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Thread: Capt. Lee's Spra' Strip

  1. #1
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    Default Capt. Lee's Spra' Strip

    Capt. Lee's Spra' Strip and metal prep has any body ever used this stuff. got a buddy that uses it to strip paint on fibrerglass but had no use for the metal prep so when i striped some of the roof on my 69mustang i was getting a little flash rust so i scotch pad the rust off and put the metal prep on and that was 4 months ago and it seems to be doing a good job

    Thanks Joe

  2. #2
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    Captain Lee's has been around for awhile but their products may be the best things you never heard of. Absolutely no marketing to speak of.

    It seems the Metal Prep is working for you as it's advertised. Good to know.

    Greg
    Thoughts and comments expressed by me are mine based on my own experience and research and shared here freely. I am not a professional nor make any claim to be as such

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by f4ujmb
    Capt. Lee's Spra' Strip and metal prep has any body ever used this stuff. got a buddy that uses it to strip paint on fibrerglass but had no use for the metal prep so when i striped some of the roof on my 69mustang i was getting a little flash rust so i scotch pad the rust off and put the metal prep on and that was 4 months ago and it seems to be doing a good job

    Thanks Joe
    We just used Capt. Lee's to strip a Vette and it worked quite well. Just get it off before it dries or it's gets like dry cement. Also we suffered from exposure to the fumes when we started using it so be sure to protect yourself or use it outdoors. I used it to strip a panel outdoors and STILL had a bad reaction. I'd recommend a supplied air breathing system when using this stripper.

  4. #4
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    Hi Len - i am also working on a vette - and i note the noxious nature of the product for paint stripping - can you recommend other methods of stripping paint from fiberglass (and more particularly, from a corvette body) - either mechanical, chemical or both! - many thanks, ed

  5. #5
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    EDL.
    I personally sand the paint off all the Vettes I do. I use a DA and start with 40 grit to remove all clear and color. Then I switch to 80 grit on the DA to remove all primer down to the bare glass.. Then do all your body work and finish it and re sand the body with 120 grit. I've been doing it this way for the last 25 years of the 31 I've been professionally restoring Corvettes. I used to chemically strip them, but I find this a much better way. Just take your time with the DA so as not to ruin any body lines.

    Hope this helps

    Dan

  6. #6
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    I only used the stripper on a front fender from the 69 mustang im restoring .It seem to strip the top layers of paint off real well but when i got to the factory paint not so good I agree the fumes were harsh and i had the doors open. I think its time i invest in a breathing system .

    Thanks Joe

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by edl
    Hi Len - i am also working on a vette - and i note the noxious nature of the product for paint stripping - can you recommend other methods of stripping paint from fiberglass (and more particularly, from a corvette body) - either mechanical, chemical or both! - many thanks, ed
    Chemical stripper works best on glass because of the soft nature of the structure. Sanding the paint off with power sanders causes irregularities in the surface that then need repaired before it's painted. Plastic media blasting can work if you have someone that has good equipment and really knows what they're doing.

    I've found that stripping with chemicals causes the least amount of damage but you need to protect yourself from breathing the fumes and from touching the chemicals. We stripped using every way but dipping and through these many cars we've learned to use chemical stripper on fiberglass and sanding on metal cars.

  8. #8
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    Another good paint stripper is MAR-HYDE TAL-STRIP II it is a fluorescent green color, anyway I was able to completely remove the paint to bare metal from a corrugated cargo floor and roof with just 3/4 of a quart can.It is a good idea to use the stuff outdoors the fumes are noxious.Mike

  9. #9
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    hi guys - follow on questions if using Captain Lee's:

    1. Is there more than one "model"? - what is the one most recommended for fiberglass.

    2. some say clean with "acetone" others say "lacquer thinner" - forgive the ignorance...are these the same? - if they differ, is one better than the other?

    3. i have read that there is one CL model that can be washed with water - is that true? - which one is that? - is that as effective as the presumably more caustic formulations?

    4. i have read CL is not good for original lacquer paint (perhaps all old oem paints) - why is that? - is there an application method that makes it more effective? - like covering the area you are working on with plastic sheeting?

    5. i have read that CL on fiberglass can be damaging if left on too long - how do you know when it is "soup"? - is it a strict time issue - or do you wait until you see a sign...bubbling? color change?

    6. regarding the saran wrap, i think there was another thread on this forum that this was a way to keep the noxious fumes down - does that work? - and when we say noxious...like paint hardeners, voc's that require a fresh air system? - or just a two filter half mask?

    7. i read alot about stripping down to primer, but not bare glass (in general not with this product in particular) - does that apply here? - if you have to sand the last bit, doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the chemical process - this may be a corvette specific issue, as sanding can take away edges and contours.

    Can you say beat a dead horse!

    thanks - ed
    Last edited by edl; 03-11-2008 at 07:51 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by edl
    hi guys - follow on questions if using Captain Lee's:

    1. Is there more than one "model"? - what is the one most recommended for fiberglass.

    2. some say clean with "acetone" others say "lacquer thinner" - forgive the ignorance...are these the same? - if they differ, is one better than the other?

    3. i have read that there is one CL model that can be washed with water - is that true? - which one is that? - is that as effective as the presumably more caustic formulations?

    4. i have read CL is not good for original lacquer paint (perhaps all old oem paints) - why is that? - is there an application method that makes it more effective? - like covering the area you are working on with plastic sheeting?

    5. i have read that CL on fiberglass can be damaging if left on too long - how do you know when it is "soup"? - is it a strict time issue - or do you wait until you see a sign...bubbling? color change?

    6. regarding the saran wrap, i think there was another thread on this forum that this was a way to keep the noxious fumes down - does that work? - and when we say noxious...like paint hardeners, voc's that require a fresh air system? - or just a two filter half mask?

    7. i read alot about stripping down to primer, but not bare glass (in general not with this product in particular) - does that apply here? - if you have to sand the last bit, doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the chemical process - this may be a corvette specific issue, as sanding can take away edges and contours.

    Can you say beat a dead horse!

    thanks - ed
    Laquer thinner will stay wet longer than acetone you use the thinner with clean rags to remove the stripper residue....Most strippers will remove laquer paint easily.....putting saran wrap to cover methly chloride stripper will probably just melt the saran wrap the manufacturer puts wax in the stripper to float to the top and keep it wet..stripper will soften fiberglass if left on too long get the paint off then clean the bare glass of stripper residue while the stripper is still wet.. paint is removed layer by layer dont expect the paint to just fall off you need a nylon bristle brush and fine steel wool to assist the stripper. Mike

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Dry
    putting saran wrap to cover methly chloride stripper will probably just melt the saran wrap the manufacturer puts wax in the stripper to float to the top and keep it wet
    Surprisingly, this has not been the case for me. The Saran Wrap (iirc poly vinylidene choride) does not melt, and works very well for keeping the stripper wet and active much longer than the built-in floating waxes. The first time I tried it I expected to end up with a gooey mess of melted plastic wrap mixed in with the stripper and paint, but instead it just worked. If you use methylene chloride stripper (I mostly use Jasco Premium Paint and Epoxy Remover) I recommend you try the plastic wrap, as it has worked very well for me.

    Harry Phinney

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Phinney
    Surprisingly, this has not been the case for me. The Saran Wrap (iirc poly vinylidene choride) does not melt, and works very well for keeping the stripper wet and active much longer than the built-in floating waxes. The first time I tried it I expected to end up with a gooey mess of melted plastic wrap mixed in with the stripper and paint, but instead it just worked. If you use methylene chloride stripper (I mostly use Jasco Premium Paint and Epoxy Remover) I recommend you try the plastic wrap, as it has worked very well for me.

    Harry Phinney
    Some things are not as they seem, intuitivley you would think it would melt, I trust that it doesnt judging from your experience.Thanks Mike

  13. #13
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    hi guys - follow on questions if using Captain Lee's:

    1. Is there more than one "model"? - what is the one most recommended for fiberglass.

    I'm not sure about different products by CL because I purchased mine from a Corvette parts supplier and that's what they recommended.

    2. some say clean with "acetone" others say "lacquer thinner" - forgive the ignorance...are these the same? - if they differ, is one better than the other?

    3. i have read that there is one CL model that can be washed with water - is that true? - which one is that? - is that as effective as the presumably more caustic formulations?

    We scrubed with soap and water then wiped it down with grease and wax remover.

    4. i have read CL is not good for original lacquer paint (perhaps all old oem paints) - why is that? - is there an application method that makes it more effective? - like covering the area you are working on with plastic sheeting?

    Urethane and acrylic enamel will wrinkle while lacquer will melt but it can still be wiped or scraped off the surface.

    5. i have read that CL on fiberglass can be damaging if left on too long - how do you know when it is "soup"? - is it a strict time issue - or do you wait until you see a sign...bubbling? color change?

    We removed it within about 15 minutes but it can vary with the product you're trying to remove. We found that we needed to apply it a couple times to get the surface really clean.

    6. regarding the saran wrap, i think there was another thread on this forum that this was a way to keep the noxious fumes down - does that work? - and when we say noxious...like paint hardeners, voc's that require a fresh air system? - or just a two filter half mask?

    I would imagine that a cartridge mask may work but we had the supplied air system so we used it. You'll need skin, eye and breath protection no matter if you put plastic on top of the wet CL or not.

    7. i read alot about stripping down to primer, but not bare glass (in general not with this product in particular) - does that apply here? - if you have to sand the last bit, doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of the chemical process - this may be a corvette specific issue, as sanding can take away edges and contours.

    The original primer stopped the stripper on our Vette but a lot of the stripper got through to the glass. It didn't hurt anything that the spray-on filler couldn't correct. We used two gallons of CL.

  14. #14
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    Jan 2008
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    many thanks for this Len - what is weird is that when you go the CL website (http://www.halonmarketing.com/mall/Spra'%20Strip.php), it claims the product is:

    "SAFE: Non-Acid; Non-Toxic; Non-Caustic; Non-Flammable"

    But this does not seem to square with the general consensus here that the fumes will knock you out!!

    What gives?

    thanks - ED

  15. #15
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    Mar 2007
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    A recommendation for a stripper, eco friendly that I've started using quit a bit is Citrus Stripper (orange at box stores and wal-mart). I've used aircraft and other stippers but this stuff is excellent on topcoats. One of the things I like best about it is you can leave it on for 24 hours and it's still moist and workable and the paint doesn't glob up, but actually almost liquifies.

    However, I hasn't worked very well on epoxy primer (or my assumption that it's epoxy primer. primer on a 55 body and wheels). So, based on this, I'd say it would work pretty well on glass though I haven't used it on glass to this point.

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