TheCoatingStore.com

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 86

Thread: Process question

  1. #61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    You might get that flake out, it’s on a flat surface, that’s in your favor. I keep tweezers in the paint booth for when things like that happen. (Tweezers, long needles, artists brush, you get the idea.)
    If It landed there after the second coat was applied there, (seems possible depending on how the spraying order went) you can get it and still barely have enough film build. Or, you could get it out and re-clear the panel. Just don’t break through to base and you’ll be fine.

    That falcon brings back some fond childhood memories…

    I am tempted to give it a try. I still have a couple of trim parts to shoot so I might just plan on re clearing that on that day. I would be pretty upset if I sand through to base, I suppose it is a risk you take though. I tried to gently pull it out with a tack rag when it happened, just wouldn't grab. I was worried about making a mess of it. Tweezers would have been brilliant, or a barbed needle, I will add them to my tool kit. My brain was focused on the task at hand and I did not have the awareness to realize it would be a lot easier to sand clear flat than it would to get that flake out of there.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    Ben,

    Knowing your products or having a good source of information for the EXACT products you used when a problem occurs (jobber, supplier, forum, etc.) is key for a repair if you are not familiar with them.

    For instance, if this chip was locked in with clear and occurred in my typically shot clear coat of PPG DCU2021 I would wet sand the entire panel using 2500g wet, sand problem area with 1500g wet out beyond the chip by 4 or 5 inches, mix up a small amount of PPG DC3000 clear (DC3000 is used for 2-3 panel shots only as it sets fast) with base coat using 1:1:1:1/2 (1 part clear, 1 part base, 1 part hardner, 1/2 part reducer) and shoot 2-3 coats over just the problem area with my air brush using a #1 tip. I shoot first coat tight on the problem area and extend subsequent coats by 1-2 inches until problem is hidden and I have sufficient build for buffing. Because I have quite a bit of experience with the higher end PPG products I know I could easily fix that chip, so a jobber, supplier or experienced painter with your products can help you get through this.

  3. #63

    Default

    Thank you Ronf, Once I get the car to a driveable state I will take it over to the supplier and see what they can recommend.

  4. #64

    Default

    Turns out those primer chips were right on top of the base coat, slowly sanded into them and saw a little bit of green before the flake was totally gone, I did try airbrushing a little clear over and buffing but you can see the sand through, so I tried a little base, then clear and that also shows (like a little circular tiger stripe) so I guess I am into a panel respray?

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,560

    Default Variables

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    Turns out those primer chips were right on top of the base coat, slowly sanded into them and saw a little bit of green before the flake was totally gone, I did try airbrushing a little clear over and buffing but you can see the sand through, so I tried a little base, then clear and that also shows (like a little circular tiger stripe) so I guess I am into a panel respray?
    If it's one spot I would normally blend over and around it (depending on where it is on the panel) using a detail gun. I normally don't like shooting an entire panel because it may not match the surrounding panels with a metallic color even if it's from the same can of paint. Room temperature, air pressure, application technique, base coat type, etc, etc..... tricky stuff, that's why I blend. But shooting the entire panel is usually easier.

  6. #66

    Default

    I think it is worth a try.

    Is this the correct process?

    Sand entire panel to 800
    Spot and blend the offending area with base
    Reclear entire panel

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    I think it is worth a try.

    Is this the correct process?

    Sand entire panel to 800
    Spot and blend the offending area with base
    Reclear entire panel
    If you're using "good" clear I'd sand around the spot with 800 where color is being applied but I'd sand the area to be blended and cleared using 1500 or 2000 grit.

  8. #68

    Default

    It is a pretty low end clear. Upol.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    It is a pretty low end clear. Upol.
    I don't know how that clear will react to adding another base coat on top but give it a try. If you sand through the clear over the problem spot it might be wise to coat it with more clear, let it harden, re-sand then re-apply your color and clear.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    I think it is worth a try.

    Is this the correct process?

    Sand entire panel to 800
    Spot and blend the offending area with base
    Reclear entire panel
    Ben,

    What is your plan for blending? You are going to need either a specific blending agent for your Upol products or a proven method and procedure for blending metallics. For instance, I could sand entire panel with 1500g wet, sand offended area to 1000g wet, shoot 2 or 3 base color drop coats starting with a tight pattern that extends out each coat using my SRI Devilbiss touch up gun, followed by clearing the entire panel. Another method I use; on light color metallics such as white, gray and silver I can sand affected area out several inches beyond repair to blend and mix up 1 part base with 1 part clear with 1 part hardner with 1/2 part reducer (1:1:1:1/2), shoot first coat tight and extend subsequent coats until area is covered followed by shooting straight reducer beyond the repair area (wet on wet). Sand entire panel with 2500 wet and polish out.
    However, these are methods I know work with the PPG products I use and may need to be adjusted for your Upol.

  11. #71

    Default

    I don't really have a good plan, or enough experience. i was going to try some things and see if I could get it to come out. It isn't very efficient, but would let me learn. My intent was to mask the surrounding panels, sand the whole panel to 800 spray one medium coat of reduced base right on top of the spot that is bad, then shoot a couple of drop coats, the first a little bigger than the damage spot, then the second a little bigger than that, then spray a coat of straight reducer (slow reducer on every step) then shoot clear. Maybe I need to reach out to upol.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    I typically use one of three methods to repair areas such as your. I can either sand entire panel with 1500 wet, sand repair area too 1000 wet, drop coat in 2-3 coats of metallic base with a close pattern (while extending each coat out) on my SRI mini gun and re-clear the entire panel. Or I can mix up products as previously noted in this thread using 1:1:1:1/2 and shoot the area with an air brush followed by cut and buff. I dug up some old pics of my current project that might help explain this. However, for this method to work I would absolutely talk too Upol first as I have no experience with that product. Too me, knowing your products and proven methods are key to repairs. This bc product custom mix (limited toners) is $450 a qt, for this project I purchased 1.5 gallons at around $1500 (for just bc) and I get production shop pricing from my jobber, so I don't need mistakes.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Ronf; 08-12-2021 at 02:00 PM.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default Repair continued

    Continued....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    For those small vapor pops I use a variety of tools that make repairs fast and easy. You need these on hand if you don't already have them.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Niesen View Post
    I don't really have a good plan, or enough experience. i was going to try some things and see if I could get it to come out. It isn't very efficient, but would let me learn. My intent was to mask the surrounding panels, sand the whole panel to 800 spray one medium coat of reduced base right on top of the spot that is bad, then shoot a couple of drop coats, the first a little bigger than the damage spot, then the second a little bigger than that, then spray a coat of straight reducer (slow reducer on every step) then shoot clear. Maybe I need to reach out to upol.
    No way would I sand that entire panel to 800. Sand the entire panel to 1500 and then come back and try your posted method by sanding damaged area to either 800 or 1000 (I prefer 1000 myself) shoot 1st bc tight on damage and extend out subsequent coats as you go until covered (over reduce bc just a bit over TDS). Follow this with CC (over reduced 30-40%) and finally hit area with straight reducer. After repair the entire panel can then be hit with 2500 wet and polished out. Again, I have no Upol experience and would contact manufacture prior to this repair. I'm hoping a member here with Upol experience can step in and advise both of us.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •