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Thread: Painting the car with doors, fenders removed

  1. #16
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    Dec 2005
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    Yes this car was full of rat feces and it stunk bad so I took the steamer to it and steam cleaned every inch and then I let it sit outside for about a week ripped the headliner out and the back seat front was ok and I also used rattle can on the metal in the rear and above the windshield and that removed the stink. The engine is or was babited now it has new rods that take an insert. I always remembered riding in that little thing and after dad passed it was handed to me and that is where my mistake began as all the parts have to come from Britain and the exchange rate is a killer along with the shipping, to date I have everything I need to finish the car, the engine is rebuilt and all I need to do is paint and sew a new interior. The total value of a mint car is $8000. and I have $5000. in parts and shipping just a memory thing.
    Take care

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Yes this car was full of rat feces and it stunk bad so I took the steamer to it and steam cleaned every inch and then I let it sit outside for about a week ripped the headliner out and the back seat front was ok and I also used rattle can on the metal in the rear and above the windshield and that removed the stink. The engine is or was babited now it has new rods that take an insert. I always remembered riding in that little thing and after dad passed it was handed to me and that is where my mistake began as all the parts have to come from Britain and the exchange rate is a killer along with the shipping, to date I have everything I need to finish the car, the engine is rebuilt and all I need to do is paint and sew a new interior. The total value of a mint car is $8000. and I have $5000. in parts and shipping just a memory thing.
    Take care
    i know all about getting parts from "across the pond" as they say. i have a couple of 60" vintage lancia cars. both are coachbuilt, body panels have to be made from scratch typically. trim pieces? forget it. i'm always on the hunt for good pieces of this or that, now and then something turns up in the weirdest places. a lot of the parts used in these were shared by ferarri or other high end brands. sometimes, if you're lucky, fiat. fiat prices are usually lower, but not by much. usually, prices are through the roof. add in shipping and wipe the tears from your eyes. we don't do it for the monetary gain, we do it for sentiment.
    b marler

  3. #18
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    Dec 2005
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    Update on the Prefect, finished the epoxy to bare metal on Sunday, today is high build primer day.
    Hope all had a great Thanksgiving20211128_180546.jpgDSCF0495.jpg

  4. #19
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    Are you spraying all those part entirely with high build? That's a lot of block sanding.

  5. #20
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    Dec 2005
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    Gray DTM High Build 2K Primer Surfacer (Direct to Metal) 2.1 VOC, 1-1/4 Gallon Kit - Fast Dry High-Performance Primer - Automotive and Industrial Use.
    I thought that is what I was supposed to use to remove any scratches and imperfections in the tired steel, are you saying I should have gone in a different direction?
    It does not say on the can if it is a high build and I have purchased the paint and cannot return the paint so may as well get ready for the block sanding one thing in my favor is that winters are long plenty of time to sand it down.
    If it was possible to put the color over the epoxy I might have done that but the epoxy feels a titch rough wonder if I should run a red scratch pad over it?

  6. #21
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    i think the 2k primer over the epoxy was a good idea. like you say, you've got all winter to block it out. i'd have done the same thing. i find blocking to be quite relaxing, clears my mind from all the distractions of everyday life. that car is going to have quite a few battle scars from its decades of use, the blocking will smooth that all away. it allows you to finesse every square inch of the surface.
    b marler

  7. #22
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    Gray DTM High Build 2K Primer Surfacer (Direct to Metal) 2.1 VOC, 1-1/4 Gallon Kit - Fast Dry High-Performance Primer - Automotive and Industrial Use.
    I thought that is what I was supposed to use to remove any scratches and imperfections in the tired steel, are you saying I should have gone in a different direction?
    It does not say on the can if it is a high build and I have purchased the paint and cannot return the paint so may as well get ready for the block sanding one thing in my favor is that winters are long plenty of time to sand it down.
    If it was possible to put the color over the epoxy I might have done that but the epoxy feels a titch rough wonder if I should run a red scratch pad over it?
    2K primer is usually applied to help level any variables and fill scratches, it's fine to cover the entire surface with it but it's not usually necessary. Be sure to spray a guide coat lightly over the 2K prior to sanding.

  8. #23
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    Dec 2005
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    Hello
    I have the car in the grey hi-build primer at least I think it is a high build, I have included photos of the job the paint directions say to wait 8 hours to sand and I am going to give it a couple of days as the shop cools down at night. I do have a question on spraying the 2K on the body and parts, my son did the spraying and I did the measuring and mixing and it seems the paint went on a bit dry as it did not have the wet look for very long overlap of about 50% the gun had a 1.8 tip and he had the fluid pretty well open with 22psi and all of the parts you see took a bit more than a half-gallon.
    20211130_154338.jpg20211130_154649.jpg
    If we did it correct what grit do we use to block sand.
    Last edited by wisconsinjimmy; 12-01-2021 at 07:03 AM.

  9. #24
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    What type of paint will you be using? Single stage or base clear and what color?

  10. #25
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    Jan 2019
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    Ontario Canada
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    Default Been following

    Non metallic blue single stage urethane.
    At the stage your at, I would (on my projects) mist on black guide coat and block with 240, fill low spots with spot putty, make sure everything is perfectly strait. Then apply another coat of high build over reduced a bit. Then mist guide coat and finish sand with 600 grit.
    Because you are using single stage, single stage covers better than bc-cc you can finish sand with 400 grit (i think). if you start the blocking with 400 instead of 240 the process takes longer but will only have to be done once

  11. #26
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    agree with jmtc, except i use 220 for the first pass after guide coat. i like to wait a week for everything to tighten up but it's probably not necessary to wait that long. don't worry about the fact that the primer didn't remain glossy for very long. it's the nature of primer to flash and lose it's gloss very quickly.
    in this stage, i'd guide coat, 220 block, glazing putty in the small imperfections, spot prime the putty spots and burn throughs, guide coat those spots and then block everything with 400. then i like to use a dedicated 2k urethane sealer before paint.
    i usually run the fluid and fan wide open on the gun, and the pressure up around 30 psi, but you have to see what works best with the gun you have.
    if you ask 20 people what the next steps are you'll get 20 different answers. in other words, there isn't really a firm process. do what works for you, just following our general advice.
    b marler

  12. #27
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    OK I am sort of on the right track I thank all of you, yes I purchased a rattle can of SEM Guide Coat on Tuesday in anticipation of block sanding and I will hold off on sanding for a while as suggested that will give me time to clean the dust out of the shop. When we spray the color we are going to wrap the interior of the shop with plastic to keep the dust out of the spray area and wet the floor. Any suggestions on the wrapping?
    Jim

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    OK I am sort of on the right track I thank all of you, yes I purchased a rattle can of SEM Guide Coat on Tuesday in anticipation of block sanding and I will hold off on sanding for a while as suggested that will give me time to clean the dust out of the shop. When we spray the color we are going to wrap the interior of the shop with plastic to keep the dust out of the spray area and wet the floor. Any suggestions on the wrapping?
    Jim
    i like the autobody specific masking plastic. it has a matte side that doesn't let the paint flake off if you blow some air at it. it's pretty thin though. i don't know if you could build an enclosure out of it.
    b marler

  14. #29
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    Jan 2019
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    Ontario Canada
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    91

    Default over spray

    I paint in a similar environment, thus the reason I paint in pieces. My shop can't remove the over spray fast enough to do a complete car. No idea what you have to remove over spray. I prep and paint tub first, let cure, cover, then do front fenders, and hood. then I assemble fenders and hood. then do the doors and assemble. This way there aren't panels laying around getting scratched. That being said, putting up fresh plastic around shop each time is impractical.
    I have to mention, If you are just learning to try and do a professional paint job, doing the tub first has disadvantages, main one being, if you make a mistake you will likely have to spray the entire tub over to get a seamless repair. If you can do fenders first and you have a safe place to store them, then you get practice and confidence, also see how much dirt gets into paint job and make adjustments.
    Hope that helps a bit.

  15. #30
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    Nov 2006
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    I have a furnace fan that I installed in a wood frame box made of 2x4’s. The frame is built to accept 3 furnace filters. One each on the left and right side and one on the back. The top and bottom are covered with plywood and the front is plywood with a hole sized to let the discharge end of the fan stick out. I bought a 1/8 inch thick sheet of plywood and cut it so that I can push it into the walk-in door opening when I have the door open. The door plug has a hole in the bottom that the furnace fan discharge fits into by pushing the plywood fan box up against the door plug. This fan box is very near where I paint. I build a wall using a tarp or 6 mil poly sheeting around whatever I paint. I keep it far enough away that I don’t bump into it as I move around because I’ll dislodge dust. Sometimes the area is big enough for a car and sometimes it’s just big enough for the parts I’m painting. The wall is constructed with a number of telescoping rods that are designed for dust control walls in the construction industry. I have 9 of them but most of the time use only 3 to 5 depending on the size of the room I’m building. One end of the tarp is against the north wall of my garage, The walk-in door is also on the north end. I start the wall going south and put a 90 degree corner after I pass my project going east toward my 16 foot garage door. I stop the wall about 3 foot short of the garage door to leave me a walk way back into the rest of the garage where I do my mixing and wait while paint flashes. I don’t try to seal the tarp to ceiling very well as I want air coming into the paint area and I want enough open area that the air velocity isn’t high enough to pick up dust. The fan gets rid of overspray quickly as it moves a lot of air. The overspray never gets into the rest of the garage because all the air is moving toward the fan. It may sound complicated but it only takes me a few minutes to set up and I don’t have to move anything out of the garage to keep it clean. The fan actually blows toward one of my cars that’s parked in front of the door. The filters pick up all the overspray and I’ve never had any on the parked car. When I’m not painting the fan box is used as a storage shelf.

    Bob K

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