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Thread: So I'm try to get this body line straight.......

  1. #1
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    Default So I'm try to get this body line straight.......

    I eventually sprayed it with DPLF to get it all one color because I just couldn't make out the line (and I needed to cover the rest of the bare metal). With guide coat graphite, I was able to get it pretty decent but there are a couple low spots and one high spot. There are 3 body lines on this quarter. All of the issues are between the top and bottom line so I would like to skim or spray that area with filler without going above the top line or below the bottom line, then block the middle line straight with tape as a guide.

    My questions:
    What to use for filler? I have Slick Sand, Evercoat Rage Extreme, Evercoat Spot Lite, and K36 primer(its probably 10 years old but unopened). There are 3 areas where bare metal shows through. The largest is the size of a 50 cent coin. I do not want to spray more epoxy until the seal coat.

    What is the best tape to use? It seems the cheap blue or green painter's tape doesn't hold up to the sanding block hitting it a few times.

    Thanks!

    IMG_6372.jpg

  2. #2
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    Default

    Use any kind of tape. The tape isn't an armor plate. It’s there to show you where to stop sanding. If you hit the tape with the sanding block you already sanded over the body line and started the process of damaging it. It’s up to you to control the block so it doesn’t hit the tape. It’s just there for you to see. Not hit. The block should follow the slope of the part of the panel on the side of the tape you are sanding on and glide into space as you cross the tape without touching the tape. Don’t rock over the line and touch the panel on the tape side. That cuts into the fragile body line.

    Bob K
    Last edited by Bob K; 04-07-2020 at 02:11 AM. Reason: spelling

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MT99 View Post
    I eventually sprayed it with DPLF to get it all one color because I just couldn't make out the line (and I needed to cover the rest of the bare metal). With guide coat graphite, I was able to get it pretty decent but there are a couple low spots and one high spot. There are 3 body lines on this quarter. All of the issues are between the top and bottom line so I would like to skim or spray that area with filler without going above the top line or below the bottom line, then block the middle line straight with tape as a guide.

    My questions:
    What to use for filler? I have Slick Sand, Evercoat Rage Extreme, Evercoat Spot Lite, and K36 primer(its probably 10 years old but unopened). There are 3 areas where bare metal shows through. The largest is the size of a 50 cent coin. I do not want to spray more epoxy until the seal coat.

    What is the best tape to use? It seems the cheap blue or green painter's tape doesn't hold up to the sanding block hitting it a few times.

    Thanks!

    IMG_6372.jpg
    If you have a low spot at one side of a body line then you are going to have a low spot on the other side that same body line (in just about all cases).

    I have neved used tape to get a body line right. Your eyes and guidecoat will tell you if the line is right or needs more work.

    How deep are the low spots ? That will dictate what filling method you need to use. If the low spots are like 1/8 of an inch then you need to use a polyester spot putty to fill in that/those low spots. If it's like a 1/16" then high fill urethane primer will work fine.

    What grit of paper are you using on the long board sander you're sanding with ? When guide coat block sanding primer to get the panel straight I use either 180 grit or 220 grit on a longboard (either by hand or with a Hutchins orbital air long board sander). A mistake a lot of lesser experienced bodymen use too fine a grit of sandpaper when block sanding. It goes much fast and easier if you use the correct grit of paper (not too fine a grit).

    Is that a "Twister Duster" ? I'm getting old, I remember those cars when they were new.

  4. #4
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    Northern MN
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    Use any kind of tape. The tape isn't an armor plate. Itís there to show you where to stop sanding. If you hit the tape with the sanding block you already sanded over the body line and started the process of damaging it. Itís up to you to control the block so it doesnít hit the tape. Itís just there for you to see. Not hit. The block should follow the slope of the part of the panel on the side of the tape you are sanding on and glide into space as you cross the tape without touching the tape. Donít rock over the line and touch the panel on the tape side. That cuts into the fragile body line.

    Bob K
    So the tape should be a little ways away from the peak of the line, maybe 1/16"? Otherwise it would impossible to glide into space on the other side of the line without hitting the tape.

  5. #5
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    Sure, that sounds good. I use tape to make me remember where the line is because I donít do this very often. Itís easy to get sort of hypnotised while sanding and watching the guide coat disappear then you lose track of a faint body line and wipe part of it out. Thatís only a problem when you are sculpting the body line out of filler.

    Bob K

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    If you have a low spot at one side of a body line then you are going to have a low spot on the other side that same body line (in just about all cases).

    I have neved used tape to get a body line right. Your eyes and guidecoat will tell you if the line is right or needs more work.

    How deep are the low spots ? That will dictate what filling method you need to use. If the low spots are like 1/8 of an inch then you need to use a polyester spot putty to fill in that/those low spots. If it's like a 1/16" then high fill urethane primer will work fine.

    What grit of paper are you using on the long board sander you're sanding with ? When guide coat block sanding primer to get the panel straight I use either 180 grit or 220 grit on a longboard (either by hand or with a Hutchins orbital air long board sander). A mistake a lot of lesser experienced bodymen use too fine a grit of sandpaper when block sanding. It goes much fast and easier if you use the correct grit of paper (not too fine a grit).

    Is that a "Twister Duster" ? I'm getting old, I remember those cars when they were new.
    The low spots are subtle, maybe 1/32" at most. I tried eyeballing it but it is just not good enough. It is a really long line. I use 120 or 220 to get the right shape. I might use 320 to move the guide coat without removing filler. I agree completely about using too fine grit.

    According to the Slick Sand P sheet, I would need to cover the bare spots with epoxy first. I would like to avoid getting more epoxy right now. Is Rage Extreme or Spot-Lite suitable for skimming a large area?

    The car is a 340 Demon
    Thanks for the replies!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MT99 View Post
    The low spots are subtle, maybe 1/32" at most. I tried eyeballing it but it is just not good enough. It is a really long line. I use 120 or 220 to get the right shape. I might use 320 to move the guide coat without removing filler. I agree completely about using too fine grit.

    According to the Slick Sand P sheet, I would need to cover the bare spots with epoxy first. I would like to avoid getting more epoxy right now. Is Rage Extreme or Spot-Lite suitable for skimming a large area?

    The car is a 340 Demon
    Thanks for the replies!
    I don't use tape that often on body lines but when I do it is to bring the body line crisp. As phil stated if you have a low on the body line it's almost always low on the other side. I run my tape almost right on the line, maybe .030 back at most, and sand that side only without rolling over the edge. After one side of the line is complete I swap and do the opposite side in the same manner with tape. After all lines are complete and sanded to the point of ready for epoxy or sealer I knock the crown off with 600-800g with a soft sander. It's time consuming but makes for laser straight lines. I would stick with a long board like you stated and the grits you mentioned.
    For a minor low you could use either the Rage Extreme or an icing product. For my personal experience I would cover the bare metal with epoxy primer, after all this work would you want the chance of a failure? I believe the P sheets for both SS and Feather Fill state a 1" diameter of bare metal is okay, I prefer the insurance of epoxy. Check out the Preval sprayers that are available from jobbers and most auto part stores, they work great if you only have a few small spots, around an inch or two in diameter, where you want the metal protected without going through the normal spray process. If you go this route you will need to over reduce your epoxy.
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  8. #8
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    Jan 2006
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    Default Another idea

    Guide coat is your friend in a contrasting color

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default

    body lines, well, get 'em with 40, 80 and 120 grit amd body filler at first..

    primer is just for "micro correction" ....

    and yes, use tape and guide coat...it works, it is smart and fast..

  10. #10
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    Jun 2008
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    Northern MN
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    Default

    The area between the door jamb and wheel well is slightly concave. Very tricky to block. Now I see why so many of these Dusters and Demons are filled in that spot to make it flat or even convex. It's interesting that my NOS quarters have more of a curve on that middle line than the quarters I cut off and some I see online are nearly straight.

  11. #11
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    For concave panels I have a few pieces of vinyl tubing and rubber hose that I use for blocks. (Rubber hose from truck radiator hose)They range from one to three inches in diameter and heavy wall. They are about 4Ē long. I use a stick on sandpaper. You only have a line of contact so the pipe needs to be rotated a little quite often.

    Bob K

  12. #12
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    Dec 2015
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MT99 View Post
    The area between the door jamb and wheel well is slightly concave. Very tricky to block. Now I see why so many of these Dusters and Demons are filled in that spot to make it flat or even convex. It's interesting that my NOS quarters have more of a curve on that middle line than the quarters I cut off and some I see online are nearly straight.
    Not all patch panels are equal in value and grade. Another one of those you get what you pay for. On new panels I always go over them with a contour gauge prior to install. Often times you can make some adjustments on the panel prior to install.
    On concave contours you have to think outside the box in terms of block sanders. I have a multitude of home made blocks that range from hose to round pool noodles (these work great) as well as the round dura blocks and soft sanders.

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