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Thread: First time body filling, tips to what I should use? (Pics included)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
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    4

    Default First time body filling, tips to what I should use? (Pics included)

    Hey everyone. My name is Nick. I am currently doing a restoration on a very unique car. I will first start off by saying I am very mechanically inclined, however the complete opposite for body work. I have never painted before other than spray paint and I have never used body filler. Now I realize in some of my pictures some of you will tell me I need to cut and weld new panels in. Unfortunately we are way over budget for this project and are looking to narrow down the budget at this point. Finding parts for this van are near impossible so nearly all of my body/paint work budget has been eaten up by finding parts. I was going to have a professional paint/fill/fix the body but the quotes Iím getting are way out of my budget. Let me start off by saying no, this will not be a show car. This will be just used for parades or casual drives. My first question is am I safe to use a sort of bondo for the bigger holes? If so which one? I was going to buy evercoat rage ultra to do majority of the fixing but now Iím reading to use the ďmetalĒ bondo and then use the rage ultra over that? I believe Iím supposed to use little filler as possible so I am not sure on what to do. After I get it filled I will have another section in the painting area! I appreciate everyone putting up with my beginner questions and Iím hoping to learn along the way. Thank you in advanced for your expertise!

    Nick 35F9D03D-F20A-471A-B7AF-102AF279C504.jpgFF72288B-036A-4F81-8879-AD3263C32B10.jpgC721A34B-5B66-4036-A919-6A070491D8D2.jpgCFEC0C6B-F3E9-459D-8538-11619BEDBDD5.jpg3585B6B9-7F67-4D60-988D-1C9C860DDBFF.jpg

  2. #2
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    Sep 2020
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    Default

    5486F764-06A4-48EC-952E-214E955C9162.jpg

    One last picture that wouldnít fit in the original post

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    308

    Default Oh My

    Not sure what you are working on but you are wasting your time filling in the rust holes,will come back in short time and now you have time and materials down the drain. Maybe do just a rat rod look to the body and save up then do it right later.I know not want you want to hear.Keep us posted.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Default

    completely agree with tommieb. you have to fully remove the rust or it will just start bubbling the paint in a few months. in order to save money, maybe just look into having someone replace the rusty metal and then do the filler/paint yourself. or, you say you're mechanically inclined, do you weld? if so, it's not too difficult to weld in patches. or even panel bond new metal in. it looks like the only tricky parts might be that dogleg by the door opening. there must be another car or truck that has a similar enough shape to scavenge a patch panel out of. with a little hammer work you could make it work. heck, maybe just try getting a piece of flat and start hammering the shape into it. you might be surprised at what you can do.
    keep in mind though, it's one mistake beginners make often, is to try to keep the patch too small. be sure to extend out far enough to completely get rid of the rusted area, and try to place the welds in an area you can easily do the finish/filler work.
    b marler

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    45,320

    Default

    Using body filler to fill open holes usually won't last but a week or two before it starts to crack or fail but there are quick and cheap ways to have it last longer.

    1. Grind around the area to be filled then tap the hole down to countersink it then apply foil tape within the countersunk area then fill the low spot using fiberglass filler. Look for a more complete explanation HERE.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
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    24

    Default Similar situation

    I have a similar situation I'm working on. Not a show car but one that will be in local shows, parades, and weekend driver. I have a couple areas that need patching. Left rear qtr panel and some small areas on floor pans. I have cut out the rust areas and plan to panel bond patches in. For the rear qtr panel I've cut a patch that will be panel bonded on the inside. Once panel bond has set I'll grind outer area smooth and then fill. Looking at what I have set up in rear qtr panel are do you think it will be ok??
    F17ABFD4-E075-4109-A536-9569DF4D12DC.jpg
    1100FD68-58A7-4F1B-B5A6-7D45748A19DE.jpg

  7. #7
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    Nov 2013
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    I have a similar situation I'm working on. Not a show car but one that will be in local shows, parades, and weekend driver. I have a couple areas that need patching. Left rear qtr panel and some small areas on floor pans. I have cut out the rust areas and plan to panel bond patches in. For the rear qtr panel I've cut a patch that will be panel bonded on the inside. Once panel bond has set I'll grind outer area smooth and then fill. Looking at what I have set up in rear qtr panel are do you think it will be ok??
    it's probably ok as long as you can properly prep the inside of the quarter panel.
    b marler

  8. #8
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    Nov 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    it's probably ok as long as you can properly prep the inside of the quarter panel.
    Yep...I'll grind inside down to bare metal so panel bond has a good surface to adhere to.
    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    Kemptville, Ontario
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    Default

    Others here have way more experience than me but for my two cents. Putting 2 layers of metal together like that will cause a ghost line. Better off butting things together and welding them. If I am wrong others will be here shortly to correct me. I'm a newbie as well.
    Building my dream one piece at a time.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marten View Post
    Others here have way more experience than me but for my two cents. Putting 2 layers of metal together like that will cause a ghost line. Better off butting things together and welding them. If I am wrong others will be here shortly to correct me. I'm a newbie as well.
    you are absolutely correct. it can create a ghost line. but considering the location of the repair, and i'm thinking the op possibly doesn't have a welder available, the panel adhesive is a reasonable choice.
    ghost lines are mostly a problem on panels that are higher up on the body, when the sun shines and heats up the panel. down there at the lower portion of the quarter it's not as noticeable.
    if it were a show car or concourse restoration my response would be different.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    Nov 2020
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    you are absolutely correct. it can create a ghost line. but considering the location of the repair, and i'm thinking the op possibly doesn't have a welder available, the panel adhesive is a reasonable choice.
    ghost lines are mostly a problem on panels that are higher up on the body, when the sun shines and heats up the panel. down there at the lower portion of the quarter it's not as noticeable.
    if it were a show car or concourse restoration my response would be different.
    What I just learned from another site, and I will probably use, is the punch and flange tool. Instead of adhering the patch on the inside I'll create a flange area on the main panel, cut the patch to sit inside the flanged area and use panel adhesive to adhere. This will decrease the amount of filler needed. Does that sound like a better approach??

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    What I just learned from another site, and I will probably use, is the punch and flange tool. Instead of adhering the patch on the inside I'll create a flange area on the main panel, cut the patch to sit inside the flanged area and use panel adhesive to adhere. This will decrease the amount of filler needed. Does that sound like a better approach??
    absolutely. a flanged edge will definitely reduce the thickness of the filler. the less filler the better. i'm assuming you have a plan for clamping the patch in position? you want to avoid having any holes to fill.
    b marler

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    45,320

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    Quote Originally Posted by mellis18 View Post
    What I just learned from another site, and I will probably use, is the punch and flange tool. Instead of adhering the patch on the inside I'll create a flange area on the main panel, cut the patch to sit inside the flanged area and use panel adhesive to adhere. This will decrease the amount of filler needed. Does that sound like a better approach??
    You could have learned that method from this site also..... LINK


  14. #14
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    Nov 2020
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    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    absolutely. a flanged edge will definitely reduce the thickness of the filler. the less filler the better. i'm assuming you have a plan for clamping the patch in position? you want to avoid having any holes to fill.
    I have the stitch weld magnets from Eastwood that will provide the clamping.

  15. #15
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    Nov 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    You could have learned that method from this site also..... LINK

    Probably...

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