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Thread: Painting my engine bay and chassis

  1. #1

    Post Painting my engine bay and chassis

    I'm painting my engine bay in a 1994 Ford and while I'm at it, I'm also painting the steering linkage, chassis and a few other things.

    This is the paint I'll be using for my engine bay. I'll be spraying it.
    I may use it for the steering linkage as well.

    Acrylic epoxy primer:
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-up230q

    Acrylic Urethane single stage paint:
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-up312q

    Do you think Acrylic epoxy primer and Acrylic Urethane single stage paint is durable enough for the chassis as well?
    I have POR15 available to use but it needs a rough finish for proper adhesion but I'd like to smooth up most of these surfaces.

    What's a good way to plug up these large holes (circled in red) so paint doesn't get into the cab?
    I don't have access to the back of most of these holes because of the dashboard.
    For a couple holes I can stuff a rag or towel back in there. On other holes though, the rag would just fall down inside.
    Untitled.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,135

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    I donít know how much space is behind the hole but I would fill the space with cloth like a towel or a beach towel or even a blanket if itís a big area. Then cut a piece of masking paper a little bigger than the hole and tuck it in to protect the cloth. It also prevents lint from the cloth from being disturbed by the air blast from the paint gun. Aluminum foil around the wires and small objects you donít want paint on is an easy way to mask.

    Bob K

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    1,711

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    how do you plan to use the vehicle when you're done? that is a 2k paint so how does it touch up if you get chips? for cars that get driven i like the zero rust paint. it doesn't need an activator and is super easy to touch up. goes direct to metal too.
    i wouldn't hesitate to put 2k products on the firewall, but not the chassis. por15 is a tough product, but when it chips or cracks moisture can weep under it unnoticed and damage the metal.
    but if it's a trailer queen and not likely to get damaged you can go with anything.
    can't you mask those big holes from the other side?
    b marler

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks folks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    Then cut a piece of masking paper a little bigger than the hole and tuck it in to protect the cloth. It also prevents lint from the cloth from being disturbed by the air blast from the paint gun.
    Thanks, that's a good idea for the holes I'll be able to use a towel in.
    Still need to figure out the holes that are too big for a towel.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    how do you plan to use the vehicle when you're done?
    Daily driver + light offroading for the next 20+ years here in Central Texas where the winters are mild.

    I'll always live in a mild or warm "winter" area because I can't deal with the cold and am happiest in 85-95* weather.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    for cars that get driven i like the zero rust paint. it doesn't need an activator and is super easy to touch up. goes direct to metal too.
    Isn't Zero Rust basically just like Rustoleum? Works great to prevent rust but it's not as durable as the POR15 type variants.
    So it's more susceptible to things like rocks bounced against the frame at 70MPH.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i wouldn't hesitate to put 2k products on the firewall, but not the chassis. por15 is a tough product, but when it chips or cracks moisture can weep under it unnoticed and damage the metal.
    I think POR15 and similar products recommend two light coats instead of one heavy one, to reduce chips/cracks from allowing moisture underneath the product.
    I'm lucky that I live in a low-rust environment.

    I can see your point in this regard. The Zero Rust would scratch and be easily repaired, while the POR15 type products are more durable but when they eventually do become damaged, they might crack and be more difficult to repair.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    can't you mask those big holes from the other side?
    Not the upper ones. A huge dashboard is in the way.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    164

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    Quote Originally Posted by CZ Eddie View Post
    .

    What's a good way to plug up these large holes (circled in red) so paint doesn't get into the cab?
    I don't have access to the back of most of these holes because of the dashboard.
    For a couple holes I can stuff a rag or towel back in there. On other holes though, the rag would just fall down inside.
    Untitled.jpg
    Just put tape on the backside of the openings, that is, use a wide masking type tape, or even duct tape, gorilla tape etc. Put your fingers in the hole with a piece of tape cut to size and stick it to the inside wall of the hole so half of the sticky part of the tape is facing outward, do this all around the hole. Then cut a piece of thick masking paper, or cardboard just smaller than the hole and place it on the sticky part of the tape.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by S-C View Post
    Just put tape on the backside of the openings, that is, use a wide masking type tape, or even duct tape, gorilla tape etc. Put your fingers in the hole with a piece of tape cut to size and stick it to the inside wall of the hole so half of the sticky part of the tape is facing outward, do this all around the hole. Then cut a piece of thick masking paper, or cardboard just smaller than the hole and place it on the sticky part of the tape.
    I love this idea, thanks!

  7. #7

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    Well, I made a decision based on me being a newbie and wanting to paint my exterior as well.
    I figured it would be best to stick with just one system instead of a product from this mfg and a different product from that mfg.

    So I ordered up a gallon of SPI Epoxy Primer and Activator.
    I'll use that for the chassis, steering linkage and engine bay.
    For everything.

    Then when I paint the outside of my quarter panels with the SPI single-stage and high-build primer, it'll all still be "one system".
    "One throat to choke" if anything goes wrong.

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