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Thread: Bike tank repair (dents)

  1. #31
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Len,

    Found a cpl of you tube videos on this tool where they pulled small and large dents/dings, see link below. What they referred to as large dent or ding has me wondering about the limits of the tool. If you or anybody else has tried the Shoot Suit ding/dent puller can you give me an idea of it's limits? I would think you wouldn't want to pull a dent where the expanded outer metal protrudes outside and beyond the cone correct? What if there were a tight crease in the dent, although unusual it does happen? Lastly, for classic cars that typically have a larger gauge sheet metal will it still perform? The video demo shows it pulls at 1000 lbs. so I'm guessing it shouldn't be a problem. Any more info would be great, I can certainly see this tool being in my arsenal! Thanks again Len for showing me this tool, think I may need one of these.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri67QRpZ0hg
    I was thinking that it might work well with the stud (pin) going through the plate might be a great idea because it would hold the plate against the surface while pulling out the ding. Plus as far as tools go it's fairly inexpensive.... $35

  2. #32
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    Dec 2015
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    Default Great idea

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    I was thinking that it might work well with the stud (pin) going through the plate might be a great idea because it would hold the plate against the surface while pulling out the ding. Plus as far as tools go it's fairly inexpensive.... $35
    Len,

    Had not thought of that, again great idea. Just ordered it from you. When it comes in I'll give this a shot and post. Thanks again

  3. #33
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    Nov 2013
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    i'm curious about the construction of that tool. is the nose piece made of plastic? it seems like it's pretty much a rivet gun with a cone shaped attachment. is that about right? it seems like a great idea, and one i might adapt to my hydraulic rivet gun.
    b marler

  4. #34
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i'm curious about the construction of that tool. is the nose piece made of plastic? it seems like it's pretty much a rivet gun with a cone shaped attachment. is that about right? it seems like a great idea, and one i might adapt to my hydraulic rivet gun.
    bmarler,

    I think your right on all accounts. I considered adapting my air or hand rivet gun but after thinking about it, that would probably be a disaster with the air riveter by over pulling and loss of control. However, that doesn't mean it isn't worth a shot on a scrap piece, be a fun test and you always learn something.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    Len,

    Had not thought of that, again great idea. Just ordered it from you. When it comes in I'll give this a shot and post. Thanks again
    It's on it's way.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    i'm curious about the construction of that tool. is the nose piece made of plastic? it seems like it's pretty much a rivet gun with a cone shaped attachment. is that about right? it seems like a great idea, and one i might adapt to my hydraulic rivet gun.
    I don't know what it's made of because I don't have one here. I have them drop shipped from one of my supplying warehouses. The one going to Ron is shipping out of Dallas.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    bmarler,

    I think your right on all accounts. I considered adapting my air or hand rivet gun but after thinking about it, that would probably be a disaster with the air riveter by over pulling and loss of control. However, that doesn't mean it isn't worth a shot on a scrap piece, be a fun test and you always learn something.
    agreed. i wouldn't try it with an air riveter for the same reasons as you. but my hydraulic one has incredible control and i think it would work very well. since len can't comment on the materials of construction as he doesn't have one on hand, maybe you could report when yours arrives. if the nose seems strong enough and the i.d. of the cone is a reasonable fit i might hit len up for one too.
    b marler

  7. #37
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    It's on it's way.



    I don't know what it's made of because I don't have one here. I have them drop shipped from one of my supplying warehouses. The one going to Ron is shipping out of Dallas.
    I'll give a shout when it comes in. I'm guessing the cone is maybe ABS as metal might be harsh on the surface. Thanks Len for the quick order.

  8. #38
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    Mar 2016
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    432

    Default Why not cut and weld?

    It looks to me like the stud gun and the plate with the hole in it or Len's modified rivet tool would be a good solution for people like me that are more of a "Grinder" than a "Welder".

    But Nitro has stated that he is an expert welder and knows how to TIG (yes I am jealous!), so I don't know why he wouldn't just cut it open, clean the rust out, body work it and reweld.

  9. #39
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmarler View Post
    agreed. i wouldn't try it with an air riveter for the same reasons as you. but my hydraulic one has incredible control and i think it would work very well. since len can't comment on the materials of construction as he doesn't have one on hand, maybe you could report when yours arrives. if the nose seems strong enough and the i.d. of the cone is a reasonable fit i might hit len up for one too.
    bmarler,

    I will absolutely give a heads up. I have a few panels in the shop now (66' goat) I am anxious to see how well it does on. It should be a great test from the heavier ga. S/M on a classic. If it cannot handle the thicker ga. (which I think it can) I'll do like you and make a nosed piece for my heavy pull hydraulic rivet tool. Will be fun to play with.

  10. #40
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    Dec 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    It looks to me like the stud gun and the plate with the hole in it or Len's modified rivet tool would be a good solution for people like me that are more of a "Grinder" than a "Welder".

    But Nitro has stated that he is an expert welder and knows how to TIG (yes I am jealous!), so I don't know why he wouldn't just cut it open, clean the rust out, body work it and reweld.
    oldfatbald,

    I get the feeling from his posts he is trying to keep this as original as possible, i.e. a no filler repair, sorta like working on a survivor car maybe? So "I think" he is trying to keep it as original as possible, all the while gaining some experience with this type of repair. At least that was my take and I have done repairs on survivors where I didn't want to get overly ambitious as to leave everything as original as possible. Besides, what a great challenge to repair that way. As he is already an professional tig welder there wouldn't be much challenge in a cut, dolly, tig and grind. I love his type of challenge, takes away some of the mundane part of the repair.
    On another note, I think you need to get yourself a tig setup and start playing. I know you want too and there are plenty of us here to help you get started! You won't be disappointed.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    432

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    oldfatbald,
    ...On another note, I think you need to get yourself a tig setup and start playing. I know you want too and there are plenty of us here to help you get started! You won't be disappointed.
    Ron, That is funny as I do have a little Eastwood tig setup and I do want to learn how to use it (correctly). Right now, it is as new as the day that I received it as I have yet to use it, it is all setup and ready to go. I keep telling myself that I will practice with it during the winter.

    I use my Miller 211 a lot (then grind!) but just kind of walk by that little tig…. I need someone like yourself or Nitro to move closer to where I live!!!!

  12. #42
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    Dec 2015
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    Default Tig welding

    Quote Originally Posted by OldFatBald View Post
    Ron, That is funny as I do have a little Eastwood tig setup and I do want to learn how to use it (correctly). Right now, it is as new as the day that I received it as I have yet to use it, it is all setup and ready to go. I keep telling myself that I will practice with it during the winter.

    I use my Miller 211 a lot (then grind!) but just kind of walk by that little tig…. I need someone like yourself or Nitro to move closer to where I live!!!!
    I hear ya buddy. However, I have to challenge you to pick up that stinger and start practicing. As you already know when it comes to welding....practice, practice, hell you know the drill. Why not just pull it up and start, you obviously know there are people to help you and you have the desire. I have been welding for 40+ years as well as rebuilding/restoring the pipeline welders for a few decades (mainly the Lincoln SA200 and Miller big 40's with the Continental engines), there is nothing more satisfying than picking up that stinger and doing your own work. We can have you welding dimes in no time (might be a bit of exaggeration but you know what I mean).

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Greenville Sc
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    19

    Default

    I just used a standard rivet gun to pull the dent. If the section was flat instead of curved, a flat plate instead of a pipe would be used. I found a standard rivet would work also. I'm surprised this technique isn't used more?

    I'm tied up in a few other projects but will get back to it next.



    .
    Rivgun2.jpg

    Rivgun23.jpg

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    269

    Default Shoot Suit pin puller

    I got the Shoot Suit weld pin puller in yesterday from Len (wow, really quick shipping Len thanks) and played with it for a few hours. NitroShark, on your question of technique not being thought of before, my guess would be PDR. Can't remember exactly when PDR repair came into play but it seems ding and/or shallow dent repair technology fell off when PDR was introduced on the lighter ga. sheet metal for modern cars, but I'm just guessing.

    On the Shoot Suit welded pin puller, I can't imagine a production shop not having one of these in their tool box. They are easy, quick and semi-efficient and do a great job. I say semi-efficient in that it takes a few extra weld on pins and pulls to get the small dent, again quarter size, level to surface (if used just like it is out of the package). In my opinion I think a single pin and pull on most quarter size or smaller dents, followed by filler is the best option for a production shop. However, I am not a professional working in a shop where I have to manage time, materials, customers, etc., so I'll leave that determination to the professionals.

    I tested the puller on 18 ga. sheet metal as I only work on Classic muscle cars between 1930's and early 70's where the sheet metal is of higher gauge, yep I'm spoiled! What I concluded was exactly as NitroShark stated earlier, "If the section was flat instead of curved, a flat plate instead of a pipe would be used" see previous post/pics by NitroShark where he pulled a tank dent using rivet gun, tig rod and .5 pipe(?)

    Pic of Shoot Suit puller with cone attached. Puller feels of heavy gauge metal with an ABS cone attached in front.
    1-post.jpg1-post.jpg1-post.jpg

    I made several dents in the 18 ga. ready for pin pulling
    2 - start dent.jpg

    Using the Shoot Suit right out of the package with cone attached while using a single pin and pull here are the results
    3 -using tool as in tended.jpg

    Using Shoot Suit without cone while pulling against .250 plate (reverse dolly)
    4 -using plate to pull.jpg
    Results, impressive and best results
    5 -pull with plate finish.jpg

    I was hoping to do a dent pull using cone against .250 plate, however in this configuration the pull pin was too short for the Shoot Suit to get a grip. So I used tig rod to accomplish this test.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    269

    Default Shoot Suit puylling with tig rod

    Lastly, I pulled similar dent using tig rod with nose cone attached and threaded through .250 plate.
    6 -finished tig pull.jpg

    Overall I am very impressed with this tool. It has unbelievable pulling power with great control. If this weld on pin puller came with 3 to 5 extra size nose cones (both smaller and larger) for different size dings and dents it would be unbelievable! So, guess what I am developing? And, just as NitroShark stated if you have a reverse dolly that can conform to the dents contour it is truly a win. I will be doing more experimenting with this tool utilizing different dollies as time allows.

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