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Thread: Best way to fix slightly pushed in fender?

  1. #1
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    Default Best way to fix slightly pushed in fender?

    Still a novice to metal correction but I've got a front fender with a slight depression over the wheel arch. I'm wondering what the best way to straighten this out is. I will be repainting it off that helps but learning to remove it PDR style would also be good.

    The effected section is probably 8-10". It's a "softly" pushed in depression. No harsh creases or marks. Just above the fender lip where I'm pointing (the wave in the reflection).

    0755E2D1-A1BA-45D2-978A-3C556E44D2ED.jpg

    Here's a video of it:

    https://youtu.be/E8_v-BV80Uo

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWDave View Post
    Still a novice to metal correction but I've got a front fender with a slight depression over the wheel arch. I'm wondering what the best way to straighten this out is. I will be repainting it off that helps but learning to remove it PDR style would also be good.

    The effected section is probably 8-10". It's a "softly" pushed in depression. No harsh creases or marks. Just above the fender lip where I'm pointing (the wave in the reflection).

    0755E2D1-A1BA-45D2-978A-3C556E44D2ED.jpg

    Here's a video of it:

    https://youtu.be/E8_v-BV80Uo
    The video is much more telling than the still picture. I'd probably try to push out as much of the dent as possible then grind and fill in order to make the surface perfect. Finish the filler with some 220+- grit paper then use a filler primer, guide coat and block sanding to finish the leveling.

  3. #3
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    You might be a lot further ahead to just take the fender to a professional PDR guy and have him take the dent out with no need for any grinding, filling, priming and painting. That way also you are guaranteed color matching will be perfect since your not repainting.

    I have 4 PDR pic bars in assorted sizes but nothing like the PDR specialists use to "roll" dents/dings out with. I have watched some PDR specialists and they are amazing at what they can accomplish. A basic set of pro PDR tools are around $2,000.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    The video is much more telling than the still picture. I'd probably try to push out as much of the dent as possible then grind and fill in order to make the surface perfect. Finish the filler with some 220+- grit paper then use a filler primer, guide coat and block sanding to finish the leveling.
    What technique to push it out? Just by hand?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    You might be a lot further ahead to just take the fender to a professional PDR guy and have him take the dent out with no need for any grinding, filling, priming and painting. That way also you are guaranteed color matching will be perfect since your not repainting.

    I have 4 PDR pic bars in assorted sizes but nothing like the PDR specialists use to "roll" dents/dings out with. I have watched some PDR specialists and they are amazing at what they can accomplish. A basic set of pro PDR tools are around $2,000.
    The whole car is getting painted a different color so I'm not worried about matching. Trying to use this car as a learning tool since just about every panel needs work and I don't have the money to have it off.

  6. #6
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    Would the whole rapid heat / rapid cooling trick work to shrink the metal back to form here? I've seen videos of people going from heat gun to inverted compressed air (nitrogen?) to get non creased depressions to pop back out.

  7. #7
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    Playing around with the fender is a good idea if you are doing it as a learning experience but if it were me and I wanted it done without looking like it was a repair then I would look into buying a new fender. Check the prices on line and at your local body supply store. If that fender comes in at $50 or $60 there is no way Iíd try to save that small sum doing all the work to make it look new. If it were a rear quarter then yes do the repair because changing a quarter is much more work but you have half the work done already by removing that fender.

    Bob K

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
    Playing around with the fender is a good idea if you are doing it as a learning experience but if it were me and I wanted it done without looking like it was a repair then I would look into buying a new fender. Check the prices on line and at your local body supply store. If that fender comes in at $50 or $60 there is no way Iíd try to save that small sum doing all the work to make it look new. If it were a rear quarter then yes do the repair because changing a quarter is much more work but you have half the work done already by removing that fender.

    Bob K
    I understand the logic behind that but I figure learning on an easily removable part will be worth more when I get to the welded on quarter panels that also need attention.

    This is also a '75 BMW 2002 so parts are getting very expensive. An OEM fender is now $650.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWDave View Post
    I understand the logic behind that but I figure learning on an easily removable part will be worth more when I get to the welded on quarter panels that also need attention.

    This is also a '75 BMW 2002 so parts are getting very expensive. An OEM fender is now $650.
    Dave, feel carefully around the dent in the fender and look closely at the fender wheel opening. Either the wheel opening is push in and must be pulled back our or there is a high spot near the top of the dent, it's called a "crown". That dent will not come out until you can figure out what's holding it in.
    Like I said, either the wheel lip is pushed in or there is a high spot at the top of the dent. It's like finding the key to unlock a door, once you do that the dent should come right out and stay out (no tin canning).

  10. #10
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    Sorry, I thought that was from a much newer car. Youíre right, you can do a lot of work for the price of a fender. I donít want to speak for others but just for myself Iíve found itís much easier doing the filler work and sanding with the fender on the car after the metal shaping is done. Lift the car up on jack stands and pull up a chair and work with the damage at a comfortable height. Thatís how I do it now that Iím old. The fender wonít move around on you.

    Bob K

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