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Thread: Old paint spray guns

  1. #1
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    Default Old paint spray guns

    I inherited several spray guns from my late father.

    Haven't been able to find out a whole lot about them.

    Are any of these worth holding onto for auto finishing? Maybe for spraying primer only?

    Sharpe 971 with a #10 tip
    Craftsman, maybe a 254 with a #3 stamping on tip
    Binks 62 with HS99 marked on tip
    Speedy 107a with unmarked tip
    Sears 088 with a 506 tip

    I haven't sprayed in years. Expect anything I do going forward would be urethane BC/CC or single stage urethane. I might try some waterborne in the future but probably stick to solvent-based in the near term because that's what I'm used to and I don't want to change up too many things after so many years.

  2. #2
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    I'm only familiar with the Binks 62 but I don't remember if it was any good. Are any of them gravity feed or are they all suction feed with the cup on the bottom?

  3. #3
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    Keep the Binks model 62 (great primer gun) and keep the Sharp for primer or even basecoat in a pinch.

    Off the rest of the guns.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    I'm only familiar with the Binks 62 but I don't remember if it was any good. Are any of them gravity feed or are they all suction feed with the cup on the bottom?
    All suction feed with the cup on the bottom.

    The Binks and Sharpe seem to be in the best condition, especially the Sharpe, but apparently they're so old there's no info about them on the web.

    I think someone here in the archives mentioned using a Binks 62 for laying down primer. I'm sure none are HVLP.

    I know Dad put down some beautiful paint with at least one of them, but it would have been lacquer or maybe enamel. I don't think he ever played around with the urethanes. Last time I recall him painting was around 1983.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisser View Post
    All suction feed with the cup on the bottom.

    The Binks and Sharpe seem to be in the best condition, especially the Sharpe, but apparently they're so old there's no info about them on the web.

    I think someone here in the archives mentioned using a Binks 62 for laying down primer. I'm sure none are HVLP.

    I know Dad put down some beautiful paint with at least one of them, but it would have been lacquer or maybe enamel. I don't think he ever played around with the urethanes. Last time I recall him painting was around 1983.
    My recommendation would be to sell them online and buy a "good" gun. If they're all suction, non-HVLP guns you'll go through a lot of paint and get mediocre results. The modern guns are a lot better using less material especially when using a good gravity gun.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Len. Been drooling in your store at some of the modern guns.

  7. #7
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    I have a Binks Model 62 that I bought used in 1973 for $8. I still have it and still use it for primer once in a while. That gun will lay down primer glass smooth and the real life difference between using more material is negligible when you factor in the whole primer experience. (most of it ends up on the floor from sanding anyway.)

    I have always thought an HVLP primer gun is a waste of money. But that's just my opinion.

    All the guns you have listed are very poorly suited for spraying urethane clearcoats. You will definitely need a newer gun designed to spray urethane clear and single stage paints.

    Have to say that a well experienced pro painter could lay down a nice urethane clearcoat with that old Sharpe gun. (THAT old Sharpe gun, not other non hvlp Sharpe models)

    A well experienced painter can spray excellent clear coats with just about any gun that meets universal basic criteria. After that it's 98% the painter and 2% the spray gun. Point being a well experienced painter can make a spray gun do what he wants it to do. On the other hand a no or little experienced painter in many cases can't make a brand new $1,000 Sata do what he wants it to do. Again - most of it is the painter and not near as much the gun. No substitute for experience.

  8. #8
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    Thanks Phil.

  9. #9

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    Suction feed was they it was done before the HVLP guns came around. HVLP has advantages over the suction feed such as less overspray(waste of material) due to more pressure needed to pull the pain out of the cup. That's why they are not used today(by most people). Great results can be had with both but that's up to ones decision weighing the advantages vs the disadvantages.

  10. #10
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    i keep an old sharpe siphon feed gun for certain projects. i can't remember what model is is right now, but it takes these color coded air caps depending on what you're spraying. i took the cup off it and attached a 2 quart pressure pot for when i do big stuff. i does require fairly high pressure to atomize properly, but it lays paint very smooth. my biggest issue with those old sharpe guns is how many parts they break down into. the seals wear out and are hard to find. i can't seem to part with my old binks #7 either. sentimental i guess.
    i love how my newer guns have zero seals. i also love the way new guns atomize so well. if you're going to do much painting a new gun should be on your purchase list.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    What Phil V said in the last paragraph. That is pretty much the answer as I see it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonG View Post
    What Phil V said in the last paragraph. That is pretty much the answer as I see it.
    The problem is that a low cost gun that doesn't atomize properly or has an uneven pattern will give you a poor finish no matter how much skill you have.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    The problem is that a low cost gun that doesn't atomize properly or has an uneven pattern will give you a poor finish no matter how much skill you have.
    My previous post stated --

    "A well experienced painter can spray excellent clear coats with just about any gun ------ that meets universal basic criteria -------.

    Another piece of information is -- Pro painters tune their skills TO THE GUN as well as tuning the gun to their needs.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    My previous post stated --

    "A well experienced painter can spray excellent clear coats with just about any gun ------ that meets universal basic criteria -------.

    Another piece of information is -- Pro painters tune their skills TO THE GUN as well as tuning the gun to their needs.
    Phil like you I've been spraying paint a long time using a hundred different guns and I get a much better result using a "good" gun than I do using a cheap gun. It's particularly obvious when spraying metallic colors and clears. The first time I sprayed with a top-of-the-line Sagola it became real apparent to me what difference a good gun can make and I had been spraying with guns that cost twice as much. At that time the 4400 was Sagola's top of the line gun and now the 4600 is even better. If lower cost guns could produce similar results they would sweep the market.

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