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Thread: 1961 corvette plan???

  1. #1
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    Default 1961 corvette plan???

    Starting a new project 1961 corvette. This car is mostly original paint but it is cracking and chipping. I will strip the paint with a razor blade unless someone else has a better idea? Will a soda blaster hurt fiberglass?
    Once car is strip do I sand the fiberglass with 80 grit to get primer to stick? Do I apply epoxy as my base coat then my primer?
    Been reading people like using slick sand on vettes does anyone on here recommend that? If I use slick sand do I need to use epoxy first or not? Lastly slick sand is so pourus is it ok to wash with water when I am done sanding befor I apply my good primer?
    Thanks everyone for your input.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhenkel View Post
    Starting a new project 1961 corvette. This car is mostly original paint but it is cracking and chipping. I will strip the paint with a razor blade unless someone else has a better idea? Will a soda blaster hurt fiberglass?
    Once car is strip do I sand the fiberglass with 80 grit to get primer to stick? Do I apply epoxy as my base coat then my primer?
    Been reading people like using slick sand on vettes does anyone on here recommend that? If I use slick sand do I need to use epoxy first or not? Lastly slick sand is so pourus is it ok to wash with water when I am done sanding befor I apply my good primer?
    Thanks everyone for your input.
    Fiberglass is a polyester resin with chopped fiberglass strands. I would not use an epoxy primer over bare fiberglass panels. Slick Sand or any other brand of polyester primer (basically spray "bondo" (generic term) would be fine over bare fiberglass, since both are polyester based products.

    That does not apply to newer Corvettes which are SMC (Sheet Molded Compound) panels and not actual fiberglass panels. Instead of a polyester resin SMC uses epoxy resin.

    I have a hunch no matter which way you strip that old vette you ARE going to need a very heavy primer (like Slick Sand or Featherfil etc.) And be prepared for a lot of long board guide coat block sanding.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhenkel View Post
    Starting a new project 1961 corvette. This car is mostly original paint but it is cracking and chipping. I will strip the paint with a razor blade unless someone else has a better idea? Will a soda blaster hurt fiberglass?
    Once car is strip do I sand the fiberglass with 80 grit to get primer to stick? Do I apply epoxy as my base coat then my primer?
    Been reading people like using slick sand on vettes does anyone on here recommend that? If I use slick sand do I need to use epoxy first or not? Lastly slick sand is so pourus is it ok to wash with water when I am done sanding befor I apply my good primer?
    Thanks everyone for your input.
    I had a steel car stripped using soda blasting. The company that did the stripping had a portable system that they towed to our shop and did the work outside. It created the biggest mess you can imagine so I never did it again. I'd recommend either chemical stripper or sanding off the old coatings. Once you have the surface clean follow Phil's advice by using body filler and/or Slick Sand and block sand to remove the surface variations.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2013
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    in my experience, epoxy over polyester is fine. the reverse is not as good. i like epoxy for it's excellent sealing capability very strong bond to sanded polyester. keep in mind though, my experience with fiberglass is primarily marine.
    so as phil says, polyester like slick sand would be a great choice over the bare polyester fiberglass panels to get everything level, but i think i would seal it all with epoxy later.
    b marler

  5. #5
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    I use a butterfly air sander for paint removal on fiberglass panels with 40g wet paper. After paint removal I used to shoot Slick Sand straight on raw panel followed by epoxy primer. I now use Evercoat Optex 4:1 followed by guide coat, sand out to 600g and straight to paint. If you remove and store any of your fiberglass panels long term do not store them in an over hot environment as you may have fitment issues down the road.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    I use a butterfly air sander for paint removal on fiberglass panels with 40g wet paper. After paint removal I used to shoot Slick Sand straight on raw panel followed by epoxy primer. I now use Evercoat Optex 4:1 followed by guide coat, sand out to 600g and straight to paint. If you remove and store any of your fiberglass panels long term do not store them in an over hot environment as you may have fitment issues down the road.
    i gotta try the optex. it has so many attractive qualities. dtm, high build, straight to paint...crazy.
    b marler

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i gotta try the optex. it has so many attractive qualities. dtm, high build, straight to paint...crazy.
    Yes bmarler you do need to try it! After shooting over a case of the Optex 4:1 I've learn to do a very quick surface break with a DA using 120g disc on an inner face pad, which would be a long board equivalent of 220 (paper equivalency info is for OP as I know you already get this) as the initial cut sands like concrete. After a quick DA hit to just break the surface I go back to long board as usual. I could probably drop down to 120g with a long board for initial cut but I just hate those deeper scratches and it still seemed to struggle for first hit with the block. Mind you this is on panels with clean metal and very little imperfections. For major dent repair or patch panel replacements I stick to my usual (ss fiber filler when appropriate for patch panel replacement) Epoxy primer, standard filler and finish with the Optex or epoxy. I now finally trust the Optex enough where I will take it to 600g wet and go straight to bc/cc or sealer first if I have any indication of ghosting. As you know I'm not a person that is real comfortable with major deviation from my normal but in this case it has proved to be a good move. In my opinion, from experimenting, this is not a product to hit in the green stage, just loads up way to much too fast and the scratches are really deep.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Yes bmarler you do need to try it! After shooting over a case of the Optex 4:1 I've learn to do a very quick surface break with a DA using 120g disc on an inner face pad, which would be a long board equivalent of 220 (paper equivalency info is for OP as I know you already get this) as the initial cut sands like concrete. After a quick DA hit to just break the surface I go back to long board as usual. I could probably drop down to 120g with a long board for initial cut but I just hate those deeper scratches and it still seemed to struggle for first hit with the block. Mind you this is on panels with clean metal and very little imperfections. For major dent repair or patch panel replacements I stick to my usual (ss fiber filler when appropriate for patch panel replacement) Epoxy primer, standard filler and finish with the Optex or epoxy. I now finally trust the Optex enough where I will take it to 600g wet and go straight to bc/cc or sealer first if I have any indication of ghosting. As you know I'm not a person that is real comfortable with major deviation from my normal but in this case it has proved to be a good move. In my opinion, from experimenting, this is not a product to hit in the green stage, just loads up way to much too fast and the scratches are really deep.
    After you apply base and clear then finish the job have you found any shrinkage in the Optex that can show underlying scratches? I'm using it for the first time on an important job and I'm applying it over a 120 grit scratch and don't want it coming back to haunt me.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    After you apply base and clear then finish the job have you found any shrinkage in the Optex that can show underlying scratches? I'm using it for the first time on an important job and I'm applying it over a 120 grit scratch and don't want it coming back to haunt me.
    If your applying the Optex over 120g scratch bc/cc you are good to go. Just so you know I have never applied less than 2 coats with a 2.2 (not piled on) and on a few occasions 3 coats where I needed a little more build up along sail panels. I have kept a really close eye on these completed projects for fear of shrink back as this is still "somewhat" new too me. I have kept up and gone over these projects in both direct sunlight and in the booth with my Sun gun several months post paint, not even a trace of a scratch nor any metallic settled lines. I have yet to shoot Single stage over it

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    If your applying the Optex over 120g scratch bc/cc you are good to go. Just so you know I have never applied less than 2 coats with a 2.2 (not piled on) and on a few occasions 3 coats where I needed a little more build up along sail panels. I have kept a really close eye on these completed projects for fear of shrink back as this is still "somewhat" new too me. I have kept up and gone over these projects in both direct sunlight and in the booth with my Sun gun several months post paint, not even a trace of a scratch nor any metallic settled lines. I have yet to shoot Single stage over it
    That makes me feel better. Thanks

    I have about 4 coats on it with a 2.2 and I'm leaving it for 24 hours at 70 degrees before block sanding.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    That makes me feel better. Thanks

    I have about 4 coats on it with a 2.2 and I'm leaving it for 24 hours at 70 degrees before block sanding.
    I'm thinking you are either shooting a high end build and blocking for dead straight body lines or shooting a gloss black or maybe both? You are going to love the results after the block out, wow that is first class work Len.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    I'm thinking you are either shooting a high end build and blocking for dead straight body lines or shooting a gloss black or maybe both? You are going to love the results after the block out, wow that is first class work Len.
    I'm doing some repairs on a real nice Saab for a friend and I was going to use Slick Sand but decided to give the Optex a try. The repair was a pretty severe crease on the door and quarter. We'll sand the Optex tomorrow.

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