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Thread: How Can you blend single stage????

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    88

    Question How Can you blend single stage????

    I have a gentleman who wants me to paint his fenders and rearend on his 37 Ply.. The color is PPG lavender single stage urethane. Can I blend the rear area into the surronding area and then colorsand it? Will I have dry spots? What should I charge to paint 4 fenders and the rear trunklid? Now he wants me to also paint the hood,I am not sure what to charge to do this or if he wants a total repaint how much should I charge? Can I have some feedback and opinions. I read this board frequently and have learned LOTS over the years. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,079

    Default

    If you're painting the front AND rear fenders as well as the hood and trunk then it would probably be best to just paint the entire car. If the paint is in good shape and you just need to scuff and shoot, I'd say the price would start at $3000 and increase depending on the value of your time and how close a friend he is.

    Blending single stage urethane is a little tricky but when the proper prep is done and the paint is applied properly it usually comes out well.

    For blending we usually sand the repair area with 600 and the blend area (and beyond) with 1200 or 1500. We apply the color over the repair until we achieve coverage then over-reduce the color, extend (blend) the area, then empty the cup and pour in a little SLOW reducer and dust it on the blended edge. When a new painter dusts the slow reducer on the blend they almost always apply too much and cause the blended color to break loose. This usually necessitates the entire newly painted area to be repainted.

    The most important part of blending single stage and clear is that the new paint be allowed to FULLY harden before it's polished. I usually color sand the heavily painted area but only lightly sand the blend before I polish. If the paint isn't fully hardened the blend will break back and cause a visible repair.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    256

    Default

    That actually sounds like a total PITA. My new Tundra is a white SS, and it's got a small boo-boo in the front already.:mad:

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barthmonster
    That actually sounds like a total PITA. My new Tundra is a white SS, and it's got a small boo-boo in the front already.:mad:
    White is a little more forgiving because the edge of the blend doesn't need to be as perfect and you won't see any slight problems.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Mooresville (Race City USA), NC
    Posts
    20

    Default Fully Hardened?

    Len -
    I just did a touch up as per your suggestion, but being a noob, I don't know how long it takes for the PPG DCC SS to fully harden.

    How long should I wait? (I used the slow reducer (DT895) and the outdoor temp was about 70 degrees.)

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I would think that you could pull the fenders and deck lid off that 37 and paint them individually. That might be the best advantage to a single stage paint, unless it is a metallic and then it probably will require complete repaint. Not sure about your color and whether you can match the old paint. You will have no blend lines if you take it apart.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by desert_buick
    Len -
    I just did a touch up as per your suggestion, but being a noob, I don't know how long it takes for the PPG DCC SS to fully harden.

    How long should I wait? (I used the slow reducer (DT895) and the outdoor temp was about 70 degrees.)

    Thanks
    While you're spraying the reducer and temperature are important however the cure time will depend on the temperature AFTER you paint. If the temperature of the new paint is kept at 70 degress F or higher I would wait at least 4 or 5 days before buffing. If the temperature drops below 70 it can take weeks before it's fully cured. This is one good thing about a heat lamp, you can heat the surface up to 140 for 8 hours and it's fully cured but without this tool you're at the mercy of the elements and/or the shop heater.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Dundalk, MD
    Posts
    264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len
    If you're painting the front AND rear fenders as well as the hood and trunk then it would probably be best to just paint the entire car. If the paint is in good shape and you just need to scuff and shoot, I'd say the price would start at $3000 and increase depending on the value of your time and how close a friend he is.

    Blending single stage urethane is a little tricky but when the proper prep is done and the paint is applied properly it usually comes out well.

    For blending we usually sand the repair area with 600 and the blend area (and beyond) with 1200 or 1500. We apply the color over the repair until we achieve coverage then over-reduce the color, extend (blend) the area, then empty the cup and pour in a little SLOW reducer and dust it on the blended edge. When a new painter dusts the slow reducer on the blend they almost always apply too much and cause the blended color to break loose. This usually necessitates the entire newly painted area to be repainted.

    The most important part of blending single stage and clear is that the new paint be allowed to FULLY harden before it's polished. I usually color sand the heavily painted area but only lightly sand the blend before I polish. If the paint isn't fully hardened the blend will break back and cause a visible repair.
    Most people dont like to use it, but PPG has a universal blender, DX840. Dupont has one and so does Sherwin Williams. Ive used all three, and personally, if it is possible to use it, i prefer to, as it is basically a reducer with a very low solid content, making it MUCH cheaper then fully clearing or coloring (single-stage) panels that do not need more product.
    This blender can actually be used to do a SPOT PAINT in the middle of a panel, hence cutting the refinish time to as low as 1/4 of the full refinish time.
    I MUST WARN YOU!!!! Do not attempt to do a SPOT REFINISH on a custmers car. This is a technique that takes alot of practice. I've done a few jobs like this, only one of which i was satisfied with. the other couple, i wound up having the customer bring the car back to REDO, which wound up costing the shop twice as much in the long run, as i nearly had to strip the section that had fresh clear to avoid any lifting/wrinkling issues.

    try this on an old fender or something...if it seems like it isnt going to look right when its dry, it probably wont. THIS IS TECHNICALLY CHEATING, so unless you need to get the job out the door like yesturday, just go ahead and do it the right way to avoid problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Winchester, Ma
    Posts
    138

    Default

    I would like to try this technique. I am currently fixing a rust area on a rear fender. The car has factory base/clear paint. I will be using a PPG single stage lacquer in a rattle can. What is the best way to go about blending the area?

    Should I fill my paint gun with a little reducer I have laying around and try this technique to spray the feather edge of the blend? Or should I pick up that universal blender? do they make it in rattle cans ?

    I should prolly try this on a practice piece before hand huh ?

    any extra tips ?

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