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Thread: Is this the correct filler for urethane bumpers?

  1. #1
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    Question Is this the correct filler for urethane bumpers?

    Newb here, I usually find my answers by searching, but didn't get a definite answer this time. Sorry if I missed something obvious. I need to fill in the recessed euro tag area on a flexible urethane front bumper, possibly up to a 1/4" deep. I'm sure the bumper is urethane. I went to urethanesupply.com, and found "flex-filler 2" which seems like the right stuff. My questions are: 1. How high can I safely build the filler without worrying about cracking, peeling etc, 2. How do I prep the bumper properly for the filler? 3. Has anybody used flex-filler 2 or a similar product that they like better for this? 4. Any tips on doing this project? Thanks for a great site with a wealth of knowledge!

  2. #2
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    I'm not familiar with that product so read the label or find the manufacturer's info on the web.

    We have a couple different products for repairing flexible bumpers. If the bumper isn't broken all the way though and all that's needed is cosmetic repairs we use Poly-Flex. We usually grind the damage so that it doesn't have any sharp edges and also has a good scratch for the filler to bond with THEN we fill the low areas with the Poly-Flex.

    Poly-Flex Link


    If the bumper is broken through or has pieces missing I recommend Fusor 114 and Fusor's reinforcing mesh.


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by chanorama
    Newb here, I usually find my answers by searching, but didn't get a definite answer this time. Sorry if I missed something obvious. I need to fill in the recessed euro tag area on a flexible urethane front bumper, possibly up to a 1/4" deep. I'm sure the bumper is urethane. I went to urethanesupply.com, and found "flex-filler 2" which seems like the right stuff. My questions are: 1. How high can I safely build the filler without worrying about cracking, peeling etc, 2. How do I prep the bumper properly for the filler? 3. Has anybody used flex-filler 2 or a similar product that they like better for this? 4. Any tips on doing this project? Thanks for a great site with a wealth of knowledge!
    If I were you I would take a heat gun and flex all of the low out that I could. Then I would wet sand by hand with 180 to the factory primer and stop there. Then I would fill. The poly-flex is the standered. It seems to stick better to primer than raw plastic. I even seal raw plastic with epoxy befor Poly-Flex. But I Think the fac. prim. sticks better than any thing.

    IMO

  4. #4
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    Feb 2006
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    Lightbulb

    Thanks for the quick responses. I probably should mention that its an aftermarket bumper that came with a crappy runny primercoat that I don't trust. I'm going to take it to bare 'thane. In case this helps, Its made of PUR/RIM thermoset polyurethane. The recess is molded in for a europlate, which makes it look like garbage with or without a us tag. I'm hoping I can fill it. I'm open if there are any other options that I'm not aware of. 68 Chev, I get what you are saying about about heating it to get up a low spot, but I'm not sure if it'll work in this sitch. If it were pushed in by impact, etc, I'd say yeah. I appreciate the input.

  5. #5
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    I get it, the bumper isn't damaged but is "indented" some in the center) so the long rectangular European license plates fit it.

    I say they are long but wider (going from left to right) is probaly more accurate.

    There are guys on the Audi Forums I hang out on that get those plates. I would say they are 4.5 in x 20.5 in.

    You might be able to get away with it, either using Evercoat (what Len sells) or whatever it is similar you've found.

    The key to working with fillers is to build up the layers and not try to lay it on too thick per application.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chanorama
    Thanks for the quick responses. I probably should mention that its an aftermarket bumper that came with a crappy runny primercoat that I don't trust. I'm going to take it to bare 'thane. In case this helps, Its made of PUR/RIM thermoset polyurethane. The recess is molded in for a europlate, which makes it look like garbage with or without a us tag. I'm hoping I can fill it. I'm open if there are any other options that I'm not aware of. 68 Chev, I get what you are saying about about heating it to get up a low spot, but I'm not sure if it'll work in this sitch. If it were pushed in by impact, etc, I'd say yeah. I appreciate the input.
    It might still work. Do you have or know someone who has a heat gun. If so I recamend you try it on an old trash bumper(from a body shop if you don't have one) I find that if you get them hot enough you can form them any way you want with two body dollys. One on each side. No I haven't tried what you are doing but when this stuff gets really hot it becomes flowable.

    Sorry if I am beating a dead horse JMO

    Raw plastic Bulldog, epoxy,filler,2k

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chanorama
    Thanks for the quick responses. I probably should mention that its an aftermarket bumper that came with a crappy runny primercoat that I don't trust. I'm going to take it to bare 'thane. In case this helps, Its made of PUR/RIM thermoset polyurethane. The recess is molded in for a europlate, which makes it look like garbage with or without a us tag. I'm hoping I can fill it. I'm open if there are any other options that I'm not aware of. 68 Chev, I get what you are saying about about heating it to get up a low spot, but I'm not sure if it'll work in this sitch. If it were pushed in by impact, etc, I'd say yeah. I appreciate the input.
    Sorry, I did a quick read on the job to be done and didn't get the picture. I would use a "plastic repair" material and not just filler because it's too much filling and a filler that thick could let go later. I'd give the surface a good scratch and fill it with something like Fusor 142 after using an adhesion promoter.

    The other products I mentioned would probably work ok but the chance of problems with the Poly-Flex is much greater when the area is that large and thick.


  8. #8
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    Len and all,

    First...great site!!!

    secondly, is Fusor 142 comparable to 3M bumper repair? If not what are your opinions on both products...unbiased of course

  9. #9
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    The reason I sell the Fusor is that it's real good stuff. I know guys that like the 3M material but I haven't found anything that beats Fusor.

  10. #10
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    May 2006
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    (Hi Len and all, it's Allan from Toronto, I ordered a neoterik and some spray guns last year from you which have worked out really well.)

    The topic of this thread is perfect for me, as I too have a urethane issue. In my case, I want to re-do a front spoiler in which the lower edge has some curb rash. The deepest gouge is probably 1/8". From what I can tell, the Fusor 142 looks the right type of product for this repair. My two questions before I chose it are:

    1) Does the Fusor bond directly to cleaned and sanded urethane with just the 602 surface modifier sprayed on?

    2) Can I prime directly on the sanded Fusor, or is there a special sealer? BTW I am planning to use Glasurit 285-60 primer with the appropriate flex additive.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by amjf088; 05-24-2006 at 10:29 AM.

  11. #11
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    Hi Allan
    The 142 is more for broken plastic and, since your plastic is scratched and not broken, I'd do one of two things.

    1. Scuff the area with some 80 grit, apply some adhesion promoter then apply some Evercoat Polyflex or....

    2. Use Fusor 114 because you don't need an adhesion promoter or an applicator gun like you do with the 142. The 114 bonds well with the surface, hardens quickly and can be used for a finishing filler or for structural repairs when used with the reinforcing mesh.


  12. #12
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    May 2006
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    Hi Len, that is nice and clear advice. It sounds like the 114 might be the right way to go for me then. After I have sanded it out, would I be able to prime directly over it with Glasurit 285-60 HS primer with the flex additive? Or, will I need a adhesion promoter?

    As this is a re-finish, I was intending to sand down to factory primer everywhere (P320), repair the few gouges and then start with the 285-60... does this sound on the right track?

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