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Thread: Painting the car with doors, fenders removed

  1. #31
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    Default Also...

    Quote Originally Posted by JMTC View Post
    I paint in a similar environment, thus the reason I paint in pieces. My shop can't remove the over spray fast enough to do a complete car. No idea what you have to remove over spray. I prep and paint tub first, let cure, cover, then do front fenders, and hood. then I assemble fenders and hood. then do the doors and assemble. This way there aren't panels laying around getting scratched. That being said, putting up fresh plastic around shop each time is impractical.
    I have to mention, If you are just learning to try and do a professional paint job, doing the tub first has disadvantages, main one being, if you make a mistake you will likely have to spray the entire tub over to get a seamless repair. If you can do fenders first and you have a safe place to store them, then you get practice and confidence, also see how much dirt gets into paint job and make adjustments.
    Hope that helps a bit.
    OVERSPRY: has lots of variables.

    My go to gun is the Devilbiss TEKNA (bought here new!) I recall the first time I used it (on a neighbors deck lid) I had quite a bit more OVERSPRAY than I would have thought.

    I'm thankful for this site because others with the same gun spoke about air pressure to the gun and I was up too high. Anyway, brought that down and overspray was cut WAY down with only a 5 lb drop in pressure.

    Not sure of the gun you're using and so on but many things do matter. Keep us posted.

    Henry

  2. #32
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    Dec 2005
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    I have been block sanding with 400g I have 220g but I have no way to attach it to the block, my question is the primer seems to have been put on a bit lite as you can see the white seal coat also the marks on the fender almost look like a skil saw blade was rolled over it as the marks are a bit deep and square, Can I go over this with glazing putty than sand and re primer?

    DSCF2006.jpgDSCF2001.jpg
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  3. #33
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    The problem with putty is that it's almost impossible to apply it to a large are evenly. I'd recommend spraying on a filler primer like Slick Sand or some other heavier primer then guide coat again and wet sand.

  4. #34
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    Do I have to scratch the surface or just put it on

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Do I have to scratch the surface or just put it on
    If its been sanded with 400 or more coarse you should be ok just to shoot it.

  6. #36
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    do yourself a big favor and use the 220 grit figured out. it'll cut so much better. you're trying to get a round fender flat. it's a crazy concept isn't it? choosing the right flexibility of the block and the right blocking pattern make a huge difference. plus, if your paper is too fine you won't cut the tops off of the surface as good as coarser paper will. try not to run your block straight up and down, or straight right to left, always try to go with a diagonal across the radius of the fender. for instance, hold the long block horizontally, and sand up and to the left, an down to the right. then switch to the opposite pattern. it makes an x pattern. work your way down the fender like that. use smaller blocks in the tighter areas but try to follow the same technique.
    the panels on old european cars may have had different manufacturing techniques, depending on what company provided them. so you can run into weird looking marks in the metal here and there, especially on the radius areas, or where they did some welding. they used very fast cutting or grinding tools and that left a few surface defects, then smoothed it all over with either lead or putty.
    if the surface defects are too much for regular high build primer you could shoot slick sand like len said. or the optex might be a good choice too. to me, it looks like you can shoot another couple of heavy coats of high build and knock most of it down.
    b marler

  7. #37
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    Mr. Marler,
    as you probably know I am on a very tight budget very tight and the way it is turning out I would say good enough and squirt the color on it my problem is my nitty picky son, he thinks we are putting together a show car and it must be perfect I am trying to get him to shake the idea, I am just looking at a car that my daddy bought many moons ago and I want it to look nice but not show quality, I want to park it at Wally world, and if it gets dinged so be it. I have ordered some Dura Blocks and a small container of Evercoat glaze putty to fill in the scratches any minor dings I will let be.
    As for the choice of sandpaper, I have a huge roll of 400g sticky back and I have all the time in the world besides it is winter here. I have an older son who through some connection acquired a whole trunkload of 3M hookit disks from 600g up to 2000g.
    I do appreciate your help and all of the others on the forum for their knowledge.
    JimG

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Mr. Marler,
    as you probably know I am on a very tight budget very tight and the way it is turning out I would say good enough and squirt the color on it my problem is my nitty picky son, he thinks we are putting together a show car and it must be perfect I am trying to get him to shake the idea, I am just looking at a car that my daddy bought many moons ago and I want it to look nice but not show quality, I want to park it at Wally world, and if it gets dinged so be it. I have ordered some Dura Blocks and a small container of Evercoat glaze putty to fill in the scratches any minor dings I will let be.
    As for the choice of sandpaper, I have a huge roll of 400g sticky back and I have all the time in the world besides it is winter here. I have an older son who through some connection acquired a whole trunkload of 3M hookit disks from 600g up to 2000g.
    I do appreciate your help and all of the others on the forum for their knowledge.
    JimG
    i get where you're going. i kind of thought you had stepped it up a bit since you pulled it all apart. be sure to prime over where you use the glazing putty to seal it up before painting.
    b marler

  9. #39
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    I have the fenders sanded and a couple of doors and I have one front door (driver) that has a fairly deep dent that will show can I fill over the primer or do I take it to metal?
    I thought I had purchased a high-build primer but I am wondering! Can I mix the primer with less hardener currently (4:1) or do I just lay it on heavy over the grind marks on the fender also do I have too remove all the guide coat if I miss a minor spot will it affect the paint.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    I have the fenders sanded and a couple of doors and I have one front door (driver) that has a fairly deep dent that will show can I fill over the primer or do I take it to metal?
    I thought I had purchased a high-build primer but I am wondering! Can I mix the primer with less hardener currently (4:1) or do I just lay it on heavy over the grind marks on the fender also do I have too remove all the guide coat if I miss a minor spot will it affect the paint.
    i think you have epoxy on everything right? i'd scuff off the primer and apply the filler over the epoxy. scuff with 80 grit and press the filler in firmly so it fills the scratch marks.
    and don't worry about a small amount of guide coat, it won't matter.
    b marler

  11. #41
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    I know I should not ask this, could I use a lacquer Primer over the urethane primer?

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    I know I should not ask this, could I use a lacquer Primer over the urethane primer?
    Sure it can be used BUT there are reasons that it no longer is used by people that want the best results. My biggest complaint about lacquer primer is that it tends to absorb solvent from the top coats then shrink as the finish ages showing underlying scratches etc.

  13. #43
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    Default Glazing Putty

    Glazing putty is finer and runnier than body filler, If you get a new plastic applicator with no nicks, mix up a small portion (half golf ball), spread it on the low spots then go back over pressing hard and scrape almost all it off, the putty that you collect on applicator, spread on another area ahead or beside and do the same thing over and over. (this is the same technique as finish coat/screws on drywall you only want mud in the holes) If you get all the putty that you mixed applied before it starts to harden you can try mixing more per batch, or as you get better. Also as the fender you just worked on is hardening you can work on another, or let your thumb rest. Lol
    At the stage you are at perfection is where I would be aiming. If i didn't care how it turns out I would have bypassed the guide coat.

  14. #44
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    Default Question?

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    I know I should not ask this, could I use a lacquer Primer over the urethane primer?
    Would that be mixed autobody lacquer primer or buzz bomb?

    Len is correct and lacquer is last weeks lunch but "CAN" work but nothing spray can which ALL of DUPLICOLOR is.

    Henry

    (USE CAUTION as you're building the FOUNDATION THAT THE REST OF THE HOUSE WILL "RELY" ON!)

  15. #45
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    Aw, it was a dumb question that should not have been asked, I now have the doors & fenders sanded using a guide coat and 400g paper, Monday I am going to tackle the hood and the body. I must admit the GC made me quite picky trying to find every black spot and eliminate them and to think I will have to do it all over by the weekend.
    I do have a question about painting the little stuff like door hinges and hood hinges any trick to spraying.
    Have a great week
    JG

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