TheCoatingStore.com

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 74

Thread: Painting the car with doors, fenders removed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

    Default Painting the car with doors, fenders removed

    A question I have the doors, fenders, hood, and trunk lid removed can I prime these parts separately or would I be better off assembling the car and then applying theprimer? I know buy painting each part there is a chance of damaging the paint while assembling. The same goes for the color which is a single-stage urethane.
    Last edited by wisconsinjimmy; 11-18-2021 at 03:48 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,806

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    A question I have the doors, fenders, hood, and trunk lid removed can I prime these parts separately or would I be better off assembling the car and then applying theprimer? I know buy painting each part there is a chance of damaging the paint while assembling. The same goes for the color which is a single-stage urethane.
    As long as you can assemble the car carefully while it's in primer you should be fine. However if you paint the car using a metallic color it may not match the adjacent panels. Everything effects the match of metallic paint, temperature, application technique, air pressure, gun type, etc. etc. That's why it's best to shoot the car after assembly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

    Default

    Hi Len,
    The color is non-metallic blue, I would just as soon paint the body parts off the car so that I can keep them flat in hopes of fewer runs, and being the novice it is going to happen, I wish there was a magic paint that you pour unto the surface and presto it is perfect, so much for the wish.
    One other thing I am not going to have enough epoxy (white) to finish the car and I do have a quart of PPG Omni (grey). I do not intend to mix the product just spray the white until I run out and then switch over to the grey? I would stop on the last panel that I could spray completely and then switch. The whole car is getting a high build primer after which I will seal and then the color.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,806

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Hi Len,
    The color is non-metallic blue, I would just as soon paint the body parts off the car so that I can keep them flat in hopes of fewer runs, and being the novice it is going to happen, I wish there was a magic paint that you pour unto the surface and presto it is perfect, so much for the wish.
    One other thing I am not going to have enough epoxy (white) to finish the car and I do have a quart of PPG Omni (grey). I do not intend to mix the product just spray the white until I run out and then switch over to the grey? I would stop on the last panel that I could spray completely and then switch. The whole car is getting a high build primer after which I will seal and then the color.
    As long as your top coat blue is a decent quality product you shouldn't have a problem using different color primers but be sure to put enough top coat on it to hide any primer variations.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

    Default

    This is the link to the paint I have chosen
    https://tcpglobal.com/collections/ac...nt-Reflex-Blue
    I do not know why I chose white primer instead of grey and now that I am thinking about it the high build 2K is grey, I know I was thinking about yellow so is the ways of the amatuer thank you

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    1,829

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    This is the link to the paint I have chosen
    https://tcpglobal.com/collections/ac...nt-Reflex-Blue
    I do not know why I chose white primer instead of grey and now that I am thinking about it the high build 2K is grey, I know I was thinking about yellow so is the ways of the amatuer thank you
    if i understand correctly, your epoxy is different color, but you're putting 2k urethane primer over the top of it. there's absolutely no reason you can't do this. the urethane will bring everything into the same shade before the topcoat is applied.
    if you were using different colors of high build then you would possibly have an issue.
    b marler

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    1,829

    Default

    in addition, i paint things in pieces when it makes sense to do so. on a solid color it is not really a problem, metallic is a whole 'nother story. i use clear wrap (track tape) for assembly so i don't chip the edges up when mounting doors, fenders, etc...
    b marler

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    31,486

    Default

    A little tid bit of helpful information. Before you do any priming assemble the car to make sure everything fits correctly. All body lines line up etc. This is a critical must do step. When you get everything lined up and fitting correctly open the doors and drill an 1/8" hole through the hinge into the hinge pillar of the car. That way when you take the body parts off the car and prime and paint them you next step would be reassembly. Those 1/8" holes when line up with an ice pick looking tool will assure that the doors are properly aligned. I have a couple tools by snap on and mac that resemble an ice pick. I have another tool by snap on that is sold as a tool for removing radiation hoses that are stuck to the radiator outlet etc only this tool is like an ice pick but with 45 deg. bend a couple inches from the sharp end. Those tools are great for reassembling body parts (using the 1/8" holes you drilled before disassembly.) You can do that on all the bolt on body panels. When you're all done with reassenbly you fill the 1/8" holes with whatever you want, then brush touch the filled hole with the same paint you painted the car with.

    After painting leading up to reassembly tape all exposed edges with 2" masking tape. At least two layers of tape to keep from boogering up the paint on reassembly.
    LS says "Lets Go Brandon". He's like that.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

    Default

    Thank you MR. Phil,
    I was looking at the fenders and doors I have stripped of paint and the hinges, and have used 80g on all bare metal. my biggest problem is getting out the hinge pins as I cannot totally remove them from the door. Hinges are riveted to the door first and then the window channel is welded in and the rivets look like a plug about 3/8" in diam and cut or ground flat with the metal. where the hinge fits into the body there is no adjusting as the nuts are pressed into the body and the screws which are slothead barely fit into the hinge holes.
    All of the body parts have welting to keep the squeaking to a minimum
    The doors are a pain as I am doing my best to remove the paint on the jams? and on and around the pinch weld, I went to bare metal on the very edge of the door interior as I know the upholstery panel does not hide that very edge.
    Is there a trick to removing the paint on the inside of the hood or just scratch it up really well?
    And the drill hole is a great idea and I will be able to use it on the fender edge, I will instal the fender get it adjusted and drill the locating holes. before painting.
    Have a great Tday

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    31,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Thank you MR. Phil,
    I was looking at the fenders and doors I have stripped of paint and the hinges, and have used 80g on all bare metal. my biggest problem is getting out the hinge pins as I cannot totally remove them from the door. Hinges are riveted to the door first and then the window channel is welded in and the rivets look like a plug about 3/8" in diam and cut or ground flat with the metal. where the hinge fits into the body there is no adjusting as the nuts are pressed into the body and the screws which are slothead barely fit into the hinge holes.
    All of the body parts have welting to keep the squeaking to a minimum
    The doors are a pain as I am doing my best to remove the paint on the jams? and on and around the pinch weld, I went to bare metal on the very edge of the door interior as I know the upholstery panel does not hide that very edge.
    Is there a trick to removing the paint on the inside of the hood or just scratch it up really well?
    And the drill hole is a great idea and I will be able to use it on the fender edge, I will instal the fender get it adjusted and drill the locating holes. before painting.
    Have a great Tday
    What make, model and year of car are we talking about here ?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    31,486

    Default

    I never heard of a Ford Prefect. That car looks more like from the 1930's than 1950.

    I have to admit that car is before my time of and area of expertise. I'm afraid I won't be much help to you on this one with the bodywork.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,806

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Thank you MR. Phil,
    I was looking at the fenders and doors I have stripped of paint and the hinges, and have used 80g on all bare metal. my biggest problem is getting out the hinge pins as I cannot totally remove them from the door. Hinges are riveted to the door first and then the window channel is welded in and the rivets look like a plug about 3/8" in diam and cut or ground flat with the metal. where the hinge fits into the body there is no adjusting as the nuts are pressed into the body and the screws which are slothead barely fit into the hinge holes.
    All of the body parts have welting to keep the squeaking to a minimum
    The doors are a pain as I am doing my best to remove the paint on the jams? and on and around the pinch weld, I went to bare metal on the very edge of the door interior as I know the upholstery panel does not hide that very edge.
    Is there a trick to removing the paint on the inside of the hood or just scratch it up really well?
    And the drill hole is a great idea and I will be able to use it on the fender edge, I will instal the fender get it adjusted and drill the locating holes. before painting.
    Have a great Tday
    We use several methods for removing paint. For most of the exterior we just use 80 grit disks on a variable speed buffer but on areas that are hard to get to we either use chemical stripper or a spot blaster.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    543

    Default

    Hello Len,
    On the exterior of the hood I used the Aircraft Stripper (bad-smelling stuff) and laid it on heavy before I quit for the night which worked quite well, I am using a 4-1/3" angle grinder with a surface stripper disk and once I am to shiny metal I use the DA with 80g before the epoxy. For the interior of the hood, I am going to use a stripper and follow up with the angle grinder and then the DA. once I am done with the hood it will be lots of priming also I have gone past the window for the epoxy on the body what grit should I use? and do I use a 600g between the primer and the finish?

    Phil V. I know you have heard of the Ford Anglia of Gasser Fame, this is its big brother with four doors and a bit more luxurious, the engine is 1.2L somewhere between 10 and 30 horsepower depending if it is Britain or Australia.
    d0d1d624a55e20f2b8a210d31367d24f.jpg

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    31,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Hello Len,
    On the exterior of the hood I used the Aircraft Stripper (bad-smelling stuff) and laid it on heavy before I quit for the night which worked quite well, I am using a 4-1/3" angle grinder with a surface stripper disk and once I am to shiny metal I use the DA with 80g before the epoxy. For the interior of the hood, I am going to use a stripper and follow up with the angle grinder and then the DA. once I am done with the hood it will be lots of priming also I have gone past the window for the epoxy on the body what grit should I use? and do I use a 600g between the primer and the finish?

    Phil V. I know you have heard of the Ford Anglia of Gasser Fame, this is its big brother with four doors and a bit more luxurious, the engine is 1.2L somewhere between 10 and 30 horsepower depending if it is Britain or Australia.
    d0d1d624a55e20f2b8a210d31367d24f.jpg
    Thanks for the reply. Ya, I definitely heard of the Anglia most from drag racing fame. 10 to 30 hp, a real torque monster there, LOL.

    When I was a kid my dad had a Renault Dauphine from around 1960. We went everywhere in that thing. The only time it ever got stuck was when the rear wheels were high and dry.(no traction). It had a blazing 27 hp water cooled rear engine. I remember it had a lever on the steering column where you could switch from town or country horn. Don't think that ever caught on. I would buy a nice rust free restorable Dauphine if could find one. I bought one about 12 years ago but it was much rougher than I had anticipated. Mice had been living in the car for years and it reeked of mouse piss and mice droppings. The smell sank right into the metal. I ended up selling it to a Polish immigrant in Detroit. He emailed a while later and said he loved that car.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •