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Thread: Buffing

  1. #1
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    Default Buffing

    Am I the only one who cut and buffs a car, then finds little things they don't like and hit that area again with sandpaper and buff again lol

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    Am I the only one who cut and buffs a car, then finds little things they don't like and hit that area again with sandpaper and buff again lol
    It depends on a lot of variables. If you're having a dust problem then there's always small particles everywhere that need to be dealt with. If the surface hasn't been degreased properly you can get craters that can be a problem. If the sanding during the surface prep wasn't done properly you can get scratches showing in your top coats. So "no" you're not the only one who finds more work after buffing.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcode View Post
    Am I the only one who cut and buffs a car, then finds little things they don't like and hit that area again with sandpaper and buff again lol
    Hell no you are not the only one....lol. Doing a show quality paint where ALL the peel is removed and surface is dead flat, all the while trying to obtain a deep high gloss finish, almost always causes extended work. Now add in a deep gloss black paint job where everything shows...geez, just make sure you have plenty of beer on hand. Many times I have had areas where I had to go back starting with 2000+- grit and work back up on small areas to remove deeper scratch marks. This is the reason I lay plenty of CC on as I can go back and fix these areas with confidence knowing I will not break through to the base. This brings up a very important point when painting a project; We all strive too have good lighting when applying product, the same has too be said for color sanding as well. Len is constantly stressing the importance of lighting for P&B work and I agree. As a note, don't be afraid to use powdered guide coat when color sanding after initial scratch (esp. in poor lighting) but it is no substitute for proper lighting as too see those scratches. You may even consider changing your shop lighting to LED's as it helps to identify imperfections.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Hell no...

    no and no..

    it means i lose money.....one shot deal...dont care

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    one shot deal...dont care
    Sounds like high school days!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Hell no you are not the only one....lol. Doing a show quality paint where ALL the peel is removed and surface is dead flat, all the while trying to obtain a deep high gloss finish, almost always causes extended work. Now add in a deep gloss black paint job where everything shows...geez, just make sure you have plenty of beer on hand. Many times I have had areas where I had to go back starting with 2000+- grit and work back up on small areas to remove deeper scratch marks. This is the reason I lay plenty of CC on as I can go back and fix these areas with confidence knowing I will not break through to the base. This brings up a very important point when painting a project; We all strive too have good lighting when applying product, the same has too be said for color sanding as well. Len is constantly stressing the importance of lighting for P&B work and I agree. As a note, don't be afraid to use powdered guide coat when color sanding after initial scratch (esp. in poor lighting) but it is no substitute for proper lighting as too see those scratches. You may even consider changing your shop lighting to LED's as it helps to identify imperfections.

    I put tons of LED lights in. I probably see too much in the paint that will never show lol I am also a big believer in putting plenty of CC on.

    I typically sand with 1200, 1500, then 2000. I go over the dust spots first with 800-1000. It's usually about 98% good, with some scratches that need a little more work, or a dust bump is still up a little.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    Hell no...

    no and no..

    it means i lose money.....one shot deal...dont care
    I charge by the hour, so there is that lol

  8. #8
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    Yea, I hate this part of the job..

    My jobs are consistently good regarding shine and orange peel...

    But I get dirt and debris just like anyone else...

    This is my procedure....i always cure paint well before cutting or polishing, IR or sun or heat or time..I try to polish while there is still protective cover on car....dust and dirt I scrape off with razor blade or one of my Tungsten steel blocks, mirka or finish....jus cut the heads down so less sanding....I have 2 inch sander and 3 inch sander, I can go quickly over dirt spots with either 1500 or 2000 dry....Idry over wet as much as possible...or just by hand dry sanding, keeping my area as small as possible...then I use 3000 grit sponge on 2 or 3 inch Mirka orbital sander to get scratches out, then 5000....now I like to with 3 inch Mirka polisher over these small spots using Farecla compound, concentrating on small spots where I worked to get shine back...once Iím happy, now I bust out 6 inch orbital polisher with wool or foam...always lots of light always checking using sunlight...always trying to maintain OEM orange peel..

    Now final wipe and if possible, if sun out, I will take car out to check if I missed anything..

    If ok, now I go to wash and clean..


    If the finish is OEM and old and faded, then I might hit it with 2000 grit on da then 3000 sponge and then polish..

    If piece of shit Asian car with cheap thin clear coat, well, jus light polish...no risk

    If I want to get a mirror finish, I will sand clear with 2000 or 1500 grit dry Sunmight film disk, level orange peel first..

  9. #9

    Default

    Most buffing compounds have glaze in them which
    fill the scratches and hides them.
    If you wash with soap and water between grits to remove the glaze
    you will see the scratches better.
    I use a dish soap like Dawn, but any will work.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCCLARK View Post
    Most buffing compounds have glaze in them which
    fill the scratches and hides them.
    If you wash with soap and water between grits to remove the glaze
    you will see the scratches better.
    I use a dish soap like Dawn, but any will work.
    That's right, it could look good initially but a day or two later you could see scratches or dullness as the lubricant goes away. We use grease and wax remover when the buffing is almost finished to remove the lubricant and expose any left over scratches.

  11. #11
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    I use something called Spray and Shine by Presta or grass and wax remover with some alcohol in it....always cleaning with Costco Kirkland microfiber..

    I avoid dish soap as sometimes it leaves residue


    You guys made a good point about glaze...

  12. #12
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Yes sir...

    Quote Originally Posted by baubau View Post
    I use something called Spray and Shine by Presta or grass and wax remover with some alcohol in it....always cleaning with Costco Kirkland microfiber..

    I avoid dish soap as sometimes it leaves residue


    You guys made a good point about glaze...
    I've used about everything PRESTA makes (or their twin sister manufacturer). And I ordered here from LEN at less than my Shop Supply was selling it for. Many buckets of Ultra Cutting Cream (UCC) compound. And their Swirl Remover is great.

    Henry

  13. #13
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    Henry, if you ever come across Farecla g360 compound, try that...

    The best i have ever used...

  14. #14
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    Default Buffing

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    I've used about everything PRESTA makes (or their twin sister manufacturer). And I ordered here from LEN at less than my Shop Supply was selling it for. Many buckets of Ultra Cutting Cream (UCC) compound. And their Swirl Remover is great.

    Henry
    That Presta was what I 1st learned on, Cutting Cream and Swirl Remover..Thanks to Len That stuff was good. All the high end compound makers say they use no glazes(fillers) but I think that is a big line and most do use them. I still like the swirl remover after some initial cutting with other compounds too.
    dlm ny country

  15. #15
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    Nov 2005
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    Default Yes sir...

    Quote Originally Posted by dlmrun2002 View Post
    That Presta was what I 1st learned on, Cutting Cream and Swirl Remover..Thanks to Len That stuff was good. All the high end compound makers say they use no glazes(fillers) but I think that is a big line and most do use them. I still like the swirl remover after some initial cutting with other compounds too.
    dlm ny country
    I gave in when ROBERT came out with (True Finish) "SURE FINISH". Loved the PRESTA but the 3 steps got old compared with Sure Finish (one product and merely change pads!) But yet, I still kept a container of Swirl Remover on had - great stuff!

    Henry

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