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Thread: Bare Metal

  1. #1
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    Default Bare Metal

    I have the body down to bare shiny metal I have some small dents that should be filled can I fill the dents now and then spray epoxy or can I put the filler over the epoxy? One other item is can I use a paint stripper on the rest of the parts as there is so much paint it takes a lot of paper to remove,

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisconsinjimmy View Post
    I have the body down to bare shiny metal I have some small dents that should be filled can I fill the dents now and then spray epoxy or can I put the filler over the epoxy? One other item is can I use a paint stripper on the rest of the parts as there is so much paint it takes a lot of paper to remove,
    It's a judgment call on both questions. Most well experienced bodymen prefer to apply filler over bare metal. Some prefer filler over epoxy within a certain time window. (otherwise it has to be sanded with nothing finer than 180 grit paper). Like I said, it's up to you to decide which way you want to go. Both ways are considered a good choice.

    Paint stipper is messy with toxic vapors. But it does get the job done. I seriously avoid paint stripper for those very reasons. First of all its an out door in the fresh air job. An alternative to stripping smaller parts with paint stripper or sandpaper is media blasting. (my personal favorite)
    LS says "Lets Go Brandon". He's like that.

  3. #3
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    Phil,
    Thank you for your opinion, the reason for a stripper is the four coats of paint, Primer-Factory-light green to dark green and the primer is thick as well as the add-on color, the nooks, and crannies the Dremel does a decent job so no stripper on the body, I will use it on the fenders doors and hood as they are removed and I can do it outside. I think I will feel better laying putty on the bare metal as you said my choice. Sure has my shop a dusty mess am going to use the leaf blower to clean it out.

  4. #4
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    as usual, phil gives good advice. i would only add, just to be mindful of how long you leave your parts in bare metal. you'll have to decide how long you can leave it uncovered, based on temp, humidity. if i have a lot to do, i'll just epoxy coat to gain me the time i need to do the work. i like to use 80 grit for scratch on bare metal, (epoxy too if i'm using filler directly over it) be sure to press firmly with the first pass of filler so it fills the scratch marks fully.
    b marler

  5. #5
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    Here is what a naked Prefect looks like! The firewall I am unsure, think I will just scuff it good right now we are trying to get the paint removed from the area under the drip rail and other really tight 90 degree areas, the door I am waiting on some hardened pins. The screws that hold the rear door to the B-pillar will not come loose so I must use a pin removal tool and so far all I have managed to do is bend the tool pins and mess up the bottom hinge, I have had fire on it but that does not help. DSCF0486.jpgDSCF0481.jpg DSCF0482.jpg DSCF0483.jpg DSCF0484.jpg

  6. #6
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    very good progress i see. you're really doing good work there.
    i've had welded door hinges give me trouble now and then, i found that an air chisel with a pointed bit can break them loose. you can reshape the tip with a grinder so it more closely matches the size of the hinge pin and doesn't just mushroom the top of the pin when you drive it out.
    use a bit like the one shown here:https://www.amazon.com/Ingersoll-Ran...g=scoutedv2-20
    b marler

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    very good progress i see. you're really doing good work there.
    I've had welded door hinges give me trouble now and then, I found that an air chisel with a pointed bit can break them loose. you can reshape the tip with a grinder so it more closely matches the size of the hinge pin and doesn't just mushroom the top of the pin when you drive it out.
    use a bit like the one shown here:]
    Tried the air chisel route and other than vibrating the teeth still cannot turn the screws holding the hinge to the B-Pillar, front doors had like a stove bolt screw with nuts and they came loose where the back doors I cannot get to the door screw threads. It all boiled down to drilling out the hinge pins and that was not an easy job but the door is off and it appears we did not hurt the hinge pin hole. Today is clean up all the old paint residue or staining and work at getting the paint out of the tight body bends, I have found that the Dremel does OK but it is slow. I was hoping to get the body in epoxy today but again it is looking more like Thursday, the car has been in various states of bare metal since last week and I am getting nervous.
    Thank you for the compliment.

  8. #8
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    Had this problem more than once on these older cars. I remove the the hinges completely from both the pillar and door. Span the hinge in a vise where you can drive the pin straight down using a good size hammer. Prior to driving pins I soak entire hinge overnight drenched in a cloth covered rag in Master Blaster, don a pair of welding gloves and heat the pin area and drive it straight down using your vise. On the pins you pulled you may have noticed a spriral groove that extends along pin, this is to hold grease. Doors pins need to be greased annually. At the top and botton of hinge there is typically a brass or copper sleeve that pin goes through. It is not unusal for these to wear over time which causes the pins to jam.

  9. #9
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    the problem he had, if i'm not mistaken, was that he couldn't remove the hinge from the car. my little italian cars have the hinges welded in place so it's impossible to remove them from the car. (well, almost impossible) i think the wisconsinjimmy may have misunderstood my post about the air chisel. (air hammer) i use it to drive out the pins when leaving the hinge in place. i also have a little hinge pin press i made, but it doesn't always fit.
    i hate that method of mounting the hinges, it makes refurbishing the darn things into a real project. ream the holes, oversize pins, etc...
    b marler

  10. #10
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    I got it but I have a hinge pin remover from Bob Drake that I used on my Econolines and the tool fit perfect, the rear door hinges are held in place on the body with slotted screws, and either they are rusted to the point of being fused or they used some kind of super torque wrench when installed as I have thrown everything at them but heat which I am scared to use. I used the air chisel to pound on the screws in hopes of knocking the rust loose which did not work. The rear doors we drilled the pins out on the car were fused to the hinge and none of the pins had oil grooves. The door is off and today I am going to give the body a coat of epoxy and high build so I can push it out of the way to work on the doors and fenders. Thanks for all the help

  11. #11
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    probably the best penetrating solvent i've ever used is a home brew of 50/50 acetone and atf. i keep it in one of those plastic ketchup bottles with the squirt top. it really works if you plan ahead and pre-soak your rusty screws. it's also cost effective if you need to make a larger batch and soak an item. restoring old cars requires the breakdown of rusty items, and i've tried a lot of things over the years. this solvent works.
    b marler

  12. #12
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    The only way to get the screws to release is to cur the heads and drill out the shank, they are put in so tight that even kroil will not penetrate there is no way to get at the nuts other than to cut into the B Pillar. I have removed the pins and was able to separate, I then went at it with the media blaster and the Dremel and it is really clean so I am confident things will work out. Today I am cleaning the body with PPG DX330 and by supper hope to put the epoxy on. Well the foundatio is on makes me feel better as rust was right around the corner.
    Thank you for the info always good to have something else in the armory.DSCF0487.jpgDSCF0488.jpgDSCF0489.jpgDSCF0490.jpg
    Last edited by wisconsinjimmy; 11-13-2021 at 03:37 PM. Reason: add photo

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    probably the best penetrating solvent i've ever used is a home brew of 50/50 acetone and atf. i keep it in one of those plastic ketchup bottles with the squirt top. it really works if you plan ahead and pre-soak your rusty screws. it's also cost effective if you need to make a larger batch and soak an item. restoring old cars requires the breakdown of rusty items, and i've tried a lot of things over the years. this solvent works.
    Not trying to steal the thread but info for others. Marler, I get a kick out of your ketchup container usage! I'm always hoarding containers of various sizes in hopes to use them, which I do, but does the acetone not eat away at the plastic in time? And, I like your concoction. Going to try it!

  14. #14

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    (The only way to get the screws to release is to cur the heads and drill out the shank, they are put in so tight that even kroil will not penetrate there is no way to get at the nuts other than to cut into the B Pillar. I have removed the pins and was able to separate, I then went at it with the media blaster and the Dremel and it is really clean so I am confident things will work out. Today I am cleaning the body with PPG DX330 and by supper hope to put the epoxy on. Well the foundatio is on makes me feel better as rust was right around the corner.
    Thank you for the info always good to have something else in the armory.)

    Wisconsinjimmy, do you blast in your shop there or roll outside to minimize dust? Noticed your cool wheels lol.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmystoys View Post
    Not trying to steal the thread but info for others. Marler, I get a kick out of your ketchup container usage! I'm always hoarding containers of various sizes in hopes to use them, which I do, but does the acetone not eat away at the plastic in time? And, I like your concoction. Going to try it!
    It depends on the type of plastic. I use a squeeze bottle with thinner to clean my guns and I've been using the same one for years. It's the same plastic that those gallon milk jugs are made of.

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