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Thread: Best way to remove paint from trunk jambs

  1. #1

    Default Best way to remove paint from trunk jambs

    I want to remove the 67 year old paint and sealer from my trunk jamb. Isn't there a polycarbonate wheel that comes with an integrated arbor that attaches to a drill that will fit down into the jamb? I don't know what to call it and can't find one. Ideas?

    Trunk jamb.jpg

  2. #2
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    Is this what you're looking for?


  3. #3
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    I typically use a spot blaster. I've done a load of 30 model trunk drip rails and find the quickest and easiest way is to mask off and cut the outside perimieter of trunk area using vinyl self stick (10 mil) blocking tape, same tape they use for etching glass. Works great and really fast.

  4. #4

    Cool

    Thanks for the info!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    I typically use a spot blaster. I've done a load of 30 model trunk drip rails and find the quickest and easiest way is to mask off and cut the outside perimieter of trunk area using vinyl self stick (10 mil) blocking tape, same tape they use for etching glass. Works great and really fast.
    x2 on that. plus, you get a real good view of the base metal after blasting. that's rust prone area to be sure.
    b marler

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    x2 on that. plus, you get a real good view of the base metal after blasting. that's rust prone area to be sure.
    Right on the money as always Brian. Most of the 1930's model trunk drip rails had drain tubes on the lower corners of trunks to relieve water that flows from topside. Invariably these clog and rusted out the lower to mid drip rails. Finally in the 40's and 50's most manufacturers change their trunk design where the lid goes over the lower tail pan area which relieved most of this problem. When I do trunk drip rails that have factory drain holes, almost all the 30's and a few 40's and 50's, I cut and drill them out and replace with my own design that is larger and extends over the rear wheel area about 12". Factory drain tubes were typically only an few inches long and clogges really easy. I've cut, removed and replaced so many of these drip rails over the years I can do a complete trunk drip rail in 2-3 hours using either channel or angle iron, just depends on year.

    The point is remove all of the old paint, filler, etc. down to sheet metal to ensure your rails are solid. You don't want water in the trunk area after you have finished the project.
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  7. #7
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    thanks for that ron, the pictures you post are really informative for people tackling these issues. your longer tubes look like a good fix for those pesky drain tubes. your method of replacing the entire drip channel is a really good one. you can upsize the gauge for better stiffness, and there's not a speck of rust to comeback and haunt you later.
    b marler

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