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Thread: Welding a patch piece into a fender ?s.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    295

    Default Welding a patch piece into a fender ?s.

    What is the best procedure? Do I leave a small gap, 0.04" or butt weld it? Also thinking of using 0.023" wire. 0808191851.jpg0629191751.jpg

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,135

    Default

    I did a lot of work in the past fixing small dings on fenders and finally realized that fenders are so cheap that I replace them now any time I can get a new one from Certifit.

    To answer your question, yes .023 wire is what you need for sheet metal. It cuts down on the amount of heat needed to melt the wire and makes the heat affected area on the panel as small as possible. Butt welding or having a small gap (same as wire thickness) seems to work the same for me. A big gap requires you to dwell on the spot a little longer and put more heat in that area.

    Bob K

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    45,318

    Default

    I'm assuming that you can't purchase an aftermarket fender and if so I think I'd straighten it rather than patch it. What kind of car is it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    19,134

    Default Repair?

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    What is the best procedure? Do I leave a small gap, 0.04" or butt weld it? Also thinking of using 0.023" wire. 0629191751.jpg

    Thanks.
    (I left the picture with the damage.)

    If mine, I would take that fender off and enjoy a repair and make it fit as it should with a minimal of filler. I've, in the past, repaired things like that on the car but it is close to the windshield.

    This is that 2 door good looking car you showed us a little while ago, yes?

    Henry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    295

    Default

    Well, used fenders are about $125.00 each, plus the drive, certifit are about $80.00 each, plus a 5 hr drive round trip. This repair for the most part is my time, the patch panels were free. I have tried repairing that area, it has been a pain in the a$$, the metal is torn and stretched. Plus there is a trim piece that goes on the arch of the fender. I feel it would be faster and easier for me to patch it in, and I'm still learning a repair process. Now if I screw 1 one up, there is the passenger side close to me for $80.00.

    Henry, yes it's project Bad Decision, I will be making an update soon.

    Chad.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,090

    Default Patch panel

    To repair this, the fender will have to come off to properly weld, dolly and finish (I'm sure you already knew this).

    Trim your patch panel to size by overlaying it on top of the area to be repaired and snug it up tight. Clamp or Cleco in place and cut through patch panel and existing fender at the same time. Width of cutting wheel will give you the gap you need to properly align and weld this in place. Below are a few pointers and photos of a tail pan I repaired and license plate frenched in on my 36' coupe. I always cover welded area with SS fiber filler followed by body filler and primer.

    1. Use lowest welder setting possible to obtain a GOOD PENETRATING weld
    2. Ping every tack
    3. Tack stitching needs wide spacing between tacks to aid in metal distortion.
    4. Stop occasionally and check fender fit, when needed dolly and hammer to keep fender shape.
    5. Start by pinging every weld until you get the feel of the material, you can then do 2 to 3 spaced tacks before pinging if the metal will allow it for shrinkage
    6. Old sheet metal can and will blow through faster than new metal, so I use a dolly wrapped in copper sheeting for an heat sink to help draw some of the heat away from metal
    7. .023 wire would be proper for this repair.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    19,134

    Default Show me!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronf View Post
    To repair this, the fender will have to come off to properly weld, dolly and finish (I'm sure you already knew this).

    Trim your patch panel to size by overlaying it on top of the area to be repaired and snug it up tight. Clamp or Cleco in place and cut through patch panel and existing fender at the same time. Width of cutting wheel will give you the gap you need to properly align and weld this in place. Below are a few pointers and photos of a tail pan I repaired and license plate frenched in on my 36' coupe. I always cover welded area with SS fiber filler followed by body filler and primer.

    1. Use lowest welder setting possible to obtain a GOOD PENETRATING weld
    2. Ping every tack
    3. Tack stitching needs wide spacing between tacks to aid in metal distortion.
    4. Stop occasionally and check fender fit, when needed dolly and hammer to keep fender shape.
    5. Start by pinging every weld until you get the feel of the material, you can then do 2 to 3 spaced tacks before pinging if the metal will allow it for shrinkage
    6. Old sheet metal can and will blow through faster than new metal, so I use a dolly wrapped in copper sheeting for an heat sink to help draw some of the heat away from metal
    7. .023 wire would be proper for this repair.
    And that's exactly what you did. Really nice picture instruction of "show me" for many to learn from along with reading your 7 step process.

    I just love what this site has and is doing for so many for so many years!

    Henry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    19,134

    Default POC!

    Quote Originally Posted by SStampede View Post
    Well, used fenders are about $125.00 each, plus the drive, certifit are about $80.00 each, plus a 5 hr drive round trip. This repair for the most part is my time, the patch panels were free. I have tried repairing that area, it has been a pain in the a$$, the metal is torn and stretched. Plus there is a trim piece that goes on the arch of the fender. I feel it would be faster and easier for me to patch it in, and I'm still learning a repair process. Now if I screw 1 one up, there is the passenger side close to me for $80.00.

    Henry, yes it's project Bad Decision, I will be making an update soon.

    Chad.
    POC = Piece Of Cake! (Humps, hurdles, challenges & more) BUT...

    You were fighting against the tide on this one from the start. I've been there plenty of times. It becomes (if you let it) take over your mind. Wake up and it hits you - oh yeah, that car.

    If that fender is that annoying, then make a decision of what to do about it. For most of us, without actually being there to see and touch that piece, it's hard to say what to do. My first inkling was to repair it but if you feel that's not an option then choose another option.

    (Look at it this way too - you have a dented edge on the fender with torn metal. On the other hand, you still have the same fender with a new piece of metal that you would need to form into exact shape and weld into place. That would further induce me to straighten and weld the damage you have now because at least the basic outline is there - if you follow)

    You can also think of who might get these parts delivered to them in your area. Maybe schmooze up to or with a shop to order the part for you, get it and you pay them plus 10% (beats a 5 hour drive).

    Other things I've done in similar spots. Go to one of the three bone yards I go to with my saws all and cut that part of the fender off of something in the yard WHERE say the front of the fender has already been hit. Normally, they don't care about what I cut off of some part already with too much damage for them to sell. (Again, if you follow me.)

    Think outside the box. Who can I ask? What do I need to do (most important to least).

    Listen, when I bought a few too many and had a glut at home, my wife was not the happiest to see another come home. Then one day my father told her (I didn't know this), you know you seem to get upset with his growing car lot. Funny, I never hear you complain when he sells one or more and has a "fist full of dollars".)

    Oh and don't doubt yourself. You did the Equinox and faced many new challenges there and that turned out great. This one will too or always have it for sale as you work on it. We only get one day at a time. Use each one wisely. You'll get there and you know you will. Later!

    Henry

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