on a body shop to do it...$$$!!!!
    What are your thoughts??
    3ACCC662-0F09-4808-BFB9-79AF64B50402.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    The passenger side outer rocker panel on my 66 Mustang sustained some damage before I acquired it. Looking at the damage I'm wondering if it would be easier or better to try and pull the dent as best I can or have the rocker panel replaced. It looks like the inner panel is not damaged and looking at the inside of car I can see no damage to floor or seat riser. I do have a stud welder from HF that I could use to try and pull it but it seems to be some pretty heavy metal and I'm not sure if a stud welder will be able to do the job. And I know the old method of drilling a hole and using the screw/slide hammer is an option. From what I've researched replacing the outer rocker panel is quite a job...something that is beyond my capability (I'm not a welder) so I would have to rely on a body shop to do it...$$$!!!!
    What are your thoughts??
    3ACCC662-0F09-4808-BFB9-79AF64B50402.jpg
    A closer or larger pic would have been nice as the rocker looks like it has been previously replaced, however from what I see a stud welder using the medium size pins will pull that dent with little problem. Work several pins at a time. For instance, weld pins in the deepest portion of dent and a few pins in the lower areas. Start with the deep crevice, attach pull pin and immediately shrink weld pin with wet rag as soon as pin is attached as to shrink the metal, once cool pull pin just a little (maybe .125-.250"). Then go to the outer most area and start welding pins, cooling and pulling pins. When a dent occurs it stretches the metal in a particular direction so you will have to pull and shrink the metal from that same impact direction as you go. You would benefit from a shrinking tip for your stud welder to accomplish this shrinking. Shrinking tips for a stud welder are cheap and easy too use.

    All this is assuming there is no damage beyond the rocker panel and frame/unibody is straight and square. I always measure frames for squareness when starting a new project as this is your foundation for a good build.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thank you. It is original sheet metal. You can actully see the stamped date codes. I will take you advice and work it out with stud welder.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    The passenger side outer rocker panel on my 66 Mustang sustained some damage before I acquired it.
    3ACCC662-0F09-4808-BFB9-79AF64B50402.jpg
    Just curious, how does just the rocker get hit like this, jumping a curb, rock crawling, forklift hitting it?
    Not trying to be funny, but seriously, this is an odd hit if nothing else was damaged no?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S-C View Post
    Just curious, how does just the rocker get hit like this, jumping a curb, rock crawling, forklift hitting it?
    Not trying to be funny, but seriously, this is an odd hit if nothing else was damaged no?
    I found this curious as well. How do you dent a rocker only without sustaining any door, frame and/or floor damage? I've repaired many such projects over the years and on early model Mustangs they almost always involve the door. I've even seen complete torque boxes cut away as to make room for SM repairs. If it was in my shop I would do a quick string drop frame alignment that was triangulated to make sure frame is correct +- .125 .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    886

    Default

    As I said you would benefit from a shrinking tip during this repair. Typically when the metal pushes in you will get a bulge around the crevice, shrink this down with a shrinking tip on your stud welder


    http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/m...egory_Code=2SW
    Last edited by Ronf; 04-04-2021 at 04:50 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,609

    Default

    Tie it to a plum tree and start pulling..

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    44,331

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    Tie it to a plum tree and start pulling..
    Is a plum tree better than an apple tree? Hmmmm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,609

    Default

    We had a plum and a pine tree back home in our yard...plum tree was for smaller hits ..

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    We had a plum and a pine tree back home in our yard...plum tree was for smaller hits ..
    Funny Baubau

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    29,995

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    The passenger side outer rocker panel on my 66 Mustang sustained some damage before I acquired it. Looking at the damage I'm wondering if it would be easier or better to try and pull the dent as best I can or have the rocker panel replaced. It looks like the inner panel is not damaged and looking at the inside of car I can see no damage to floor or seat riser. I do have a stud welder from HF that I could use to try and pull it but it seems to be some pretty heavy metal and I'm not sure if a stud welder will be able to do the job. And I know the old method of drilling a hole and using the screw/slide hammer is an option. From what I've researched replacing the outer rocker panel is quite a job...something that is beyond my capability (I'm not a welder) so I would have to rely on a body shop to do it...$$$!!!!
    What are your thoughts??
    3ACCC662-0F09-4808-BFB9-79AF64B50402.jpg
    Stud welder should work with the larger pins (not the small pins). When I look at the larger dent I would start in the center about a 1/2" from the top of the dent and work my way down to the bottom of the dent with as many pins as it takes. Once you get the bulk of the dent pulled out you can fine tune it with more pins working your way out ward from the center. The smaller dent to the right can be pulled any way you want. You shouldn't need a shrinking tip for that rocker. Keep in mind that the top of that dent is high (not low) and it will have to be tapped down with a hammer as you follow what I suggested with the stud welder.

    The metal in that rocker panel is thicker than body panel sheet metal but not that thick. About the same thickness as many truck box sides.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    20

    Default

    I tried the stud welder with the larger pins but they snapped off. Maybe I didn't hold the stud welder on long enough. I'll hold it longer and try again.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    44,331

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    I tried the stud welder with the larger pins but they snapped off. Maybe I didn't hold the stud welder on long enough. I'll hold it longer and try again.

    Another variable is how clean the metal is and the output/quality of the stud welder you're using. A low output tool may not do the trick.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Another variable is how clean the metal is and the output/quality of the stud welder you're using. A low output tool may not do the trick.

    This is dead on. I've never used a HF stud welder so can't comment on it's ability. Using my stud guns I can place them with as much force as I need to pull with regardless of pin size. Like Len says, make sure that metal is clean. I advised to use the medium pins as I don't know if a HF unit can get enough energy into the large pins which can make them snap off when pulling. I think at this point you need to try a "like" gauge metal to weld practice stud pins before getting back on that rocker. While this will take many pins too pull, I always try and keep it to the minimum possible. I try not to over stress the metal when possible. For me personally I only use a hammer to knock the bulge down when I can get a dolly on the back side as over the years I have learned to use the shrinking tip with proficiency (learn too use 1/2 second to 1 or 2 second hits with shrinking tip followed by cooling). On really tight dents I pre heat the metal with a hand torch for a few seconds after placing pins and right before I pull to make the metal more malleable. When heat is applied to metal it aligns the ions straight in the metal which can make for easier pulling.

    Your puller may need a larger pull weight on the slide as well. I use many different size slide weights, just depends on gauge of metal and nature of dent.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    29,995

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    This is dead on. I've never used a HF stud welder so can't comment on it's ability. Using my stud guns I can place them with as much force as I need to pull with regardless of pin size. Like Len says, make sure that metal is clean. I advised to use the medium pins as I don't know if a HF unit can get enough energy into the large pins which can make them snap off when pulling. I think at this point you need to try a "like" gauge metal to weld practice stud pins before getting back on that rocker. While this will take many pins too pull, I always try and keep it to the minimum possible. I try not to over stress the metal when possible. For me personally I only use a hammer to knock the bulge down when I can get a dolly on the back side as over the years I have learned to use the shrinking tip with proficiency (learn too use 1/2 second to 1 or 2 second hits with shrinking tip followed by cooling). On really tight dents I pre heat the metal with a hand torch for a few seconds after placing pins and right before I pull to make the metal more malleable. When heat is applied to metal it aligns the ions straight in the metal which can make for easier pulling.

    Your puller may need a larger pull weight on the slide as well. I use many different size slide weights, just depends on gauge of metal and nature of dent.
    Different size slide weights ?? The stud welder kit comes with one slide hammer with one weight or you can use the one handed pin puller that doesn't use a slide.

    One of the problems with heating the metal up prior to pulling a dent is the odds go way up of ripping the studs right out of the metal you just heated leaving a hole where the pin was. I really don't think using a shrinking tip on the stud welder on thicker metal like a rocker panel damage will do any good.

    On really bad dents/damage on rocker panel thick metal I have used a cut off whizzer wheel to cut the damaged section of the rocker off the car. Hammer and dolly the damage back out then weld it back in the rocker. But like the original poster stated - he's not a welder. so that is out.
    That dent isn't that bad anyway and should pull out pretty easy. That dent is going to take as much use with a hammer as the stud welder pulling pins. The gap between the rocker and door bottom is going to be tight and will need to be widened back out in that damaged area. That in itself can be challenging.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •