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Thread: Process question

  1. #76

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    That is awesome Ronf, thank you for taking the time to post this up. I am looking at starting the work next week. I will reach out to Upol in the meantime.

    Could you explain the fiberglass pen?

  2. #77
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    That is awesome Ronf, thank you for taking the time to post this up. I am looking at starting the work next week. I will reach out to Upol in the meantime.

    Could you explain the fiberglass pen?
    I also use that pen, it's just strands of glass that I use to sand into a small area like a fisheye so that I can touch it up.


    I also use a lot of those dabbers to touchup those small spots.


  3. #78
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    Dec 2015
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    Ben,

    I would seriously consider getting both of these tools and having them on hand. Nothing works better for those fish eyes, small pops and scratches. Len put me onto the fiberglass pen about a year ago, best investment, even though really inexpensive, I ever made. Abraids the surface in small areas really nice.

  4. #79
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Ben,

    I would seriously consider getting both of these tools and having them on hand. Nothing works better for those fish eyes, small pops and scratches. Len put me onto the fiberglass pen about a year ago, best investment, even though really inexpensive, I ever made. Abraids the surface in small areas really nice.
    And don't forget it comes with a refill in the handle So when you use it enough to wear it out just unscrew the handle and pull out the refill.

  5. #80

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    Well the fender and cowl repaint/blend came out real well. Unfortunately the hood did not. It has a large ghost pattern on it. I ended up sanding the entire hood to 1000, the trouble spot with 800, sprayed the problem spots and re-cleared the whole thing. I have a couple spots like this pic. 0818211620.jpg

    At this point should I just blast the hood with 400 then 600 and repaint it? I am starting to be a little concerned about the film build. I feel like a full hood repaint may be my only real option, I seem to lack the blending skill for this metallic on big flat surfaces at this time. I am also confused why the fender and cowl look fine but the hood does not.

  6. #81
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post

    At this point should I just blast the hood with 400 then 600 and repaint it? I am starting to be a little concerned about the film build. I feel like a full hood repaint may be my only real option, I seem to lack the blending skill for this metallic on big flat surfaces at this time. I am also confused why the fender and cowl look fine but the hood does not.
    Yep, that's what I'd do, scuff the entire hood and shoot a coat or two of base and clear it.

  7. #82
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    Dec 2015
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    Ben,

    When you shot the repair area on the hood did you shoot your final coats of bc using a drop coat method (2X) shot fast and furious over the surface repair area to disperse the metallic prior to cc? Did you keep your product stirred well prior to shooting? Fact is silvers, especially metallics, are one of the most troubling products to shoot as they are prone to tiger stripping. This is the reason I always shoot repair area metallics with drop coats, especially on silver.

    What to do now. Yes, as Len agrees the safest method would be to refinish the entire hood. However, if you are wanting to further your blending knowledge you could try and drop coat the base metallic in those areas and blend. I don't mind problems like this as long as I can learn from them, mistakes are what really adds to our knowledge base for both technique and the product we use.

    Here is a trick I use for repairs just like your hood; after abrading and shooting a few drop coats on repair area, I let the flash time extend out (not beyond TDS for CC application). Over the repair area I spray a "panel wipe" product which emulates a CC shot while it is wet and check the panel for problems. If I still have ghosting I shoot additional drop coats and recheck area until it vanishes.

  8. #83

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    The panel wipe would save me some problems. Do you have a specific name for the product?

    I resprayed the entire hood. It is mostly ok, actually has a lot less trash in it, but does have one area of minor tiger striping, I don't know that anyone else is going to be able to see it. It bothers me but I am inclined to leave well enough alone at this point, low on material and really need to get to assembly.

    At some point in the spray session it occurred to me that the mottling/tiger striping was due to applying the material too heavily and getting uneven wet spots. Once I started laying drop coats as Ron suggested things got a lot better.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
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    164

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    This is where I think the use of intercoat clear may have helped Ben with the blend.

    Spraying the intercoat clear on the prepped panel will wet the area prior to blending. This can help with getting the metalics to lay down better without high-lighting the edge of the blend area. Once you’ve got the blend to your liking, shoot the panel with intercoat clear to check your blend work, you can also look for mottling or tiger striping prior to completing the job with your finish topcoat clear.

  10. #85
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    The panel wipe would save me some problems. Do you have a specific name for the product?

    I resprayed the entire hood. It is mostly ok, actually has a lot less trash in it, but does have one area of minor tiger striping, I don't know that anyone else is going to be able to see it. It bothers me but I am inclined to leave well enough alone at this point, low on material and really need to get to assembly.

    At some point in the spray session it occurred to me that the mottling/tiger striping was due to applying the material too heavily and getting uneven wet spots. Once I started laying drop coats as Ron suggested things got a lot better.
    Ben,

    I use the Custom Restoration Series "panel prep". I typically only use it if I feel there may be a problem with my technique (off day) or shooting a color that is known for tiger striping, yours certainly qualifies as such. I typically only use Gerson tack cloths up until I start the clear coat, I don't wipe between coats of clear. If I use panel wipe on bc I spray sections at a time, closely observe surface for imperfections, wipe area clean using Devilbiss wipes and correct bc as needed prior to cc.

    S-C is correct in that you could use an intercoat to blend for repairs. I didn't mention this before as I didn't want to overload you with info and it would have been an added cost. There are several ways to use a blender for repairs, i.e.shoot it clear or use as a carrier when mixed with bc product. I personally use DBC500 blender followed by a full spray of cc to the panel in question.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #86

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    Good info as always, thank you everyone!

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