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Thread: Internal rust

  1. #1
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    Question Internal rust

    I'm working on my trunk lid. I've stripped it, mostly, but looking in the stamped holes on the inside, there is considerable surface rust inside the holes on the back of the trunk skin.

    I want to scuff it up with "something" and then I will pour some eastwood encapsulator crap inside the trunk and slosh it around to all the corners. Not perfect, but more than the factory did 50 years ago.

    My question is, what can I use to scuff that inside and get rid of the loose rust? I'm thinking a bottle brush but made of steel wires instead of nylon.... or something

    How would you guys do it? No, removing the trunk skin is not an option.
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  2. #2
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    Default

    We've been using 3m's Cavity Wax with the Applicator Wand Kit. Without the Wand Kit it's very limited but the wand kit allows you to get to those hard to reach places. I'd probably put some paint in those holes before using the cavity wax just to make it look better.


  3. #3
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    Default

    I have the product to put in there, including some of that cavity wax type stuff.

    Im just stumped on how to get in there and scuff up the rust. Is there anything that will work, or is it just wrap a scotch brite around a stick and jam it in best as I can?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    I have the product to put in there, including some of that cavity wax type stuff.

    Im just stumped on how to get in there and scuff up the rust. Is there anything that will work, or is it just wrap a scotch brite around a stick and jam it in best as I can?
    We also use gravel guard which helps hide the roughness and holds up better than just paint, then we paint over the gravel guard.


    If you have loose rust then it should be removed prior to coating with anything. Sometimes a wire brush on a drill works best.




  5. #5
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    Default

    See that's the problem, those holes I showed are maybe 1-1/2 round and like 2 x 4 for the rectangles. Plus the inner structure is within an inch of the outer structure, so I can't get inside there.

    I guess all I can do is scuff what I can and treat it afterwards.

  6. #6
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    Default Consider...

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    See that's the problem, those holes I showed are maybe 1-1/2 round and like 2 x 4 for the rectangles. Plus the inner structure is within an inch of the outer structure, so I can't get inside there.

    I guess all I can do is scuff what I can and treat it afterwards.
    Don't rule out, scuffing as best you can then cleaning the majority of what you loosen not to trap rust dust.

    Anyway, after all is clean (as best you can) don't be afraid to opt for ZERO RUST. You can either spray what you can spray or mix up a batch and pour it in so it sinks into all the cervices. First is to make sure you clean out your factory drains 1/4 inch holes each side of the decklid. This will allow you to let excess ZERO RUST or whatever other liquid to escape.

    If you did it this way, I would not even bother with cavity wax. Listen, this thing is over 50 years old and hasn't rotted yet and won't for you. Plus, the part to be most concerned with is the vertical side that meets the bumper. That would be the first place to rot if anywhere.

    (I know you want it RIGHT but you are getting a little on the ANAL side with this car.)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    Don't rule out, scuffing as best you can then cleaning the majority of what you loosen not to trap rust dust.

    Anyway, after all is clean (as best you can) don't be afraid to opt for ZERO RUST. You can either spray what you can spray or mix up a batch and pour it in so it sinks into all the cervices. First is to make sure you clean out your factory drains 1/4 inch holes each side of the decklid. This will allow you to let excess ZERO RUST or whatever other liquid to escape.

    If you did it this way, I would not even bother with cavity wax. Listen, this thing is over 50 years old and hasn't rotted yet and won't for you. Plus, the part to be most concerned with is the vertical side that meets the bumper. That would be the first place to rot if anywhere.

    (I know you want it RIGHT but you are getting a little on the ANAL side with this car.)
    I try to keep all things anal out of my car just for hygienic reasons, other than that I agree. I'm not trying to sand it clean and bare, I was just hoping there was a bottle brush, flexible doohickey thing to reach up in there to knock down the spider webs, dust and rust.

    I will just wrap a coarse scotch brite pad onto a flexible piece of plastic then I can push it around up in there. Just like wiping your ass with a rag on a stick. Anybody else have back spasms in here? lol

    I think that should knock most of the loose crap off at which point I will be using compressed air on one side and a vacuum down from there to clear it out.

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    This is the stuff I got simply because it came with the little flex nozzle.

    I"m not a big eastwood fan because sometimes it seems they are a little too "Harbor Freight'y" and I question the quality. This is the first of these type products I've ever bought from them, so we will see.

  8. #8
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    Default Honestly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    I try to keep all things anal out of my car just for hygienic reasons, other than that I agree. I'm not trying to sand it clean and bare, I was just hoping there was a bottle brush, flexible doohickey thing to reach up in there to knock down the spider webs, dust and rust.

    I will just wrap a coarse scotch brite pad onto a flexible piece of plastic then I can push it around up in there. Just like wiping your ass with a rag on a stick. Anybody else have back spasms in here? lol

    I think that should knock most of the loose crap off at which point I will be using compressed air on one side and a vacuum down from there to clear it out.

    p12515Z-Internal-Frame-Coat.jpg

    This is the stuff I got simply because it came with the little flex nozzle.

    I"m not a big eastwood fan because sometimes it seems they are a little too "Harbor Freight'y" and I question the quality. This is the first of these type products I've ever bought from them, so we will see.
    Honestly, doing things to something important (or just doing them) mean I want something I can trust. Something tried and true.

    I have followed ZERO RUST for a long time before actually trying it but kept an eye open to members here on what they had to say about it. Results were all positive.

    Then I started asking around and searching this ZERO RUST and became amazed that it is the go to rust preventative paint accepted by MANY STATES for use in BRIDGE REPAIR which I think gets hit with a lot more salt than our driver cars do. That alone has me SOLD hands down.

    Anyway, I tried it and something else I've been playing with on the black 'powder coated frame' of my snow plow. The powder coating started peeling away after many years. Two years ago, I removed what I could and ran some 80 grit over the rust underneath the black paint. Wiped it down with some lacquer thinner, let dry a few hours and buzz bombed with my two products.

    Gotta tell you, it sat outside and plowed snow for two years in my yard with no signs of ANYTHING adverse to the surface. Again, I'm sold and I will buy it from Len as my shop supply guy gets $24.95 a can and Len nearly gives it away by comparison. Now, it's a principle of the thing. My shop supply guy would charge me what Len sells it for but that's not the point. Why put that ridiculous price on it to begin with. (SHHHHhhhhhh - It does work so well that I would pay the higher price for it.

    That stuff you have, I cannot comment on because I never used it but ZERO RUST at least I know works.

    Henry

  9. #9
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    I have sprayed a lot of zero rust. I think it is a great paint. Firewall, core support, bottom of hood and the frame rails are all black zero rust. Nothing against it at all.

    the problem is that the largest opening into that structure is 2" x 4" and there are like 2 or 3 similar in size plus the 1-1/2" holes.

    that was the reason I bought that eastwood stuff with the extension tube, HOWEVER, my question was how to get inside this structure in order to knock loose shit off prior to putting WHICH brand of paint doesn't matter, but my question was HOW TO GET IN THERE TO CLEAN when I have such small windows to the inner part.

    IMG_1932.jpg

  10. #10
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    Default I hear you...

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    I have sprayed a lot of zero rust. I think it is a great paint. Firewall, core support, bottom of hood and the frame rails are all black zero rust. Nothing against it at all.

    the problem is that the largest opening into that structure is 2" x 4" and there are like 2 or 3 similar in size plus the 1-1/2" holes.

    that was the reason I bought that eastwood stuff with the extension tube, HOWEVER, my question was how to get inside this structure in order to knock loose shit off prior to putting WHICH brand of paint doesn't matter, but my question was HOW TO GET IN THERE TO CLEAN when I have such small windows to the inner part.

    IMG_1932.jpg
    Know what? Stop by a plumbing supply house. They have a variety of metal brushes (skinny and long) for oil furnace cleaning people. They are made to get into tight soot caked areas inside of boilers and flex or bend as you need them to. You could probably hook/join a couple together. I think one of mine is at least 18 inches long.

    I would leave the lid in the position you have it. This way, loose crap will fall to where you have the largest opening to get rid of it all.

    Glad to see all the openings in the worst offending areas where any rot might start. At least you can get in all those areas to clean and to paint well.

    You'll get it.

  11. #11
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    Feb 2009
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    Default

    plug holes up and soak with evapo rust

    https://youtu.be/MO4lFxl6oE4

  12. #12
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    Dec 2008
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    Default

    I had this issue with a 68 Mustang trunk lid back in 1988. So I used Eastwoods liquid Rust Converter by pouring some of it in through one of the openings and swished it around before letting it sit for an hour. Poured excess out afterwards. Been fine ever since and will do the same with the 67 Park Lane trunk lid. Only this time I will use Corroseal Rust Converter since it is the same and costs less than Eastwoods stuff. Saw it in use by MARAD on the Reserve Ships and started to use it. We also now use it aboard the USS Hornet for rust conversion before painting.

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