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Thread: Electric dent pullers

  1. #1

    Question Electric dent pullers

    I got hit by a deer the other night. Pushed in a dish dent behind the cab at the front of the bed. It's a oil can dent. I'm on a fixed income, will a Harbor freight gun work do you think? I know you get what you pay for but price is an issue here. Any experience with these, any input would be appreciated. I tried heat and dry ice but there is a crease that runs the length of the box and the dent is real close to it.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Stuart,Florida
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    never used one form HF ,do they sell the pin style dent pullers
    where it welds a metal pin to the sheetmetal and then the puller attaches.
    it should work good enough to do that.
    another choice would be to got to a bodyshop and ask them to pull the dent
    for you with a stud gun and finish the rest yourself.
    unless you have use for a dent puller,but if not why spend money on something you may not use again or often for that matter.
    I'm sure they wouldn't charg much to just pull the dent out.
    -Jeff
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hexhead
    I got hit by a deer the other night. Pushed in a dish dent behind the cab at the front of the bed. It's a oil can dent. I'm on a fixed income, will a Harbor freight gun work do you think? I know you get what you pay for but price is an issue here. Any experience with these, any input would be appreciated. I tried heat and dry ice but there is a crease that runs the length of the box and the dent is real close to it.
    Thanks

    I'm not familiar with the HF tool. I sell them here starting at $169.95 at this time. If you need to shrink you can also get a shrink tip for $9.95 to help control the oil canning. The more expensive kits come with a variety of attachments including a shrink tip. Great tool for pulling out dents. There's a picture that pops up every once-in-a-while at the top of this forum that is a close up of the pull pins that are being used to pull a dent.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    I bought a harbor freight stud welder last winter. It's so piss poor that the name on the label is misspelled. The tip isn't designed very well so you have to be lined up almost perfect to get it to do its thing. The housing is low-quality plastic and mine came with cracks in it. Had I known I could have gotten one for less than $200, I would have skipped the HF gun.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
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    Hexhead, can you post a picture of the damage ? There may be more than one way to do that without a stud welder.

  6. #6
    88GT Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V
    Hexhead, can you post a picture of the damage ? There may be more than one way to do that without a stud welder.
    Agreed. You might be able to dolly it out if you can reach the back side from underneath the bedside

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    If the dent is gentle enough you might even be able to use a bathroom plunger to pull it out. However, I've been in this business for a long time and I don't think I've ever had a dent that the suction cup could pull out really well.

  8. #8

    Default

    I've pulled the crap out of it with my suction cup, but because of the ridge that runs down the bed it won't stay, also there is a piece of metal (in back of dent) that keeps me from getting behind it

    (2001 Nissan reg cab pick up) dent goes from about a foot from the cab to the rear wheel cladding.

    Thanks for the tip on HF tool. what are your thoughts of drilling it and pulling. I just worried I can't get behind it to do any dolling if I get it out to much.

    What does the shrinking tip look like on a dent puller (electric)?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Yep, it takes a perfect type of dent for a suction cup to work.

    Holes punched or drilled into the metal will work but they also allow moisture to get to the filler and cause the repair to fail while a stud welder doesn't penetrate the metal leaving the filler protected.

    The shrink tip (pictured below) replaces the stud tip on your stud welder. This allows you to tighten the metal without using a torch or water.


  10. #10

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    Well I got the Harbor freight stud gun. It was on sale for 99 and being on a fixed income I just can't buy what is the best. It's a different model than the older one they made model 3223, this one is a model 8878. Maybe it's better now?

    It came with three tips #2,3,4 and 100 studs of each. I'm assuming the heaver the metal the bigger the stud?

    My question is after I get it down to the metal how should the studs be placed. The dent is a bit smaller than a eating plate. Should I start from the out side and work in, or pull from the middle out.

    Ps if these studs pull loose and they be reapplied?

    Thanks

  11. Default

    A guy taught me a good tip... Pull the trigger long enough to give you that pull you need cause when you're done with it you can take pliers, twist them off, and use them again. It only works on very easy dents though or the last few studs pulled. For you however, may not be able to do that with HF. You should have stayed away from that brand cause it may not be good for thinner high strength steels. It'll burn thru it easily so you gotta be careful when holding down the trigger. The better stud guns don't run so hot to get a good hold, and for hard dents you'll need that grip. Just be light on the trigger.

  12. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hexhead
    Well I got the Harbor freight stud gun. It was on sale for 99 and being on a fixed income I just can't buy what is the best. It's a different model than the older one they made model 3223, this one is a model 8878. Maybe it's better now?

    It came with three tips #2,3,4 and 100 studs of each. I'm assuming the heaver the metal the bigger the stud?

    My question is after I get it down to the metal how should the studs be placed. The dent is a bit smaller than a eating plate. Should I start from the out side and work in, or pull from the middle out.

    Ps if these studs pull loose and they be reapplied?

    Thanks

    Your copper tips are so you can bend them. Black tips are supposed to adhere better or have better corrosion protection. One of the two. To lazy to check.

    If it's a dent you can imagine you could push out with your hand with ease than just use one in the lowest spot. Use the slide hammer lightly. If it's something with a crease and a high spot. Weld one right on the top of the crease and pull stud while tapping down your high spots (ridges left from dent). Than do the bottom of the crease and weld stud. Pull stud while tapping down highs. Than, just keep going back and forth from the top of the crease to the bottom till you work out the center, and at that point the dent won't even be as big cause you released its stresses correctly. All hammer blows should be squared, light, and overlap the last tap.

  13. #13

    Default

    Thanks "Showcar" I can get my head around that. The HF seems to be doing a good job of sticking the pins, I haven't had one come off yet (but I know I will).

    What is a good brand of hammers?

  14. Default

    I actually did a lot of research on this and found that the set that Len sells on the site is the best deal out there. Some of the other choices from around the web had hammer heads that were too thick, or the dollys were tiny and had to many sharp edges. The set Len sells has the dollys I'm looking for and the hammers have thin but big heads for great control. My only complaint is that I think the pic should be a little sharper but it's by far the best deal I've seen, and I could always sharpen the pic.

  15. Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Hexhead
    Thanks "Showcar" I can get my head around that. The HF seems to be doing a good job of sticking the pins, I haven't had one come off yet (but I know I will).

    What is a good brand of hammers?
    Well the problem isn't getting them to stick, it's getting them not burn thru while providing a GOOD stick on the harder to pull dents. That's where you can run into problems. However, there's a limit for any stud gun, and they generally don't help much on work hardened stubborn dents.

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