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Thread: Compressor tank rust pin holes

  1. #1
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    Default Compressor tank rust pin holes

    36 years ago I bought a Quincy air compressor QR-25 series Model 325. It has a Baldor true 5 hp with an 80 gallon tank. The air compressor pump has a built in oil pump like a car and a hydraulic unloader. If the oil pump doesn't pump up at least 10 psi of oil pressure the air pump won't pump air. It has been used just about every day in a commercial auto body/paint shop since new and the compressor pump has never had a wrench on it. My point is it has been a fantastic air compressor. By far the best financial investment I ever made. Now for the reason of this post -- About a year ago it developed a couple small pin holes of rust in the bottom of the 80 gallon air tank. I welded a patch over the rust hole with 3/16" steel plate and it worked great until a couple days ago. I turned the compressor on like I have a thousand times but this time it started leaking air from the other end of the air tank (obviously 80 gallon horizontal tank). That was it for me, no more screwing around welding patches to cover rust holes on that tank. I contacted Quincy compressor distributor and parts in Detroit and they said it was going to cost me around $1200 for a new replacement air tank. That's a lot of money but I was ready to pay for the new tank. I thought that now would be a good time to do some research into what else is out there and what's involved in using a generic tank for close to half of what Quincy wanted for their air tank. Obviously Quincy does not make their own air tanks, they buy their air tanks for an air tank manufacturer in Tennessee. I called several places that sell commercial air compressors and parts and I spent at least a half a day on the internet researching my options. I called one place that sells and services Quincy compressors and they told me they had for sale an 80 gallon upright air tank that was manufactured in 2017 and was used for a short time as an added air reservoir for a rotary screw compressor setup. The people quickly realized they needed a bigger rotary screw setup so this 80 gallon air tank was no longer used/needed. It was manufactured by the company that makes Quincy OEM air tanks. I bought the new/used tank for $300 and now I'm in the process of changing everything over and updating everything in the process. I'm rebuilding the cylinder head on the air pump, not because it needs it (it pumped air just fine) but I figured after 36 years it needs a good service/clean up. The only thing I'm replacing in the cylinder head is the gaskets, valve springs etc because everything there is in good shape. I picked up a harbor fright parts washer tank and will use that during disassembly of the valve assemblies. I ordered Quincy Quin-cip full synthetic oil for it. SAE non detergent as my compressor was one of the last ones manufactured without a spin on oil filter. The spin on oil filter ones use a detergent based oil. I also order a new magnetic starter for the 5 hp motor, I noticed the contact in the magnetic starter were getting pretty burned. I'm repainting everything close to the Quincy blue (damn near impossible to buy Quincy blue paint for pre 1995 Quincy compressors). Bought a new rebuild kit for the hydraulic unloader. Now's the time to do the whole setup right then not have to screw around later.

    Len, you haven't had any problem with rust pin holes in your air compressor tank ? I know your air compressor is older than mine. I have to admit i did not drain the water out of the tank religiously (to put it mildly). I remember one time I drained at least 5 gallons of water out of the air tank. I'm going to hook up an electric automatic water drain system on the new air tank. They sell the electric automatic drains for anywhere from $75 to around $150. It will be a lot more efficient draining the water out of an upright tank compared to a horizontal tank.

    I will post pictures of the setup when I'm done.

    In case anyone is wondering - Replacement cost new for a compressor like mine now is $4,000. A lot of money but a great investment that will end up saving you money in the long run if you plan on using a compressor for the rest of your life. I'm 72 years old and I still use mine just about every day. Not to make a living any more but for my own projects.

  2. #2
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    I change my oil and drain the tank about once a year. I installed a valve with a lever at the bottom of the tank and attached a 10' hose so the tank is easy to drain. My compressor is about 50 years old and no leaks yet and is used all day every day and still no problems with the 80 gallon tank.

  3. #3
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    Default WOW

    Phi this is like looking in a mirror. Same compressor and I bought mine in 1992 used it for 2 years then in dry storage for 3 years then in my shop that I have now. One man so not beat and always change oil every 6 months and drain tank every week more in summer. Great compressor.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    Phi this is like looking in a mirror. Same compressor and I bought mine in 1992 used it for 2 years then in dry storage for 3 years then in my shop that I have now. One man so not beat and always change oil every 6 months and drain tank every week more in summer. Great compressor.
    I believe Quincy recommended changing the oil every 2500 hours. I ran a one man shop with my Quincy for most of the 36 years I have owned it. I added up how many days of normal operation it would take for that compressor to run 2500 hours and it's a LONG time. I never change oil in mine nearly as often as you do. But I do agree that more often is better than not often enough. I have used regular 30 wt SAE non detergent oil in it since new but I'm switching now to Quincy brand full synthetic non detergent oil. Been thinking seriously of adding that oil filter plate on the air pump which has to be better than no filter. Today I'm going to remove the inspection plate on the side the air pump and see what 36 years of no oil filter is going to look like on the bottom of the oil sump. I will drain the existing oil and flush out what ever contaminants there are in there. Every time I checked the oil on the dipstick since new it always looks as clean as when I put it in there. I'm sure that to some degree it's a visual misconception.

    I don't very seriously recommend any products often but I can't overstate the value of investment in a Quincy compressor (that has an oil pump). I remember telling my wife before buying the compressor that I could buy a cheaper brand of industrial air compressor that would last me for several years or I could buy a Quincy that would last me for the rest of my life. And the rest is history. It WILL last me the rest of my life. I figure another 35 years (which will put me over a hundred years old and hopefully I'll still have a use for it up to that point.)

  5. #5
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    Thought I would post an update on my Quincy QR-25 Model 325 air compressor. I finished it up tonight, new receiver tank. I did take the cylinder head off and disassembled the valves and the hydraulic unloader. Bought an upper end gasket set with a valve kit (which it did not need the valve kit but I put in anyway. One of the reasons I took the head off was to see how much wear at the pistons and cylinder walls. I was shocked to see NO measurable wear to the pistons and cylinder wall. The cylinders still had very visible cross hatching in them. I bought a rebuild kit for the Hydraulic unloader which again it didn't need after 36 years of being used just about every day since new. While I was at it I figured it was a good time to give the compressor a face lift and I think it came out good. It runs great. Takes a little over 5 minutes to go from zero air pressure to shut off at 155psi which is about what it was when new. I plumbed the air intake through my shop ceiling up into the shop attic for several reasons. No shop dust up there, no paint fumes and its a lot quieter. I can carry on a conversation standing next to the compressor while it's running. I'm posting a picture of the updating of my compressor. I'm 6'1" tall and that compressor is taller than I am. The electric motor weighs close to 120 lbs with the dual belt cast iron pulley. I had to use a one ton shop engine lift and a home made sling to lift the 5 hp Baldor 220v single phase motor up on to the mounting plate on the compressor tank. I used the same engine crane with a chain to lift the air pump on to the tank mounting plate. That compressor weighs close to 650 lbs. It's lasted me 36 years without putting a wrench on it and after the maintenance and a new facelift it should last another 36 years plus, course I'll be 108 years old at that point. Hopefully I will still need it at that point. Probably not a lot of use. LOL !

    I had the white Quincy sticker/logo made for me at a local print and sign shop. It's 18" wide and they charged me $26.00 for it. Nice finishing touch.
    Total cost of the whole project including the new tank was under $500. One last thing -- Even the two fan belts are the original belts that came on it from the factory 36 years ago and they are still good, no sign of cracking etc.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    Looks good! I’ve had “paint my compressor” on my to do list for about 20 years. Maybe seeing yours looking so good will get me going.

    Bob K

  7. #7
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    Default WOW

    Looks new. Nice job Phil Now you can get back to work.............

  8. #8
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    Default Hats off!

    Really nice job, Phil. Not only a top rated machine, but it's enjoyable to look at.

    I once named a German Shephard, "Quincy". The name was easy to come up with.

    Henry

  9. #9
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    Thanks, guys. I appreciate the good words.

  10. #10
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    Good looking machine & that 5HP motor looks huge!

    I have often wondered what the bottom of my tank looks like. Was new in 2002 ish. I drain it a few times a year when I think of it. Got to be getting pretty rusty inside. Its no prize like what you have though

    I like the remote air intake. Do you have a filter system rigged up? Great idea.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 68ragtop View Post
    Good looking machine & that 5HP motor looks huge!

    I have often wondered what the bottom of my tank looks like. Was new in 2002 ish. I drain it a few times a year when I think of it. Got to be getting pretty rusty inside. Its no prize like what you have though

    I like the remote air intake. Do you have a filter system rigged up? Great idea.
    Thanks, 68 ragtop. I do use a factory Quincy filter, just on the other end of the white PVC pipe. I have a metal pipe adapter on the compressor and at the other end of the intake pipe where the filter is that the filter screws on to.

    That compressor looks good now but 3 weeks ago it looked like it had been in use for several decades.

    In the last couple weeks I talked to a Quincy rep and he said that tank should not have rusted out, that if the water is drained on regular intervals there should be enough oil from the compressor pump to stop rust in the bottom of the tank. Personally I think that was horse shit because my compressor used NO oil. The oil level was always the same on the dip stick every time I checked it. I thought about pouring a couple ounces of 30 weight oil into the tank to stop the rust, then I thought it could end up in the air lines and end up with fish eyes in the paint. The last tank took 35 years to develop a rust hole so if the new tank lasts another 35 years then it's all good.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    380

    Default Compressor

    Phil,

    Outstanding job on the compressor. I once owned a horizontal 120 gallon, magnetic starting, Quincy decades ago and have always thought it too be the best compressor ever made. Here is a suggestion that you may or may not need. In my last shop I owned an 80 gallon, true 5 hp vertical compressor that I moved to my existing shop around 6 or 7 years ago. When this compressor was in the old shop I used .250 neoprene isolaters under the tank feet and bolted the compressor to the floor using concrete anchors. When I moved that same compressor to my existing shop I did not bolt it to the floor. In my new shop I had installed a pvc floor tile by Racedeck and thought it would not be necessary to anchor the compressor. Within a year I developed several pin hole leaks where the pump/compressor mounting plate weldment met the tank (see pic). I don't know if the pin holes were due to top heavy vibration, a slack belt or the tanks age being 15 years old. This is just a thought and may not be needed as I have no way to prove why the leaks occurred but it does seem suspicious that the failure occurred at the top of the tank at the weld line. I have since mounted this compressor to the floor after patching the pin holes with my acetylene torch and have not experienced another leak since that time.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Nov 2013
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    olympia,wa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    Thought I would post an update on my Quincy QR-25 Model 325 air compressor. I finished it up tonight, new receiver tank. I did take the cylinder head off and disassembled the valves and the hydraulic unloader. Bought an upper end gasket set with a valve kit (which it did not need the valve kit but I put in anyway. One of the reasons I took the head off was to see how much wear at the pistons and cylinder walls. I was shocked to see NO measurable wear to the pistons and cylinder wall. The cylinders still had very visible cross hatching in them. I bought a rebuild kit for the Hydraulic unloader which again it didn't need after 36 years of being used just about every day since new. While I was at it I figured it was a good time to give the compressor a face lift and I think it came out good. It runs great. Takes a little over 5 minutes to go from zero air pressure to shut off at 155psi which is about what it was when new. I plumbed the air intake through my shop ceiling up into the shop attic for several reasons. No shop dust up there, no paint fumes and its a lot quieter. I can carry on a conversation standing next to the compressor while it's running. I'm posting a picture of the updating of my compressor. I'm 6'1" tall and that compressor is taller than I am. The electric motor weighs close to 120 lbs with the dual belt cast iron pulley. I had to use a one ton shop engine lift and a home made sling to lift the 5 hp Baldor 220v single phase motor up on to the mounting plate on the compressor tank. I used the same engine crane with a chain to lift the air pump on to the tank mounting plate. That compressor weighs close to 650 lbs. It's lasted me 36 years without putting a wrench on it and after the maintenance and a new facelift it should last another 36 years plus, course I'll be 108 years old at that point. Hopefully I will still need it at that point. Probably not a lot of use. LOL !

    I had the white Quincy sticker/logo made for me at a local print and sign shop. It's 18" wide and they charged me $26.00 for it. Nice finishing touch.
    Total cost of the whole project including the new tank was under $500. One last thing -- Even the two fan belts are the original belts that came on it from the factory 36 years ago and they are still good, no sign of cracking etc.
    that looks great. probably better than it looked new. my spare compressor is what looks like the same pump head with a 7.5 hp motor and a horizontal tank. seeing how good yours turned out makes me want to clean mine up too. i don't know if quincy used the same pump and just upsized the motor, but it kind of looks like it. like yours, mine is decades old but still runs great. i also like the remote air inlet. most of us just tend to put the whole compressor out in a shed somewhere so we don't have to listen to it. they tend to get neglected that way, at least mine does. i think i check on it maybe three times a year.
    b marler

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