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Thread: How cold is to cold to spray epoxy?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Default How cold is to cold to spray epoxy?

    Yea its that time of year again. I wish i had a detached garage but it don't so does it matter how cold it is when i spray my epoxy primer? I am using DP40LF. I figure it is a chemical reaction that makes it dry so heat would only speed things up. I wont be doing my high build primer and color till spring anyway so i have a long time to wait for it to dry. Are there any tips or tricks for painting in the cold. Should i warm the paint and panel first before painting? I imagine with cold air through the spray gun the paint is going to cool off fast anyway.

  2. #2
    dave_demented Guest

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    i know that you cant spray urethanes below 60 degrees, because they wont harden right. then again i have sprayed epoxy in a 65 degree garage one night, and proceeded to let it dry overnight, got down to like 30 that night and i didnt have any problems

  3. #3
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    At least you got to spray it at 65 i don't think i am going to have that luxury, but i still have a hood and fender that need to be primed before they are left unprotected to long. I think i am going to take the chance and paint it. If something doesn't work right how does it show up. You mentioned the urethane paints do they stay sticky? If i do paint it i want to be sure it is okay before i topcoat in the spring.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    A different state every year
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    if you want to store them until you can get them painted in the spring you can always spray it with rattlecan primer now and sand it back off and apply the epoxy in the spring. If your storing it outside get some plastic sheeting to cover it with

    Edit: or if family or friends has a empty building/garage get an electic heater and get the room to around 75 then spray it and let it cure out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Rochester NY
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    An electric heater running off a 110~115~120V volt circuit won't do squat. Been there are tried it. You can't get more than 1800W that way and UL has those Heaters at less than that.

    I'm in agreement with the 60~65 Temp range. My Nason Ful-Poxy says not to use it shop temp is below 50.

    I'm still working out in my detached one car garage. Other than the Ful-Poxy I've been shooting Dupont URO Primer-Filler. I have a 170,000 btu Kerosene Forced Air Heater than I run. Takes the temps from 40 to 75 in no time.

    Problem is both the Heater needs air while running and I have to exhaust the space when spraying and it doesn't take long nowadays to bring the temp's back down. But the ventilation is good so I can turn the heater on if needed during flash time's and I turn it back on once the final coat is on.


    Greg
    Thoughts and comments expressed by me are mine based on my own experience and research and shared here freely. I am not a professional nor make any claim to be as such

  6. #6

    Default

    I have used dp90 for primer and sealer, and the bottom line on temp is 60. After some discussion with tech peple at ppg, drying stops at 60. I too have painted in a dettached gargage, used a heater to jack up the temp to about 80 then shut it off and shoot. I have no ceiling so I put up plactic to hold the heat down. Used a box fan "filtered" for exhaust. Onced air cleared up turned heat back on, then you have to leave it on for about 16 hrs, or keep it above 60. PPG was very clear about drying stops at 60, be carefull. Hope this helps, best of luck...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NC
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    The thing with epoxy is the metal temp not the air temp. The air could be 80 degrees but if the metal temp is only 50 you will still see a hardening issue. The best method that was explained to me was find some infrared heaters (northern tool used to have them) and monitor the metal temp til it gets above 70 degrees. Once it does turn the heat off and goto spraying. Let the area vent for about 1/2 hr then turn the heaters back on for about 4 hrs.
    I have used this method over the last 2 winters and have had no problems sofar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    27,051

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    Usually the only way the temperature of the metal is a lot different than the air is if the car has recently changed environments. If the car has been inside at a constant temperature overnight it should be relatively the same temp at the air or at least within a couple degrees. However if you pull the car inside after being outdoors in the cold the metal could stay too cold to prime or paint for several hours. We constantly use a non-contact thermometer to measure the temperature of the surface before painting and while we are adjusting our heat lamp distance.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    127

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    I have both those products and find them very useful.
    Very minimal investment for what you get. The heat lamp
    has paid for itself over and over by getting projects
    done faster. I even cure my poly primer with it sometimes.
    I find the thermometer really useful at break in of a new engine.
    Plus it's great fun putting a red laser dot on peoples foreheads
    and chests in darker public places.

    Larry

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mick75
    I have used dp90 for primer and sealer, and the bottom line on temp is 60. After some discussion with tech peple at ppg, drying stops at 60. I too have painted in a dettached gargage, used a heater to jack up the temp to about 80 then shut it off and shoot. I have no ceiling so I put up plactic to hold the heat down. Used a box fan "filtered" for exhaust. Onced air cleared up turned heat back on, then you have to leave it on for about 16 hrs, or keep it above 60. PPG was very clear about drying stops at 60, be carefull. Hope this helps, best of luck...
    Thanks for the information. It is supposed to get to 60 tomorrow so maybe i can shoot it then. Otherwise i will put it in by the wood stove for the night. (that should get the metal to between 80 and 90) Then pull it out side for an hour or two to paint it and then bring it in the garage to let it dry the rest of the day.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NJ
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    Default

    I was told by PPG that Concept needs to be above 55* during the cure time. If it drops below 55* the chemical reaction that cross links the molecules stops and does not restart. So you need to keep it warm over night.

    While many have reported that their paint appears fine when painted cold, can you be really sure it will be ok in the long term?

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