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Thread: Dolpin Glaze on interior panels?

  1. #1
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    May 2007
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    Default Dolpin Glaze on interior panels?

    Hi all,

    I'm about to start restoring my interior panels on my 1970 Dodge Challenger. They are sun faded, scratched, and chualky. The chalky parts will need sanded down to viable plastic.

    Upon reading some tips on how to restore these (especially on how to add the texture back) I have learned plenty and am ready to give it a try. My question is that I'm bound to encounter some areas on the panel that need some minor filling to help level out the surface. Instead of using the parts counter white "interior filler" stuff, I was wondering how about using some of my Dolphin glaze instead? This would be to fill scratches/gouges or to level minor imperfections from sun damage. The reason I am considering dolphin glaze is because it sets smooth, easily sandable, and seems like a perfect candidate for leveling out minor areas in on a plastic panel.

    I have regular body filler as well, but I don't think there's anything deep enough to consider anything like that. I do know that fiberglass filler is available as well.

    Open to some options here!

    Edit: Upon thinking about this more, I may have answered my own question. Probably would be good to get some "bumper" filler.

  2. #2
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    Your edit is correct. Get a can of Poly Flex and youíre good to go. The plastic parts may flex over the years from lots of different reasons, like bumping into a hard object you just put on the seat and it sticks into the door opening, just to name one. I put Bulldog Adhesion Promoter on sanded plastic before the Poly Flex unless there are scratches for the filler to bond to.

    Bob K

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    Your edit is correct. Get a can of Poly Flex and youíre good to go. The plastic parts may flex over the years from lots of different reasons, like bumping into a hard object you just put on the seat and it sticks into the door opening, just to name one. I put Bulldog Adhesion Promoter on sanded plastic before the Poly Flex unless there are scratches for the filler to bond to.

    Bob K
    Perfect. Funny you mentioned Bulldog as I just bought some of that per what I've been reading.

    It seems like the thought is to put adhesion promotor before any material, even the texture spray, and even the top-coat spray. Sounds like same goes for the filler, even if there was scratches wouldn't hurt, right?

    I'll grab some poly flex, thank you for that.

  4. #4
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    Another question:

    I think I'm going to need the sprayable type since I have large interior panels that the chalking will need to be sanded off. Applying filler by hand will be a nightmare. The good news is I was able to find shinny plastic underneath in all areas using a guitar pic, but most of the panels will need to be sanded clean. I can feel the "divots" that I created by my finger, so I'm thinking filler primer will be needed here.

    Is there something equivalent in sprayable form that will work for me? I just want to make sure to keep the mil thickness up to where it is nearest to stock thickness after sanding.

    I have a devilbliss finishline 3...from Len (if he remembers me). I have a 1.8mm tip. I have not sprayed filler primer yet through it. Assuming I might need a slighter larger tip? What do you guys recommend for spraying plastic on plastic that can be flexible in filler form?

    I do have Omni MP282....

    thanks! I plan to use bulldog either way, before everything that gets applied.
    Last edited by Nate; 10-21-2020 at 11:33 PM.

  5. #5
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    Here's a panel in question. I took a guitar pick and got down to shiny plastic with little effort. But the whole panel will need to be sanded down in order to get to here, not just "sections".

    I did not measure thickness, but I can feel the divot I created with my finger tip.

    My question is once I sand all this off, I will want to definitely spray something to build most of it back up. I will also be spraying some texture on top, as well as dying it which will add some thickness back by itself.

    Question is, once I get done sanding all the deteriorated plastic off, the original plan was that I wasn't going to be sanding much, and that putty-form filler would do the trick. However, I think the whole panels need to be sanded down and we need a sprayable solution here.

    122221449_1309330726083616_4264234022001569191_n.jpg122252638_3320480421332625_2326626520905453362_n.jpg

    These panels are much too large to be slapping putty on. Is there something sprayable that would work?

    These panels are pretty stiff as they are lots of bends and curves. I'm almost thinking 3-4 coats of MP282 would probably do me just fine. They are not large flat panels that will sit around flexing. But I want to do it right because I'm about to put a lot of effort into it.

  6. #6
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    I donít think you should sand the panels down, not if you want to have that same texture when youíre done. Itís hard to remake. If you want to do some art work with carving tools you may be able to teach yourself to match the surrounding area of a small repair but keep the size small. As far as repairing the panels Iíd just wash them down with Dawn and SEM Plastic Prep and spray them with SEM interior panel paint. Itís almost like dye and wonít build up much thickness. You need to do many coats if you want to change the color. Practice on some scrap or a panel from a discarded door of a modern car. I donít know if you can find replacements for your car very easily so keeping what you have is quite important if you want to have the original look.

    Bob K

  7. #7
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    Hey Bob: No worries, I'd like to proceed with my current method since I've seen the outcomes.

    I can find replacement panels on these easily, but they'll still need to be painted. So there is no loss here with what I'm trying to do.

    I think sanding them down is a good idea to get back to solid plastic. Don't worry about the texture--I'm trying a method that will get me close to how it was.

    What I just need clarification on, is what can I use to build a few mils back on the panel? Would MP282 be sufficient for doing that?

  8. #8
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    I use it and like it but I haven't used it on plastic. Put 10% M193 Flex Additive in it after thinner and hardner are mixed in and try it out. You may want to wet sand it after it’s cured. Flex often makes it a little sticky so it can plug up dry paper.

    Bob K

  9. #9
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    Thanks!

    I reached out to PPG and asked them since they don't list plastic as a substrate in the data sheet.

    Definitely yes on the flex agent for sure. I'm wondering if I want to thin it a little with reducer. I may use a 1/2 part at the most.

    I'll report back on what PPG says.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate View Post
    Thanks!

    I reached out to PPG and asked them since they don't list plastic as a substrate in the data sheet.

    Definitely yes on the flex agent for sure. I'm wondering if I want to thin it a little with reducer. I may use a 1/2 part at the most.

    I'll report back on what PPG says.
    Mix the paint as directed using paint, hardener and reducer THEN mix in about 10% flex additive. Flex slows the drying so don't over do it.

  11. #11

    Default

    I have to do something similar. Did you make a copy of the pattern with something, maybe just some filler that you can lift off the surface, then press that onto your repair so it keeps the pattern?

  12. #12
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    90% of my panel's texture had to come off due to disintegrated plastic. The plastic is in great shape now and is solid. I only took off .3 millimeters. Lots and lots of sanding with 180 grit.

    So retexturing from scratch is necessary if your panels are significantly chalking. Today I was playing around with my NAPA texture spray and I think I got something very close.

    Still waiting on PPG to determine if MP282 can be used, but I definitely need to put on 3 reduced coats so that I can sand with 320 grit to move onto the texturing.

    IMG_8032.jpg122844622_374237503720820_1053454296806482705_n.jpg122753202_348850136193169_9180510877860868821_n.jpg

    The texture sample in the picture is me knocking it down with 320 grit (should have waited over night after it shrink completely before knocking it down). I also put a light coat of satin black on it which is going to cause it to loose some "sharpness". In reality, I will be using more of a dye.

    Pretty confident that my process and my repair should turn out extremely well. Just need to figure out what primer to use. To me, that texture is close enough. You'll never be able to mimic the OE texture exactly.

  13. #13
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    A long time ago I had a business partner that left the auto body business and got into repairing auto interiors, he had a method of copying the texture of a material and putting in on an area that he repaired. I never learned his method but he used it a lot on used car lots where he as hired to do this work. So methods do exist but I don't know what they are.

    To clarify, I believe he did this type of repair on smaller areas not on complete panels. If you're interested in this you may want to do some searching on YouTube or Google to see if info is available.

  14. #14
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    Incase PPG doesn't get back to me.....

    I'm thinking 2-3 reduced coats of MP282 w/ flex additive + adhesive promotor is probably just damned fine for what I need to do on a semi-rigid panel...

    Ordered a roll of 320 to hit that with....will use guide coat. From there, I should have a perfect base for texturing + dying.

    Len, you are correct: There are methods that blend in small repair areas on panels. One method is the "stamp" method. You use hot glue an rubber pad and you use it on solid textured space that has solvent to allow the glue to not stick. That glue chunk will imprint the texture and you can use that to "stamp" the repair areas in either the paint or filler.

    The other method is using a small roller with vinyl grain sheets to create the grain on the top coat.

    Both of those methods require extremely high skill ingenuity, and are not appropriate for large panel repairs. Large panel repairs requires spraying texture--there's no other way around it.

  15. #15
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    I just got off the phone with PPG, and they recommended to use Epoxy primer. Interesting. They said that it should cover the 180 grit scratches.

    Data sheet actually says to reduce it for plastic parts. Will do that.

    The only thing that sucks about Epoxy primer is that it isn't great at sanding. Perhaps there really isn't a need to sand the Epoxy w/ 320 once it's sprayed and to go right into texturing.

    This would for sure simplify the process. She said no flex agent is needed for epoxy.

    Here's a picture of a seatback that I just finished sanding. Notice that the lower section is solid plastic and didn't needed to be sanded (still needs to be cleaned). I suppose just using good spray techniques to unify the thickness will be what I will do. Looks like the data sheet says 1 wet coat max is all you get for a flexible coating, so I'm thinking what I will do is only shoot the sections I sanded. Then rely on the texture spray to unify the surface heights, as well as creating a uniform texture on both smooth and OEM textured areas (which I'm sure it will do). Basically, I'm going to be relying more on the texture spray by listening to PPG.

    The thickness difference between a sanded area vs an un-sanded area is .2-.3mm.

    Probably overthinking it, but I think I'm set. This process will be easier/faster/less materials than what I was planning on doing. "knocking down" the texture is basically my only chance to make sure the repair has surface height uniformity.

    122474084_350532706049221_2379834489665399378_n.jpg
    Last edited by Nate; 10-26-2020 at 02:35 PM.

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