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Thread: 36 Ford

  1. #1
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    Default 36 Ford

    We just finished this 36 Ford and it came out beautiful. The colors don't show real well, it's maroon and tan and was painted with U-Tech single stage paint.


    We disassembled the car and painted it in pieces and buffed it in pieces then reassembled it.

  2. #2
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    Default

    looks fantastic len, what a great project!
    b marler

  3. #3
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    Default Let's see...

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    We just finished this 36 Ford and it came out beautiful. The colors don't show real well, it's maroon and tan and was painted with U-Tech single stage paint.


    We disassembled the car and painted it in pieces and buffed it in pieces then reassembled it.
    Looking really good. From a period when cars were a bit bigger than today.
    Does that have a stock driveline?

    Thanks for sharing that one.

    Henry

  4. #4
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    Default What a Car

    Very nice job Len. And what a great car.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    Looking really good. From a period when cars were a bit bigger than today.
    Does that have a stock driveline?

    Thanks for sharing that one.

    Henry
    Yes, it has the stock V8 flat head and it runs great.

  6. #6
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    Default Hmmm...

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes, it has the stock V8 flat head and it runs great.
    I keep looking at that car and wonder a couple things.

    First, is that a 'sun roof' of the era?

    Second, is the maroon metallic or non?

    Henry

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry View Post
    I keep looking at that car and wonder a couple things.

    First, is that a 'sun roof' of the era?

    Second, is the maroon metallic or non?

    Henry
    No sun roof just a vinyl section, I have no idea what it's about but it's real hard to mask.

    No metallic just a solid color maroon that worked out great for single stage paint.

  8. #8
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    Default Any Pic's

    Len any more Pic's of the build or resto work? Again Nice Work!

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tommie.b View Post
    Len any more Pic's of the build or resto work? Again Nice Work!
    Here's a few more....
    As you can see there's not a lot of body work, mostly disassembly, painting and reassembly. The owner will be doing a lot more reassembly.

  10. #10
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    Default

    man i love the sound of a flathead ford. owning one is a bucket list item for me.
    b marler

  11. #11
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    Default Help Len

    Len,

    Nice job, looks fantastic and is Similar to a project I am soon to shoot. Maybe you could help with a project I am soon to shoot (36' chevy coupe)?

    You stated "We disassembled the car and painted it in pieces and buffed it in pieces then reassembled it", assuming you were going to shoot this exact same project with a tri coat, what would you have done differently? Leave doors and trunk lid on and walk the length of car, all the while shooting fenders separately? Hood on or off? Cut in and backside for pillars, trunk and doors separately? Thank you Len for any advice you can give.

  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Len,

    Nice job, looks fantastic and is Similar to a project I am soon to shoot. Maybe you could help with a project I am soon to shoot (36' chevy coupe)?

    You stated "We disassembled the car and painted it in pieces and buffed it in pieces then reassembled it", assuming you were going to shoot this exact same project with a tri coat, what would you have done differently? Leave doors and trunk lid on and walk the length of car, all the while shooting fenders separately? Hood on or off? Cut in and backside for pillars, trunk and doors separately? Thank you Len for any advice you can give.
    If I were shooting a metallic or tri-coat color I would shoot all of my adjacent panels together but panels that are mounted perpendicular to the same color I'd shoot separately.

    When panels are at right angles to their mount it can be quite difficult to achieve a consistent finish because the air tends to block the spray from reaching the surface and with multi-stage paint it can cause a difference in color. Even with solid color like my 36 it can cause rough areas so removing the panels works best for painting and usually also works best for buffing. Problems can come in reassembly but with a little help, like another person, you can usually avoid damaging the paint.

  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    If I were shooting a metallic or tri-coat color I would shoot all of my adjacent panels together but panels that are mounted perpendicular to the same color I'd shoot separately.

    When panels are at right angles to their mount it can be quite difficult to achieve a consistent finish because the air tends to block the spray from reaching the surface and with multi-stage paint it can cause a difference in color. Even with solid color like my 36 it can cause rough areas so removing the panels works best for painting and usually also works best for buffing. Problems can come in reassembly but with a little help, like another person, you can usually avoid damaging the paint.
    Len,

    I really appreciate you getting back too me on this as I'm still paranoid on my first "fat fendered" full shoot with tri coat on a 30's vehicle. I specifically mention this era of cars as I've only shot a few panels and a few full car shots with tri coat on the normal classic cars with long straight body lines, but as you know these fat fender cars are not the normal and can be very difficult (i.e. your 36' ford, 41' buick and 40' zephyr, etc.) I'm trying to build my confidence with this 36' chevy tri coat in that I don't off shade the peripherals (fenders, hood and running boards) from the body. This one is for my personal car collection and is meant to be my best work yet after 40+ years of P&B, drive train work, etc. as well as full frame off restorations. I have literally over 1k hours just in custom SM work.
    I have done hundreds of the 30's models over the years in single and 2 stage products and understand how to protect panels for assembly very well, tape and poster board being cheap compared to a chip in paint.
    So, with that in mind I'm thinking about shooting the interior window moldings, both upper and lower custom dashes I built as well as underside fenders, underside of 4 part hood and maybe the inside pillar jambs utilizing just the bc and cc with all the outside SM being tri coat. Your thoughts and suggestions on this route?

  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Len,

    I really appreciate you getting back too me on this as I'm still paranoid on my first "fat fendered" full shoot with tri coat on a 30's vehicle. I specifically mention this era of cars as I've only shot a few panels and a few full car shots with tri coat on the normal classic cars with long straight body lines, but as you know these fat fender cars are not the normal and can be very difficult (i.e. your 36' ford, 41' buick and 40' zephyr, etc.) I'm trying to build my confidence with this 36' chevy tri coat in that I don't off shade the peripherals (fenders, hood and running boards) from the body. This one is for my personal car collection and is meant to be my best work yet after 40+ years of P&B, drive train work, etc. as well as full frame off restorations. I have literally over 1k hours just in custom SM work.
    I have done hundreds of the 30's models over the years in single and 2 stage products and understand how to protect panels for assembly very well, tape and poster board being cheap compared to a chip in paint.
    So, with that in mind I'm thinking about shooting the interior window moldings, both upper and lower custom dashes I built as well as underside fenders, underside of 4 part hood and maybe the inside pillar jambs utilizing just the bc and cc with all the outside SM being tri coat. Your thoughts and suggestions on this route?
    Yes shooting the undersides etc. using a different color would work fine. We normally shoot the undersides of the fenders etc with black Zero Rust in order to make them disappear but that's just a matter of our personal preference.

  15. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes shooting the undersides etc. using a different color would work fine. We normally shoot the undersides of the fenders etc with black Zero Rust in order to make them disappear but that's just a matter of our personal preference.
    that's what i do too, i like the black inner fender as it makes the wheels pop. i know however, there's a trend for guys doing restoration to shoot body color in there, maybe just so people see that it's been worked on i guess. i don't know if the hot rod guys are doing that too though, i'm kind of out of touch with that crowd unfortunately.
    b marler

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