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Thread: 2006 Mini Cooper Refresh - My first paint job

  1. #1
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    Jan 2020
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    Default 2006 Mini Cooper Refresh - My first paint job

    Hello everyone.

    I have a question to post later about using different brands of primer, but I want to start out by saying thank you to everyone who posts their questions, experience, and advice on here. Google has been taking me here for a couple years as I have considered re-painting my wifeís Mini Cooper.

    I want to especially say thank you to Len, Henry, and Bob K.

    I havenít welded in 20 years, but thanks to Lensí excellent write-up on his back-strip method I successfully welded in some difficult body parts.

    This will be my first time painting a car or even using a paint sprayer.
    Below are some pictures of the project Iím working on. My wife bought this car brand new in 2005 while it was still on the boat. Itís a 2006, the last of the supercharged. The car had a lot of issues, so I asked her what car she would want if we broke down and got another car loan. She said ďI donít know..., I love my Mini CooperĒ. So, Iím trying to give her a ďNEWĒ Mini-Cooper

    I Bought a parts car and have swapped over a tons of parts, fixing almost all of the little annoying issues the car had developed with age.

    Now Iím on to the bodywork. Because of rust, I replaced the door and hatch.
    I started sanding the ďsurfaceĒ rust underneath the tail lights and found the rust was coming through from the back side. So I cut and replaced with the mint condition ones from the parts car.

    IMG_4437.jpg
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    IMG_4723.jpg



    I hope to have some finished pictures to share in a couple weeks.

    Cheers,
    David

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    Default

    That sure looks good to me. You didnít mention it but I hope you can get some epoxy on the back side of the welds. Even sloshing it back there with a brush just so rust doesnít come back later. I never worry about what it looks like back there so I donít use a gun to do it because itís hard to control the overspray.

    Bob K

  5. #5
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    Thanks Bob!

    I used my hands to slather and goop seam sealer in every place I could reach with my fingers. I think I was able to cover and seal all the welded areas, but there were corners of original seams I could no get my hands on.

    I am purchasing Epoxy Primer, and I have been trying to come up with a way to get it back there into the corners.
    I have a mini HVLP, I might be able to get back there...

    Any ideas on how to deliver paint via tubing to get way back into the crevices?

  6. #6
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    Nov 2006
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    I havenít used it but I think a product called cavity wax comes in a spray can with a tube so it can be installed in hard to reach spots.

    Bob K

  7. #7
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    Nov 2005
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    41,636

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    Yes, we use and sell cavity wax along with the application tubes and found it works well when used properly.

    One more bit of advice although it looks like it may be a little late. After we do our welding and grind the welds level, our first coat of filler is a fiberglass filler which is more moisture resistant than regular "Bondo-type" fillers. So any moisture that may get through a pin-hole in the weld isn't absorbed by the filler and cause it to blister.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    14,355

    Default Nice work!

    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    Thanks Bob!

    I used my hands to slather and goop seam sealer in every place I could reach with my fingers. I think I was able to cover and seal all the welded areas, but there were corners of original seams I could no get my hands on.

    I am purchasing Epoxy Primer, and I have been trying to come up with a way to get it back there into the corners.
    I have a mini HVLP, I might be able to get back there...

    Any ideas on how to deliver paint via tubing to get way back into the crevices?
    You really turned out a nice job of a messy area. I found a picture of what you probably had (and in red) online. Seems to be a common area for rust/rot. I also read rust to form around the trim piece area of the rear hatch in the marker plate section as well as the bottom of the doors.


    CAVITY WAX: I follow the following guy on YouTube and a couple weeks ago he did a video on this subject:



    Next is something 3M put out about the use of the product:

    https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/...y-wax-plus.mp4

    CAUTION: Although I believe your taillight areas would be perfect for cavity wax, the one thing that haunts me in using this stuff is the MIST getting all over other parts still in need of repair. I would NOT use this wax in a closed shop where it can get all over any parts I might need to do bodywork to or use paint products. I also can't ignore the benefits of ZERO RUST as a protectant such as inside of doors or the like but if you can't get in, you can't. SO, cavity wax seems a good route.

    Lastly, water or moisture allowed to 'puddle' is where dirt & debris will also collect and rust has a foothold. Might be worth taking out a taillight on an occasional basis to see what's going on in there.

    Great to hear from you and see your project pictures. Thanks for that. Keep us posted.

    Henry

  9. #9
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    Jan 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes, we use and sell cavity wax along with the application tubes and found it works well when used properly.

    One more bit of advice although it looks like it may be a little late. After we do our welding and grind the welds level, our first coat of filler is a fiberglass filler which is more moisture resistant than regular "Bondo-type" fillers. So any moisture that may get through a pin-hole in the weld isn't absorbed by the filler and cause it to blister.

    Ah, it is too late. I read a bunch of debates on "primer first or bondo first" . Nobody mentioned the fiberglass filler. That would have been a good choice.

    Is this another reason to go with an Epoxy primer as a first coat instead of a high-build DTM primer? Seems like Epoxy would be more durable against scratches and such.

  10. #10
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    Jan 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes, we use and sell cavity wax along with the application tubes and found it works well when used properly.

    One more bit of advice although it looks like it may be a little late. After we do our welding and grind the welds level, our first coat of filler is a fiberglass filler which is more moisture resistant than regular "Bondo-type" fillers. So any moisture that may get through a pin-hole in the weld isn't absorbed by the filler and cause it to blister.

    I missed the fact that the Cavity Wax came with a tube.
    I ended up using Eastwood Internal Frame Coating.
    I REALLY liked it. The stuff even creeped and came out a couple places around the body, very glad I found it.

    Frame Paint.jpeg

  11. #11
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    Jan 2020
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    Nearing Completion!

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    I made dozens of mistakes and learned so many things the hard way. Thanks to everyone for all their help and sharing of knowlege. I have a dozen questions to ask, I hope to post some of
    them in a week or two when I'm done.

    Just a few things left:
    Painting the trim pieces with SEM Ultra Trim Black.
    Painting the plastic rocker to match the car color.
    Then the arduous task of putting it back together and replacing all the broken plastic pieces...

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