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Thread: Need some advice on a repaint

  1. #1

    Default Need some advice on a repaint

    I sprayed my base coat about a week ago. Got too heavy in two areas and had drips. See picture.20210308_131335_resize_28.jpg
    I sanded those down and you can see the under primer. So, another coat of sealer first or paint base coat again?

    Also, the base coat never really gets hard. That makes it hard to sand without a lot of gum on the Sandpaper. What do you correct errors in the basecoat?
    Thanks
    Jerry

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrys paint View Post
    I sprayed my base coat about a week ago. Got too heavy in two areas and had drips. See picture.20210308_131335_resize_28.jpg
    I sanded those down and you can see the under primer. So, another coat of sealer first or paint base coat again?

    Also, the base coat never really gets hard. That makes it hard to sand without a lot of gum on the Sandpaper. What do you correct errors in the basecoat?
    Thanks
    Jerry
    Hi Jerry
    If the paint feathers well and you don't have any edges that need to be buried you should be able to just apply more base on top of the problem. However if it's not feathering well then you might want to scuff then entire panel and apply a coat or two of filler primer, sand and reshoot the base.

    Next time you shoot the base apply a medium coat and allow it to dry some before applying another coat and that should help eliminate the run problem.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrys paint View Post
    I sprayed my base coat about a week ago. Got too heavy in two areas and had drips. See picture.20210308_131335_resize_28.jpg
    I sanded those down and you can see the under primer. So, another coat of sealer first or paint base coat again?

    Also, the base coat never really gets hard. That makes it hard to sand without a lot of gum on the Sandpaper. What do you correct errors in the basecoat?
    Thanks
    Jerry
    I'm guessing you are shooting bc/cc. A non-catalyzed base coat will not get hard or be corrected in the manner you tried, it's the reason you shoot a catalyzed clear coat over it. If you had used a hardner in your base (normally optional) it wouldn't be that hard to fix. At this point I would be tempted to hit the entire panel and lock it down with 2 coats of clear, wait a week and sand your repair area smooth. Re-scuff the entire panel and start again with bc/cc. If you don't lock down that non-catalyzed base it's just going to be a gummy mess. You have the option to chemical strip the panel and start over.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    I'm guessing you are shooting bc/cc. A non-catalyzed base coat will not get hard or be corrected in the manner you tried, it's the reason you shoot a catalyzed clear coat over it. If you had used a hardner in your base (normally optional) it wouldn't be that hard to fix. At this point I would be tempted to hit the entire panel and lock it down with 2 coats of clear, wait a week and sand your repair area smooth. Re-scuff the entire panel and start again with bc/cc. If you don't lock down that non-catalyzed base it's just going to be a gummy mess. You have the option to chemical strip the panel and start over.
    Ron
    Don't you think you can level the existing color and apply more color? If not don't you think that applying a filler primer would do the same thing as clear only be less expensive and less time consuming?

    I realize that the base is made to be cleared but I think scuffing and priming can achieve the same result.

    I'm interested in your approach.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Ron
    Don't you think you can level the existing color and apply more color? If not don't you think that applying a filler primer would do the same thing as clear only be less expensive and less time consuming?

    I realize that the base is made to be cleared but I think scuffing and priming can achieve the same result.

    I'm interested in your approach.
    I think your approach could work, my only draw back is I hate chasing a non catalyzed material that will gum up as you try to level. Seems like I have chased so many mistakes over the years I just don't want to go that route anymore. I absolutely believe in giving your advice a shot with scuffing and priming but for me I wouldn't chase it very long. It certainly couldn't hurt to give it a shot as you will quickly know the results from leveling and primer will absolutely lock that down.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I sanded the whole panel in the morning when it was about 48 degrees. Pretty smooth but I would be more confident with the suggested clearcoats that will give it a hard base to work from.
    Jerry

  7. #7
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    i have found that primer is easier to burn through than clear when fixing these mistakes. on the plus side it's cheaper and can be spotted in easily though. so both methods have merit. i guess i'd have to factor in how well the color hides too. having the original primer color and same number of color coats makes a good match for the other panels. but if the paint covers well it doesn't really matter.
    don't know why i chimed in, you guys had it covered.
    b marler

  8. #8
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    I think there is a third option here that may have been overlooked. From the picture, it looks as though jerrys paint was able to effectively sand and feather out the paint runs. Now, at this point, he could then also shoot a couple coats of intercoat clear over the area in order to seal and fill in the residual sand scratches leaving a nice smooth topcoat for reapplying the base color and then follow-up with his activated finish clear coat.

    In the scenario above, there would be no having to wait for primer, or activated finish clear to dry and then have to sand as suggested by Len & Ronf. In this case, the non activated intercoat clear could be sprayed directly to the prepped surface, wait the appropriate flash time, then reshoot the basecoat color, again waiting the appropriate flash time, then proceed with your activated finish clear

  9. #9
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    These are all good suggestions for the repair. My opinion is mainly based on the product line I use and what the OP probably had on hand in his shop for the repair. Years ago I used a variety of bc/cc product brands and wasn't that particular. Over the years I found some repairs with cheaper products to be an absolute nightmare, while others made for an easy fix of this nature using Lens suggestion, either with or without a primer (depending on existing primer coverage). This scenario is but one of the reasons I try and stay with a single good product line and always catalyze my base. With the product line I use, include the optional catalyzed base, I would have absolutely used Lens method making this solid color a quick and easy repair.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by S-C View Post
    I think there is a third option here that may have been overlooked. From the picture, it looks as though jerrys paint was able to effectively sand and feather out the paint runs. Now, at this point, he could then also shoot a couple coats of intercoat clear over the area in order to seal and fill in the residual sand scratches leaving a nice smooth topcoat for reapplying the base color and then follow-up with his activated finish clear coat.

    In the scenario above, there would be no having to wait for primer, or activated finish clear to dry and then have to sand as suggested by Len & Ronf. In this case, the non activated intercoat clear could be sprayed directly to the prepped surface, wait the appropriate flash time, then reshoot the basecoat color, again waiting the appropriate flash time, then proceed with your activated finish clear
    that's a solid idea, as long as the base was sanded smooth enough to not have scratch marks. i was under the impression jerry was having trouble getting things smooth enough.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    that's a solid idea, as long as the base was sanded smooth enough to not have scratch marks. i was under the impression jerry was having trouble getting things smooth enough.
    bmarler,

    That was my thought as well when he mentioned the sandpaper gums up fast. I also took into consideration he may not having an inter coat on hand and didn't know his budget,

  12. #12

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    I found a new note online about Shopline jbx. It says you can add hardener to the paint if you want. Just has to be the same hardener as the clearcoat on top. That may allow me to spray two coats of color on to fill scratches and then sand that smooth again with 400 Sandpaper. Then one more coat of color followed by clearcoat.
    Anybody tried this?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrys paint View Post
    I found a new note online about Shopline jbx. It says you can add hardener to the paint if you want. Just has to be the same hardener as the clearcoat on top. That may allow me to spray two coats of color on to fill scratches and then sand that smooth again with 400 Sandpaper. Then one more coat of color followed by clearcoat.
    Anybody tried this?
    Yes, absolutely. I always try to use products that use hardener so I don't have to worry about doing corrections if there's an issue.
    Most base coats have an option to use catalyst. Not all though, so you need to be familiar with the product.
    b marler

  14. #14

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    This is a new version of Shopline plus. I have not used it before so the runs were a surprise. I will wait 30 min between coats now and add the catalyst to the base coat.

    Thanks for all your advice. This car has lots of curves so it has been harder to paint for me. The car I just finished was a 62 thunderbird. Huge, but mostly straight panels.
    Jerry

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrys paint View Post
    I found a new note online about Shopline jbx. It says you can add hardener to the paint if you want. Just has to be the same hardener as the clearcoat on top. That may allow me to spray two coats of color on to fill scratches and then sand that smooth again with 400 Sandpaper. Then one more coat of color followed by clearcoat.
    Anybody tried this?
    Just as bmarler stated, yes this will absolutely work and he gives you great advice for a PPG product. I'm not familiar with "a new version of Shopline plus". Personally I like taking down panels to at least 600-800g before final coat but as you will be applying a CC this will come out just fine with 400. Give yourself plenty of time for bc cure before sanding out.

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