Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Iwata LPH 400

  1. #1

    Default Iwata LPH 400

    I just purchased an Iwata LPH 400, and was wondering if i could get some input from those of you, who own and have tried the gun. Is there anything that i should be causious about the gun?

  2. #2

    Default LPH 400/Sorry it was covered earlier in the forum.

    I will look in the search box next time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Southern Missouri
    Posts
    426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy MM
    I just purchased an Iwata LPH 400, and was wondering if i could get some input from those of you, who own and have tried the gun. Is there anything that i should be causious about the gun?
    I resently switched shops using a LPH 400. I went from a big compresser, Large air hose to a small air compresser and small air hose. I liked the proformance of the gun much better at the other shop. So I went back to clearing with my nr 2000 until I at least get a bigger air hose. Great gun though. Im glad I have it. It is a clearing son of a gun.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    26,302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 68-chevyman
    I resently switched shops using a LPH 400. I went from a big compresser, Large air hose to a small air compresser and small air hose. I liked the proformance of the gun much better at the other shop. So I went back to clearing with my nr 2000 until I at least get a bigger air hose. Great gun though. Im glad I have it. It is a clearing son of a gun.
    I don't understand, what difference did you see? The Iwata uses very little air and should have performed the same a long as you used an inlet regulator. :confused:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    orlando
    Posts
    181

    Default

    I like my iwata lph400lv and purple lvb cap for base and candy
    I am going to buy w400lv for clear and sell my rp sata:confused:
    it is not always the gun it's the man behind the trigger

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Louisville,KY.
    Posts
    869

    Default

    The difference is pressure loss- you won't have what you think you
    have when you spray, you'll be spraying with less pressure.
    If you run high pressure to the gun and regulate down at the gun
    you can overcome this problem.

    The problem with air supply is usually not the hose,
    it's the 1/4" quick-disconnect fittings.
    Look inside a coupler and you'll notice the opening is less
    than half the size of the hose.
    I switched to 3/8" fittings-big difference.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    26,302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JCCLARK
    The difference is pressure loss- you won't have what you think you
    have when you spray, you'll be spraying with less pressure.
    If you run high pressure to the gun and regulate down at the gun
    you can overcome this problem.

    The problem with air supply is usually not the hose,
    it's the 1/4" quick-disconnect fittings.
    Look inside a coupler and you'll notice the opening is less
    than half the size of the hose.
    I switched to 3/8" fittings-big difference.
    Using a spray gun that uses as little air as an Iwata you shouldn't see any difference even with small fittings as long as you maintain a consistent inlet pressure. This is why I mentioned using an inlet pressure regulator. Actually the only time larger fittings are mandatory would be when the gun uses a greater CFM and/or the hose is 50' or longer. Even with small fittings you should be able to use the LPH400 with no air problems as long as you set the line pressure properly.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    7,629

    Default

    Weve been trough this before. Its a fact that a 3/8" hose with 1/4" couplers will flow around 25 cfm. The Iwata uses about 1/3 of that air so a bigger compressor with larger fittings should be a non issue.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Louisville,KY.
    Posts
    869

    Default

    As long as you set it high at the wall, giving high psi to the gun,
    it's not an issue.
    I put a removeable gage on my gun.
    with the 1/4" fittings I got a 20 to 25 psi drop from the wall with
    the trigger pulled. (3/8" hose, only 25' long)
    I installed the 3/8" fittings and I got only about 6 psi drop from the wall.
    I don't use a regulator on the gun, most impede air flow and don't
    deliver what you think you have, And they usually aren't that accurate.
    That's why most people say their gun sprays better at a higher pressure.
    Measure the drop yourself and you'll be suprised.
    Of course if you run 90 psi to your gun and regulate down, it's not
    an issue. The high PSI overcomes the loss.
    But with the larger fittings I can spray without all that hardware in the
    way, still satisfy my gun cfm. and adjust only at the wall.
    I set it with this then remove it. nothing in the way and I don't have to run
    high pressure through my hoses.And one gage for all guns
    With this gage I measured the differences quickly and easily.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,707

    Default I use the same set-up as JCLARK...

    And I can attest to the difference too...I am set-up with the 3/8 fittings and I also do not use a regulator at the gun. I have a contraption such as the one shown in the pic to set the pressure at the gun, then I unplug it and plug the gun direct...

    I find the 3/8 fittings just bring alot more air and it does make a difference this way.

    Theare are now 1/4 fittings that have the same hole size as the 3/8 fittings, high flow or high volume they are called but they are quite special and I wanted to stay with a standard fitting...

    3/8 realy makes a difference with air tools such as impact guns...
    My 2 cents worth...
    Serge

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Kamloops. B.C.
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    The greatest restriction when regulating at the tank is not the couplers, it's the regulater. Turn your regulater all the way down to 0. Remove your air hose/coupler so you are wide open to the regulater. No air coming out. Slowly turn your regulater up. As the regulater starts to show pressure, air starts to come out of the hose, but very little (volume). As you crank up the regulater the volume or flow will increase along with the pressure. It's because the pressure is regulated by restricting the size of opening in the regulater.

    The problem with regulating before the hoses and couplers is just as you've found. You have such low pressure and volume already that the slightest restriction in the hose or couplers has a significant impact at the appliance. You are now more subject to length of hose as well. Low pressure in the hose makes it easier to crimp when you snag it under a tire or step on it. Stepping on the house will likely alter the pressure at your gun, even if only momentarily.

    So you run your pressure (and subsequently volume) high from the tank so there is lots of cushion for error, restriction etc. If your pressure is then set at the gun it will not vary if you step on the hose, the hose with 125 psi will not kink as easily, will not be effected by coupler size etc.

    As Phil said, 1/4" couplings will flow 25 cfm at 100 psi. Some impacts require more than that (3/4", 1") and require bigger hose and couplings.

    My line pressure is regulated by the cut-off for the motor. I run full line pressure off the tank and regulate at the spray gun. I operate my impacts at 125 psi and have for 35 years without ever a problem though the recomended pressure is 90 psi. If you don't want to run over 90 or 100 pounds, turn down the cut-off and throw away the regulater so that you can get unrestricted volume.
    Steve g

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    26,302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve g
    My line pressure is regulated by the cut-off for the motor. I run full line pressure off the tank and regulate at the spray gun. I operate my impacts at 125 psi and have for 35 years without ever a problem though the recomended pressure is 90 psi. If you don't want to run over 90 or 100 pounds, turn down the cut-off and throw away the regulater so that you can get unrestricted volume.
    Steve g
    Interesting concept. So you're saying that a compressor that puts out say 175 lbs would be regulated at the tool? Man that's a lot of pressure in that hose when you could be getting away with 75 psi and running just about all your tools at that pressure.

    I've actually been of the opposite mind in that I always felt that you could do away with the regulator at the gun and regulate the pressure at the wall and thereby carry a lot less pressure in the hose. Once the needed pressure is established you wouldn't need a regulator at the gun.

    However I've found that it's faster and easier to run 70 or 80 psi at the wall and just dial it down at the tool because it seems to be the best of both theories.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Kamloops. B.C.
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    I find that mot single stage compressors run under 150, usually in the 125 to 135 range. I don't run a regulater at the tank nor at my air tools other than the spray gun. I find that with the pressure loss through hoses etc I'm still probably getting around 100 at the tool. I think all of my tools are rated for 90 and I've never found in 35 years that 10 or so psi to ever be detrimental to the tool. And my impact wrenches really bust nuts.

    Two stage compressors at 175 may be too high to run without a regulater. I really don't know how I would go if my compressor ran that high a pressure. We don't have any tools needing anywhere near that psi. The only advantage that I can see to the high pressure is the added air volume in the same size of tank. But is that additional air volume any good to you if you're going to restrict the flow through a regulater? I guess it's good if you are using a tool with a higher consumption than your compressor has capacity. Gives you longer to work before the tool powers out. I've often wondered why I would want a 2 stage compressor running the same cfm as a lower pressure single stage. Would I not have the same effect by running a single stage, lower pressure, same cfm with a bigger tank? Wish I knew how to do the math/physics. You really only need the second stage to get the air to the higher psi. Recovery time is related to primarily to cfm.

    Not sure what's wrong with running a higher pressure in the hose or why you'd want to get by running lower hose pressure. In my mind you are less likely to get kinking, better opportunity to overcome restrictions due to hose size and couplings etc. I also like the blast I get out of my blow gun at the higher hose pressure. I guess the lower risk of hose rupture might be one.

    As to regulating at the tank vs at the spray gun (the only tool I regulate at all), I believe I may be subject to more variations in pressure as I work, the hose going around a tight bend, the pressure drop if I have to add another hose, which air outlet in the 100' shop I'm plugged into etc. With high pressure (and volume) right to the inlet of the regulater on the gun there are no variables left to alter pressure out the nozzle other than those I adjust.

    These are my thoughts and theories only. My work has been in a mech shop using primarily impact wrenches, ratchets, air chisels, air saw, die ginders and cut off wheels. My spraying and bodywork stuff is hobby. You may find it different for the type of tools you use.
    Steve g

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •