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Thread: 3M 05954 Super Duty Rubbing Compound

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    938

    Default 3M 05954 Super Duty Rubbing Compound

    Needing a hard cutting CC compound that replicates 1500g wet, anybody used either the 3M 05954 Super Duty Rubbing Compound or the Meguiar's M10532 Ultra-Cut? results?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,126

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    I use 3M Clear Coat sanding discs on my AirVantage sander. I have a hose running just a small stream of water on the panel. They cut fast and last a long time. I use an interface pad on curved surfaces and remove it for flat areas. Have a rubber squeegee near by and check often. I’ve had bad luck with the course rubbing compound and buffer. It cuts too fast and I have very little control.

    Bob K

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    1,542

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    i'm with bob k on this one. i stopped using coarse compound when i found the finishing film and trizact for the sander. i used to use this stuff i got from the guy that supplied for detail shops. wish i could remember what it was. it was exactly what you're talking about, just like sandpaper. you could see primer in the blink of an eye.
    i'd only use something like that on big open spaces. i bet the 3m will do that.
    b marler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    30,159

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    I've been using 3M Super Duty Rubbing Compound, 05955 rubbing compound for decades and I have found nothing that works as well as it does. I painted a hood on one of my John Deere garden tractors about a month ago with basecoat/clearcoat and final sanded it with 1500. The purple Mystic Cut was taking way too long so I switched to 3-M Super Duty and I had the hood done in 5 minutes. That compound IS coarse so it has to be finished off with a finer compound like Transtar's Tri-Cut compound.

    Another trick using 3-M Super Duty is when you have all the sanding marks buffed out then clean the buffing pad with an air nozzle/air gun to clean most of the compound out of the pad then lightly spray some water on the pad or the panel being buffed and wheel the panel with an RPM of around 1500 revolutions. That will bring up the shine quite a bit. Then finish it off with a different polishing pad and a finer polishing compound.

    If your clearcoat is thin then you could rub through with the 3-M Super Duty but then if the clearcoat is thin and you have sand scratches that aren't coming out then you're going to rub through regardless of what you wheel it out with.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    938

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    Jobber dropped off the 3M 05954 heavy cutting compound and I "think" it did what I needed. A little background on repair; Some of you know I am doing a 36' chevy coupe in Ford Ruby Red tri coat and am in the process of learning how to repair a dark colored tri coat shot without re-shooting an entire car or panel, like say a few SMALL rock chips, etc.. I am still in the learning process for repairing and blending out tri coat repairs . On one of my front fenders I had a few vapor pops that were close together (probably rushed the mid and cc). After trying the usual repair methods for a vapor pop (small detail brush, tooth pic, etc.) and not liking the results I sanded a large portion of the fender down to 1000g wet, re-shot bc onto the small vapor pop area, followed by mid and cc where spray out area is expanded and blended as I went. Finished with a coat of pure reducer over entire area too help blend. After hand blocking repair with 1500g wet followed by trizact 1500 discs wet (effectively 2000 by hand blocking), trizact 3000 and 5000 wet with an inter face pad I had a very distinct line between the new and old cc repair in just one area (weird). I tried going back over this line with 1500 Trizact discs wet and it improved “somewhat”. Every time I tried to polish out that area you could see a distinct color variation line. My thinking is this was from the mid coat that carries base red pigment and pearl and darkened the area. I tried blending this area with various wool and foam pads with both 3M 05974 and Wizards compound. Again, some improvement but not enough. Now, after using the 3M 05954 heavy compound (literally tried to heat and blend the cc) and finishing with 3M 06068 Ultrafine Machine polish it is almost all gone. My only worry is the 3M Ultrafine Machine polish is actually hiding the line and may return. I know this is one long ass post but think it was needed when asking for advice. Anything I could have done different? Know of a better method to blend a dark metallic red tri coat repair?
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    44,633

    Default

    Spot repairs on a tri-coat is a real challenge. My approach would be to fill any divots with clear on a dabber, allow it to harden then level it before the blend attempt.

    To blend I would probably do the same process that you did. I'd blow a thinned base coat over the spot then a thinned mid-coat extending the spot after thinning the mid again then clear. All of this would probably make a one inch problem into a one foot repair. Be sure to use a gun that atomizes REAL WELL and extend all the stages with thinned paint and finalize the clear top coat using only reducer to melt in the edge of the repair.

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