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Thread: Painting Over Old Paint

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aurora, CO
    Posts
    30

    Default Painting Over Old Paint

    Is it possible to prepare the original faded finish on a 1970 Ford product (acrylic enamel?) and seal it so it can be newly painted without having to strip the body down to bare metal first? The reason I ask is that my '70 Falcon has very faded paint, and has never been repainted. I want to repaint the car, but was hoping to not have to strip it to bare metal. If so, what products would you recommend from start to finish? I've included a link to a photo of the car to give you an idea of the fading. I'm a novice with this so please go easy on me.

    http://photos.thetreasureleague.com/...n/PICT0640.JPG

    Thanks,
    Otto...
    1970 Falcon standard two door sedan
    http://photos.thetreasureleague.com/1970_Falcon.htm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    323

    Default

    That is a bodyman's dream of a car to restore ! Wow, and from a painting standpoint if it is AE then you just need to scuff and seal with a waterborne sealer like PPG makes. Check with your paint supplier on which product is recommended for sealing AE for Urethane application..................best of luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,707

    Default The problem with oxydized paint...

    Oxydized paint is not a very good base for a paint job. Although you would probably do allright with an epoxy as a sealer I would recommend sanding it down to metal...

    Its not that big of a job, you have to sand it anyway and the results will be much nicer and the results will stay nice for a long time.

    Frankly, I can get this car disassembled, down to bare metal and primed in one week-end if there are no serious body work to be done...then you are going to live with the results for a long time...what's 2 days...and it will give you an idea of what's under that paint. Sometimes we find some surprises...

    Take a look at this stripping tool...
    http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/m...gory_Code=SPAR

    With a buffer you can strip the car in a day...(and give your shoulders a good work out...).

    Or, if you don't want to strip it, the quick and dirty way:

    Sand the car with 180 or 220. Then a good surfacing epoxy (House of kolor KD2000 or Valspar DTM2004 or equivalent) 2 or 3 coats or a tie coat of epoxy (PPG's DPLF) and 2 or 3 coats of surfacer (PPG K36). Then let it sit in primer for a couple of weeks in a warm garage, the warmer the better. This will let the paint evaporate any solvants that were absorbed in the old coating. Then final sand the car and paint.

    I don't recommend simply sanding the car, sealing it and then paint in one step. The old paint will re-absorb much solvants from the sealer and will likely shrink afterwards. Giving it time to shrink in surfacing primer and THEN sanding it will create a more stable base for the top coat. The fully cured primer will then act as a barrier when you final paint the car...
    My 2 cents worth...
    Serge

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aurora, CO
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Serge, stealth1,

    Thanks for the input. I'm still getting conflicting advice from various sources on whether to strip to bare metal, or not. So far it's about 50-50 to strip, or to sand, seal and build up from there. No decision yet.

    I did find a couple of places I can rent a spray booth from. One seemed a bit high at $200 for 24 hours whether I use all 24 hours or not. The other is $25 per hour with a two hour minimum, and $20 per hour for five, or more, hours. The second one is fairly close to where I live, and I liked the rate. I can't imagine using more than a couple of hours at a time for the various processes. Any thoughts?

    I still want to do most, if not all, of the work myself. Not so much for the savings, if any, but more for the satisfaction and pride of doing it myself. I'm thinking about picking up a fender or door to practice with. I like the idea of being able to sand my current finish, do the body work that's necessary, then seal/prime/build-up surfacer, block sand, prime, block sand (for how ever many iterations) and then final color. Don't know which products to use at this point, but I guess I will learn. It might also be that I do, in fact, strip before following up with the other steps. I wish this decision wasn't so difficult, but I'm in no hurry. The end result is more important than when it gets done.

    Any other input, or suggestions, are welcomed.

    Thanks again,
    Otto...
    1970 Falcon standard two door sedan
    http://photos.thetreasureleague.com/1970_Falcon.htm

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