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Thread: Door to quarter panel edges

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
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    Default Door to quarter panel edges

    I did some welding on the edges of the door and quarter panel in order to get that perfect gap all along the edges. I did my best to grind and weld, grind and weld, but I feel that it still may not be perfectly finished along the edges. Will bondo hold up along the edge if I put a little on and sand down or what would be the best approach?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    44,212

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsand160 View Post
    I did some welding on the edges of the door and quarter panel in order to get that perfect gap all along the edges. I did my best to grind and weld, grind and weld, but I feel that it still may not be perfectly finished along the edges. Will bondo hold up along the edge if I put a little on and sand down or what would be the best approach?
    I would use short strand or milled fiberglass filler just because it's stronger than Bondo-type fillers and less likely to chip.


  3. #3
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    Nov 2020
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    16

    Default All metal okay to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    I would use short strand or milled fiberglass filler just because it's stronger than Bondo-type fillers and less likely to chip.

    What about the filler that is called All Metal, it has particles of aluminum in it I think?

  4. #4
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsand160 View Post
    What about the filler that is called All Metal, it has particles of aluminum in it I think?
    I've never used All Metal for strength so I don't know how well it would perform. I know it's moisture resistant but I don't know about chipping.


  5. #5
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    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    i've used all metal for edge touch up with mixed results. it can be a little brittle when cured and will chip if struck or scraped. lens suggestion of milled glass is a good one, and is what i use if i absolutely have to fill a little imperfection on an edge. really though, taking a little extra time to add a dab of weld so it can be filed into shape is the best way.
    b marler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    856

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsand160 View Post
    I did some welding on the edges of the door and quarter panel in order to get that perfect gap all along the edges. I did my best to grind and weld, grind and weld, but I feel that it still may not be perfectly finished along the edges. Will bondo hold up along the edge if I put a little on and sand down or what would be the best approach?
    Just as bmarler states you need to continue building up your door edge with weldment. When I narrow door gaps for custom work I over build the welding on door edge and then grind starting with a 4" grinder, with a new flap disc (40 or 80 grit), held flat to the face. Run the grinder lightly over the surface in a quick sweeping motion. Always use a new flat flap disc to stay flat, square and parallel to the door edge face. LIGHTLY go over the face of door edge to rough it in and follow it up by using a 2" die grinder (40 or 80 grit flat disc) with door closed and disc running along inside edge at a low speed. Sweep your 2" die grinder disc (non-flap) really fast and light until you work it to your preferred gaps. I can do a single door edge too .050" (+- .010") gap in this manner in about 45 minutes to an hour and follow this up with SS fiber filler. At this point your only using the SS filler for water proofing and fill your weld lines. A useful tip here is to make yourself a wedge gauge block, slide wedge into a body line you are trying to achieve and mark the wedge. Use this block for all your body fitment lines for uniformity.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
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    16

    Default Awesome help

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Just as bmarler states you need to continue building up your door edge with weldment. When I narrow door gaps for custom work I over build the welding on door edge and then grind starting with a 4" grinder, with a new flap disc (40 or 80 grit), held flat to the face. Run the grinder lightly over the surface in a quick sweeping motion. Always use a new flat flap disc to stay flat, square and parallel to the door edge face. LIGHTLY go over the face of door edge to rough it in and follow it up by using a 2" die grinder (40 or 80 grit flat disc) with door closed and disc running along inside edge at a low speed. Sweep your 2" die grinder disc (non-flap) really fast and light until you work it to your preferred gaps. I can do a single door edge too .050" (+- .010") gap in this manner in about 45 minutes to an hour and follow this up with SS fiber filler. At this point your only using the SS filler for water proofing and fill your weld lines. A useful tip here is to make yourself a wedge gauge block, slide wedge into a body line you are trying to achieve and mark the wedge. Use this block for all your body fitment lines for uniformity.
    Thanks for the help. I think I will weld a little more, and then try and grind as even as I can. I think thatís really my only concern is to get a uniform grind all along the edge, but you gave me some great ideas.

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