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Thread: DP90LF Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5

    Default DP90LF Question

    After spraying dp90lf epoxy primer, do you have to apply a 2k primer within the topcoat window(60 min), or can you scuff up the dp90 and apply the 2k in a few days? I'm assumming the recoat window (7 days)is only for more dp90, not a 2k primer? Confused...:confused: Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    592

    Default

    you can let it sit for as long as you like. Just make sure you sand it before applying your 2k if you miss recoat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3

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    I put my 2k on within the 7 day period without sanding, does this mean I made a mistake:eek:

  4. #4

    Default

    That topcoat time is not a window it is the minimun time you must wait before you can top coat. This is very important for DPLF. If you topcoat to soon it will delaminate. The 7 days applies to 2K as well but don't push that either because these times are specified for 70 degree panel temp. The times can vary quite a bit if it is hotter or colder.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    27,097

    Default

    The recoat time window is the time that it takes for the coating to harden enough that it must be sanded before recoating. If the recoat window is 6 hours then it must be recoated BEFORE 6 hours has elapsed or you must sand first then either re-prime or paint.

    When some primers go beyond the recoat window it's recommened that they be sanded and re-primed while others can be sanded and painted.

    If the recoat window was 7 days and you HAD TO WAIT that time before recoating no body shop would ever use that product.

  6. #6

    Default

    There is a "topcoat" time which is a minimum and there is a "recoat" time that is a maximum. Between those is the window. Sorry if my previous post was confusing. Waiting 7 days would really slow things down:rolleyes:

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    24

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    I just did a complete in DPLF. 2 full wet coats, and what I did was wait about a week and a half, the weather has been about 70 degrees or so then sanded w/ 320 wet and a small block. The car was pretty straight so no blow throughs. a little extra work but it sure gave me a nice stable surface to apply my primer surfacer. I'm not a pro but this seems to be working for me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    80

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    An easy way to tell if you can recoat without sanding is to do a solvent test. Take a bit of the same reducer you used when you sprayed, put it on a rag and wipe the surface in an inconspicous area. It it softens right up and your rag takes the primer off then you can recoat without sanding. If it doesn't and you have to scrub at it to wipe a bit off, then its time to sand..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    205

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    Sorry Dork. That's poor advice. 2K urethanes & epoxy's are totally different. A good epoxy can be cured & ready for topcoat & still not leave residue during a solvent wipe. In fact, good epoxys accept topcoats better after 3-7 days, much after they stop softening during a solvent wipe. Also, a good 2K primer will not soften while it's still recoatable. Read your tech sheet for product specs.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dork
    An easy way to tell if you can recoat without sanding is to do a solvent test. Take a bit of the same reducer you used when you sprayed, put it on a rag and wipe the surface in an inconspicous area. It it softens right up and your rag takes the primer off then you can recoat without sanding. If it doesn't and you have to scrub at it to wipe a bit off, then its time to sand..
    You may have had luck with this technique but I would recommend following the product data sheet to determine if you are in the recoat window. I would have no confidence in the solvent test.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ZcarDen
    I just did a complete in DPLF. 2 full wet coats, and what I did was wait about a week and a half, the weather has been about 70 degrees or so then sanded w/ 320 wet and a small block. The car was pretty straight so no blow throughs. a little extra work but it sure gave me a nice stable surface to apply my primer surfacer. I'm not a pro but this seems to be working for me.
    2k should really be sprayed "wet on wet" within the recoat window. It will save you the extra work you mentioned and will provide better adhesion. All the work you did blocking is wasted if you cover it with primmer surfacer. If the car is straight with the DPLF you could go straight to base and clear and not use 2K at all.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cjohnson
    You may have had luck with this technique but I would recommend following the product data sheet to determine if you are in the recoat window. I would have no confidence in the solvent test.
    Sorry. not trying to give out any bad advice. Just somthing I was told at a PPG training center years ago and seems to work. I was in fact told not to rely on the P sheet and do a solvent wipe to be sure..
    Last edited by Dork; 07-06-2007 at 08:54 PM.

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