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Thread: Plastic repair

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Boring Oregon
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    4,067

    Default Plastic repair

    My buddy has a 71 Chevy Vega. There is a plastic panel on the back lower valance area. It of course is about 1/8 thick and has numerous cracks we need to repair.

    We are using some of those metal hot staples across the cracks to reinforce them.
    s-l1600.jpg

    I have some JB Weld Plastic bonding adhesive, a 2 part product.

    I also have some short hair evercoat filler I will put on the visual side.

    My question is, what is the best to reinforce the back side of a plastic repair, the JB Weld or just short hair bondo?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    My buddy has a 71 Chevy Vega. There is a plastic panel on the back lower valance area. It of course is about 1/8 thick and has numerous cracks we need to repair.

    We are using some of those metal hot staples across the cracks to reinforce them.

    I have some JB Weld Plastic bonding adhesive, a 2 part product.

    I also have some short hair evercoat filler I will put on the visual side.

    My question is, what is the best to reinforce the back side of a plastic repair, the JB Weld or just short hair bondo?
    If it's a flexible plastic we never use a filler that isn't flexible like fiberglass or JB Weld.

    In most cases we use the method and products shown HERE.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2013
    Location
    Boring Oregon
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    Default

    It's a hard, rigid plastic, not flexible like a bumper cover. Think like hard plastic interior panels. They are about 1/8" thick and bolt under the bumper.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    It's a hard, rigid plastic, not flexible like a bumper cover. Think like hard plastic interior panels. They are about 1/8" thick and bolt under the bumper.
    After many many years of doing this work we've surrendered to using one brand of plastic repair products. On rigid plastic we use Fusor adhesion promoter and Fusor 100EZ rigid plastic repair products. There may be other products that will work but our trial and error days led us to Fusor.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    31,050

    Default

    HD, clean the backside of the panel well with preferably soap and water then wax and grease remover then scuff up the back side of the plastic panel with a relatively coarse sandpaper like 80 grit to 180 grit. Next apply some of that drywall mesh tape that comes in a roll (or you can buy the same stuff from a paint store designed specifically for this type of plastic repair, also fiberglass repair). Then apply an adhesive with a squeegee like the Fusor Len is talking about. Make sure the adhesive is for rigid plastics repair. Been doing it that way for at least 25 years on snowmobile hoods and anything else made of a rigid plastic. In fact I have to repair a damaged plastic hood for a John Deere tractor.

    Do the backside first as described, then tackle the front side.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,637

    Default

    If you cannot get Fusor, then some other plastic repair stuff, 2K, for the back...

    FUSOR is one of the best, I always have it in my shop...

    I weld the plastic now whenever I get the chance, but always some reinforcement with mesh in th3 back for nice expensive jobs

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