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Thread: Door Jamb Rust. Opinions Please

  1. #1
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    Default Door Jamb Rust. Opinions Please

    Hi all. Been lurking here for about three years now. Amazed at the experience here on these forums. Get up enough confidence to finally ask for some advice. I have a pic of my door jamb on my '79 Ford pick up. Hopefully you can see my rust issue. Where the exterior sheet metal 90's into the inner jamb and is joined vertically for about 14"-16" and the horizontal joint just above my lower felt pen line. These joints are swelling with rust from behind. How much would you guys remove for repair? I have marked out with felt pen a section I'm thinking of replacing. Does this make sense? Am I removing too much? Any remarks are appreciated thanks, Jim. Sorry, haven't figured out how to flip pics up. Practice makes perfect lol.20210102_155548.jpg
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  2. #2
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    I would try not to cut into the door jamb at all. I would make a cut in the skin with the white paint and try to address all the rust through that hole. The door jamb is structural and should be left alone if possible.

    Bob K

  3. #3
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    If you just use a fiberglass filler to fill the problem areas and inject wax from holes drilled through the inside panel it would probably last quite a while. I would also see if the entire jamb could be replaced rather than just sectioning it. I've never seen that problem so I'd also have to study it on the inside.




  4. #4
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    Well, that wasn't quite the answer that I was expecting. I'll see if I can clean it up, spray some cavity wax in there and hope for the best. Thanks guys. Don't want to do more work than I have to!

  5. #5
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    Default Hmmmmm....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmystoys View Post
    Well, that wasn't quite the answer that I was expecting. I'll see if I can clean it up, spray some cavity wax in there and hope for the best. Thanks guys. Don't want to do more work than I have to!
    When doing this work to any vehicle, one must consider what they want out of it. Show quality, couple - three year repair or to daily driver. You have options but at the end of the day, it's really what you expect and want from the repair. Keep us posted.

    Henry

  6. #6
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    So I cleaned it up a bit today with a needle scaler. Looks like I have a couple of very small holes. The lower horizontal joint looked swollen a bit so I cleaned the seam sealer out of it. I'll try and prep it up a bit, reseal it and treat the rest from behind. The holes, I think I will cut out as minimal as possible and replace with new metal, treat the rust by neutralizing it and when I'm done that spray some cavity wax in behind everything I can reach and hope for the best! Any suggestions? Am I wasting my time trying to replace the holes with new metal? I'm sure there's other areas that are probably negligible but that is all I could detect. Don't want to get too carried away. Not a professional at this but would like to try and do what I can.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    When doing this work to any vehicle, one must consider what they want out of it. Show quality, couple - three year repair or to daily driver. You have options but at the end of the day, it's really what you expect and want from the repair. Keep us posted.

    Henry
    Hi Henry. Thanks for your comments. I am definitely not capable of 'show quality'. Lets clear the air on that one lol. I would just like something that won't rust through right away. A few years would be nice.
    Last edited by Jimmystoys; 01-05-2021 at 11:52 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmystoys View Post
    Hi Henry. Thanks for your comments. I am definitely not cable of 'show quality'. Lets clear the air on that one lol. I would just like something that won't rust through right away. A few years would be nice.
    You will also want to see if you can stop moisture from getting to that area and if you can't stop it then try to vent that area so that the moisture dries and doesn't linger causing the repair to fail.

  9. #9
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    Default USUALLY !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmystoys View Post
    Hi Henry. Thanks for your comments. I am definitely not cable of 'show quality'. Lets clear the air on that one lol. I would just like something that won't rust through right away. A few years would be nice.
    Usually, I would NEVER disagree with another member. But in your case I'll make the exception and tell you I DON'T AGREE with what you said here, "I am definitely not cable of 'show quality'."

    Let me just say, YOU have no idea what you're capable of. You do have a desire of the trade or you would never have done what you did to your truck. Further, where I'm coming from is many years of enjoying this site (as a member - just like you), I've been witness to MANY novice people to this trade/art who ended up with producing automotive projects that yielded FIRST PLACE in shows. No one HAS to do this but always have a plan, UNDERSTAND the plan (all the ifs, ands or buts). Also, things like Len's last post to you about keeping your repair dry and moisture and venting.

    I commend you for what you are doing and understand, there are SO many variables to this work but you do have a small ARMY of members here to help you out.

    Anyway, you're capable of ANYTHING you set your mind to. More 'hands on' is a good thing! Keep up posted.

    Henry

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    Usually, I would NEVER disagree with another member. But in your case I'll make the exception and tell you I DON'T AGREE with what you said here, "I am definitely not cable of 'show quality'."

    Let me just say, YOU have no idea what you're capable of. You do have a desire of the trade or you would never have done what you did to your truck. Further, where I'm coming from is many years of enjoying this site (as a member - just like you), I've been witness to MANY novice people to this trade/art who ended up with producing automotive projects that yielded FIRST PLACE in shows. No one HAS to do this but always have a plan, UNDERSTAND the plan (all the ifs, ands or buts). Also, things like Len's last post to you about keeping your repair dry and moisture and venting.

    I commend you for what you are doing and understand, there are SO many variables to this work but you do have a small ARMY of members here to help you out.

    Anyway, you're capable of ANYTHING you set your mind to. More 'hands on' is a good thing! Keep up posted.

    Henry
    Well that made me feel pretty good Henry. I would settle for mediocre lol. I have the desire and listening to you guys with your experiences sure helps. Thanks for the kind words!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    You will also want to see if you can stop moisture from getting to that area and if you can't stop it then try to vent that area so that the moisture dries and doesn't linger causing the repair to fail.
    I agree with you Len. I'm certain there's a lot of condensation trapped in these large open cavities. Warm interior and cold exterior with no airflow is just an automatic moisture compartment. I'm surprised it's lasted this long. I wonder how newer vehicles are built. Do they insulate them? Create cross ventilation? Don't know if anyone can answer that.

  12. #12
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    Not sure how to deal with these small holes that I have. The rest of the rusty, but not see through metal, I was going to treat with a rust neutralizer then coat with a Por 15, prep it, then epoxy coat everything before I paint. What do you guys think? Going in the right direction? I know some guys don't care for the Por. Por 15 is a neutralizer in itself I believe. Any comments?

  13. #13
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    you're in a bit of a tough spot for sure. the only way to stop the rust is to get it all out. you know it's growing between those layers so if you don't open it up the best you'll do is slow it down.
    is there any way to get a tool into the backside and clean off whatever rust there is on that? then it might be possible to weld up the holes if you back up the area with a copper spoon. the danger is that you'll make a bigger hole if the metal is too damaged.
    since you don't really have too much damage besides the rust issue, maybe just clean the rust as best you can, treat it with picklex, coat it with zero rust or maybe rustoleum, and apply a good seam sealer to cover any perforations. cavity wax the inner and keep an eye on it.
    a permanent repair would definitely involve opening up the seam.
    b marler

  14. #14
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    I've been thinking about this a lot. Put a camera down in behind and had a better look. There is a lot of rust, everywhere. So the trucks forty one years old now. It has been treated probably with something lightly from the factory. I wonder how much longer it would last if I left it? How long would it last if I just neutralized it and hoped that it didn't return for awhile, 10-20 years? The way things are going, probably won't be able to purchase gasoline soon lol. Everything will be electric! I don't think I'm capable, at this time anyways, to remove and replace everything rusty as a professional would. But I can certainly neutralize it best as I can from the inside and seal it from the exterior and lay a couple or so layers of epoxy before a few layers of final top coat. I would hate to cut the crap out of everything and do a terrible weld job. This is my opinion as a rookie. So I think this will be my direction. Feel free to let me know what you guys think. As always, advice is appreciated.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmystoys View Post
    I've been thinking about this a lot. Put a camera down in behind and had a better look. There is a lot of rust, everywhere. So the trucks forty one years old now. It has been treated probably with something lightly from the factory. I wonder how much longer it would last if I left it? How long would it last if I just neutralized it and hoped that it didn't return for awhile, 10-20 years? The way things are going, probably won't be able to purchase gasoline soon lol. Everything will be electric! I don't think I'm capable, at this time anyways, to remove and replace everything rusty as a professional would. But I can certainly neutralize it best as I can from the inside and seal it from the exterior and lay a couple or so layers of epoxy before a few layers of final top coat. I would hate to cut the crap out of everything and do a terrible weld job. This is my opinion as a rookie. So I think this will be my direction. Feel free to let me know what you guys think. As always, advice is appreciated.
    you're probably on the right path. i don't think i'd be putting a lot of chemicals back there with no way to neutralize them, but i would be using something to stabilize the area. maybe something like waxoyl, or the cavity wax len suggested, or maybe some other wax/oil product. i think zep makes some good preservative too. then clean, treat, and seal the outside. leave the welder out of the equation for now.
    lots of old cars were made with box sections that got little or no protection at all, so drilling small holes so you can fit a wand in there and spray these preservatives is a common thing to do and works very well at stopping the surface rust from progressing.
    b marler

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