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Thread: Glazing Putty/Fillers

  1. #1
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    Default Glazing Putty/Fillers

    Can anyone recommend some glazing filler products that are good quality and reasonably economical? I don't want to spend $40-50 for a small can if I can avoid it. But obviously it needs to feather edge nicely or there is not much point in using it.

  2. #2
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    Evercoat products can't be beat. Evercoat "Glaze coat" is great but if they still use the white hardener with it, get the blue stuff being you can't see how much you added with the white! But it's literally the exact same stuff as "Metal Glaze" is literally the same stuff only a different color. This is right from the Evercoat tech dept. And you can call them anytime you like, Evercoat is without a doubt one of the best companies I have ever done business with.



    You MUST have a 2K glaze coat, don't even thinking of using a cheaper 1K. This stuff can usually be had for in the $35 range and worth every dime.

    Here's one of my "Basic of Basics" on the subject. http://www.autobodystore.com/ms21.shtml

    Brian
    Touched by an Angel.

  3. #3
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    I've had good luck with the U-pol fillers and glazes also. Dolphin glaze by them is good.

    As Brian said though Evercoat is top notch also.
    Avid collector of rust!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by junk View Post
    I've had good luck with the U-pol fillers and glazes also. Dolphin glaze by them is good.

    As Brian said though Evercoat is top notch also.
    Thanks. I might be using Dolphin now but I'm not certain. I really didn't have any modern product to compare it too. If it exists, I would like something that block sands just a little easier with 150 grit. The truck is straight enough now and I should be able to get away from using 80 grit. I want to begin stepping down as I go through the final blocking and guidecoat steps.

    I have used other Evercoat products in the past and they were always good. Most of my experience with glazing putty is the old lacquer 1K stuff. I know that is a bad idea.

  5. #5
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    Default YGWYPF

    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    Thanks. I might be using Dolphin now but I'm not certain. I really didn't have any modern product to compare it too. If it exists, I would like something that block sands just a little easier with 150 grit. The truck is straight enough now and I should be able to get away from using 80 grit. I want to begin stepping down as I go through the final blocking and guidecoat steps.

    I have used other Evercoat products in the past and they were always good. Most of my experience with glazing putty is the old lacquer 1K stuff. I know that is a bad idea.
    YGWYPF... (you get what you pay for)

    Sometime we have to spend a couple bucks more to get a product that cooperates with what we want it to do.

    Back in the day, I rarely if ever used the old lacquer glazing putty. That was a nightmare that never should have been created. Nitro-Stain as it was called just got you into trouble. AND, you could NOT use it over bondo. You had to use it over primered bondo. Terrible shit.

    What are you working on anyway?

    Henry

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    YGWYPF... (you get what you pay for)

    Sometime we have to spend a couple bucks more to get a product that cooperates with what we want it to do.

    Back in the day, I rarely if ever used the old lacquer glazing putty. That was a nightmare that never should have been created. Nitro-Stain as it was called just got you into trouble. AND, you could NOT use it over bondo. You had to use it over primered bondo. Terrible shit.

    What are you working on anyway?

    Henry
    F100Paint2003.jpg

    I thought I posted this up before but perhaps not. You are looking at a 13 year old pic of an AE job after a 5 year restoration. I didn't really know better then or would not have used AE. The new paint was smoked within 5 years and I started over recently. The goal is absolutely NOT another 5 year resto and I am not particularly efficient at this. I read a filler writeup on this forum and that was a big improvement. Anyway it's a 53 F100. Cab and hood are 60 year old original. The rest is repro sheetmetal. The nature of the stampings really means I could skim coat every inch of the truck but that isn't my intent. Anyway, I am working on the doors and hood. They had a few waves and I want to get them straighter. The truck was very nice before in the opinion of most, but I know where the waves are if I get in the correct light and angle. I did not strip the entire truck again. The cab is a real big deal to strip.

  7. #7
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    Default Oh yes...

    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    F100Paint2003.jpg

    I thought I posted this up before but perhaps not. You are looking at a 13 year old pic of an AE job after a 5 year restoration. I didn't really know better then or would not have used AE. The new paint was smoked within 5 years and I started over recently. The goal is absolutely NOT another 5 year resto and I am not particularly efficient at this. I read a filler writeup on this forum and that was a big improvement. Anyway it's a 53 F100. Cab and hood are 60 year old original. The rest is repro sheetmetal. The nature of the stampings really means I could skim coat every inch of the truck but that isn't my intent. Anyway, I am working on the doors and hood. They had a few waves and I want to get them straighter. The truck was very nice before in the opinion of most, but I know where the waves are if I get in the correct light and angle. I did not strip the entire truck again. The cab is a real big deal to strip.
    Yes, I do remember seeing your truck before.

    You do need to get down to a solid substrate.

    Take your time and work one panel at a time. Learn to block sand properly and good luck with it.

    Henry

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    Yes, I do remember seeing your truck before.

    You do need to get down to a solid substrate.

    Take your time and work one panel at a time. Learn to block sand properly and good luck with it.

    Henry
    It's really too cold to paint here now so I have the rest of winter to finish blocking it. Anywhere there was the slightest hint of substrate failure I stripped. I feel confident I can block well enough to know when it ic straight. Accomplishing that in 3 steps instead of 7 is where I needed most improvement. The write up really did help.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fenders View Post
    Thanks. I might be using Dolphin now but I'm not certain. I really didn't have any modern product to compare it too. If it exists, I would like something that block sands just a little easier with 150 grit. The truck is straight enough now and I should be able to get away from using 80 grit. I want to begin stepping down as I go through the final blocking and guidecoat steps.

    I have used other Evercoat products in the past and they were always good. Most of my experience with glazing putty is the old lacquer 1K stuff. I know that is a bad idea.
    We stopped using 1K glazing products a long time ago because they tend to absorb solvent then shrink as the finish ages showing scratches or dulling the finish. The better/more modern method is to use either a polyester putty or a high quality, fine grain body filler like Rage Ultra, then just use a good 2K primer before painting. The poly putty tends to be more liquid and spreads more easily.


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    We stopped using 1K glazing products a long time ago because they tend to absorb solvent then shrink as the finish ages showing scratches or dulling the finish.
    Thanks Len. I haven't used any 1K for decades either. It shrank everytime to some degree.

    Truck has plenty of 2K glaze on it now under the last paint. I remember it came with orange hardener. Probably an Evercoat or Dynatron product as that is what my jobber sold back then. It didn't shrink so I will leave it be.

  11. #11

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    I know this is an old thread but I have a question. After reading some of the advice here I realize that I should not have used 1K glazing putty. I should use 2K. I filled a few pinholes with the 1K stuff. Not very big areas...maybe a couple inches in area. Should I remove the 1K glaze and go with 2K? Is there an easy way to remove the 1K glaze? Also how long does it take for this stuff to dry??

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    I know this is an old thread but I have a question. After reading some of the advice here I realize that I should not have used 1K glazing putty. I should use 2K. I filled a few pinholes with the 1K stuff. Not very big areas...maybe a couple inches in area. Should I remove the 1K glaze and go with 2K? Is there an easy way to remove the 1K glaze? Also how long does it take for this stuff to dry??
    I've never used 1K putty but you can bet it's not as good as the 2K. My guess is that you could sand it down and apply some of the 2K on top or replace the 1K all together.

  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    I know this is an old thread but I have a question. After reading some of the advice here I realize that I should not have used 1K glazing putty. I should use 2K. I filled a few pinholes with the 1K stuff. Not very big areas...maybe a couple inches in area. Should I remove the 1K glaze and go with 2K? Is there an easy way to remove the 1K glaze? Also how long does it take for this stuff to dry??
    i would absolutely remove the 1k glaze. it's essentially just thick lacquer primer. it'll continue to shrink as it ages and the scratch marks or pin holes will show through. working with 2k glaze isn't as convenient as 1k but it's leaps and bounds better. expect it to cure at around the same rate as your regular filler.
    b marler

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