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69-er
06-27-2013, 12:06 PM
I believe I have read that the clear coat products we use are the products we need to be especialy careful with as far as iso's are concerned. What about the other products we use, like primers, sealers and the base coats? Are they as toxic as the clears? Or is it the fact if they are two-part then I need to be careful? If they are different, would someone please rate them in the order of the hazard?

Thanks!

Larry

Len
06-27-2013, 01:15 PM
I believe I have read that the clear coat products we use are the products we need to be especialy careful with as far as iso's are concerned. What about the other products we use, like primers, sealers and the base coats? Are they as toxic as the clears? Or is it the fact if they are two-part then I need to be careful? If they are different, would someone please rate them in the order of the hazard?

Thanks!

Larry

If it's an automotive product (and other paint products) with a hardener it will most likely contain ISOs and you should take the proper precautions. Other paint products without hardeners are also harmful so use care with whatever you spray.

Phil V
06-28-2013, 10:22 AM
I believe I have read that the clear coat products we use are the products we need to be especialy careful with as far as iso's are concerned. What about the other products we use, like primers, sealers and the base coats? Are they as toxic as the clears? Or is it the fact if they are two-part then I need to be careful? If they are different, would someone please rate them in the order of the hazard?

Thanks!

Larry

An exception to the two part paint/primer products and iso's is epoxy primer. It does not use iso based hardeners like 2K high fill primer, urethane clears and single stage urethanes. Basecoats as a general rule do not use iso additives but that is not always the case depending the brand and choice of basecoat.

Like Len said, NONE of it is good for you to breathe, so use proper precautions to protect yourself regardless of what you are spraying.

Roger V
07-05-2013, 09:34 PM
Does PPG's epoxy DPLF and catalyst specifically not have ISO's? While you may have to be a chemist to understand their sheets, it doesn't specifically say no ISO's.

Len
07-05-2013, 10:01 PM
Does PPG's epoxy DPLF and catalyst specifically not have ISO's? While you may have to be a chemist to understand their sheets, it doesn't specifically say no ISO's.

The MSDS info will usually say what the materials have in them not what they don't. Like Phil said epoxy primer usually doesn't have isos but it's still dangerous and you should protect yourself when you use it. Filler primers, on the other hand, will usually have isos if they have a hardener added.

tbm3fan
07-06-2013, 01:29 AM
Does PPG's epoxy DPLF and catalyst specifically not have ISO's? While you may have to be a chemist to understand their sheets, it doesn't specifically say no ISO's.

Read the container instead. Looking at the DCX-61 hardener you will see that every other word, in ingredients, is either isocyanate or diisocyanate. Off the top of my head I don't recall that about the 401 or 402 catalyst for DPLF.

Roger V
07-06-2013, 10:47 AM
Thanks. I prefer to use DPLF but didn't know enough if ISO's would be spelled-out or whether the stated chemicals "were" ISO's. There are other brands of epoxy which specifically said no ISO's. I understand that probably anything coming out of a paint can is not healthy, BUT if it wasn't ISO laden am I safe with a charcoal mask vs. fresh air supply that is, in my opinion, necessary for ISO's? I don't have DPLF here to read the label as I want the info before buying whatever brand. Hopefully, this explains what/why I'm wanting.

Phil V
07-07-2013, 10:12 AM
Thanks. I prefer to use DPLF but didn't know enough if ISO's would be spelled-out or whether the stated chemicals "were" ISO's. There are other brands of epoxy which specifically said no ISO's. I understand that probably anything coming out of a paint can is not healthy, BUT if it wasn't ISO laden am I safe with a charcoal mask vs. fresh air supply that is, in my opinion, necessary for ISO's? I don't have DPLF here to read the label as I want the info before buying whatever brand. Hopefully, this explains what/why I'm wanting.

I don't mean this in a smart ass way but if you are going to stay away from paint products that are isocyanate based hardeners because of the iso's then you need to find a different hobby.

ALL the best primers and single stage/clearcoat urethane paints available today are iso hardened.

Dual charcoal painters masks work fine to spraying 2K high fill urethane primers (iso hardened) as long as you use the dual charcoal cannister painters mask properly. If you don't know how to use it properly then do some research on this site in the archives of past messages posted about charcoal cannister painters masks.

The only two part paint/primer product for automotive paint/primer that I know off the top of my head that doesn't use iso based hardeners is epoxy primers and paints. ALL the ones I have used do NOT use iso based hardeners, Eposy is a whole different techonology compared to iso hardened urethane products (primers and topcoats.).

Roger V
07-07-2013, 11:54 AM
Phil, thanks & I don't take it in a s/a way. While I've painted a few cars over the last fifty years, it isn't really my hobby. In this particular instance I'm jobbing out the paint job but the painter wanted me to epoxy some areas that would be covered by parts before I install them. Didn't mean to overextend this thread.

Henry
11-21-2013, 11:19 AM
Didn't mean to overextend this thread.

There is no quota of posts or words you are allowed. Say what you need to say and ask what you need to ask. Our interaction is how we and others learn.

Henry