TheCoatingStore.com

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 44

Thread: Painting my 67 GTO

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Painting my 67 GTO

    I've heard that epoxy primer over bare metal is the way to go. Problem for me is that I don't own a compressor & the metal rusts quickly. I sprayed some sections with standard Rustoleum primer from spray cans. Can I sand this down and apply a urethane 2K primer over it? Anyone know if that will work?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madgrocer13 View Post
    I've heard that epoxy primer over bare metal is the way to go. Problem for me is that I don't own a compressor & the metal rusts quickly. I sprayed some sections with standard Rustoleum primer from spray cans. Can I sand this down and apply a urethane 2K primer over it? Anyone know if that will work?
    Thanks
    If I didn't have a compressor I'd use SprayMax Primer in an aerosol can for a good quality job.

    Last edited by Len; 06-15-2019 at 02:37 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    14,790

    Default

    On my 67 GTO I sprayed PPG epoxy (DP90) direct to metal and followed with K-36 high build primer. This was 11-12 years ago and it held up well. If you don't own a compressor you could probably rent one. Spend $20-$30 and get a cheap harbor freight gun which will work fine for primer. In my opinion the money would be well spent.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    14,790

    Default

    Also, get rid of that rustoleum.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Question

    Quote Originally Posted by carcrazy View Post
    On my 67 GTO I sprayed PPG epoxy (DP90) direct to metal and followed with K-36 high build primer. This was 11-12 years ago and it held up well. If you don't own a compressor you could probably rent one. Spend $20-$30 and get a cheap harbor freight gun which will work fine for primer. In my opinion the money would be well spent.
    Do I need to go down to the metal if the paint surface is in good shape? Can I wet sand after sanding with say, 80 grit to smooth it out.

    Also, I've read you can't sand the epoxy. Is that true & if so does that mean you sand the K-36?

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madgrocer13 View Post
    Do I need to go down to the metal if the paint surface is in good shape? Can I wet sand after sanding with say, 80 grit to smooth it out.

    Also, I've read you can't sand the epoxy. Is that true & if so does that mean you sand the K-36?

    Thanks
    In most cases you can apply your epoxy then apply your next coating within the epoxy's recoat window. If you've allowed the epoxy to dry beyond the recoat window you would need to sand it prior to recoating.

    Sanding with 80 is too coarse for most applications. If I were going to apply a filler primer over epoxy and had to sand the epoxy I'd sand with 180 or 220.

    If the existing finish is in good shape you should be able to scuff it and apply your topcoat. Be sure to clean it well with some grease and wax remover before and after sanding.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    14,790

    Default

    Some brands of epoxy sand well. Some, like PPG DP, can be sanded but no fun. As I remember the recoat time is about a week. The K-36 is a high build primer that is easy to sand. This is the product you block sand to get those nice straight panels. Really critical on the 67 quarters. Can't tell you how many 67's I see with really nice paint but wavy quarters.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    In most cases you can apply your epoxy then apply your next coating within the epoxy's recoat window. If you've allowed the epoxy to dry beyond the recoat window you would need to sand it prior to recoating.

    Sanding with 80 is too coarse for most applications. If I were going to apply a filler primer over epoxy and had to sand the epoxy I'd sand with 180 or 220.

    If the existing finish is in good shape you should be able to scuff it and apply your topcoat. Be sure to clean it well with some grease and wax remover before and after sanding.
    Can give me some details on "scuff it"? And...are you saying that I can apply my finish coast directly over the scuffed paint? I'm a true rookie.
    Thanks

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madgrocer13 View Post
    Can give me some details on "scuff it"? And...are you saying that I can apply my finish coast directly over the scuffed paint? I'm a true rookie.
    Thanks
    Yes, if you want to paint directly over existing paint you need to give the surface a sanding so that the new paint adheres and doesn't peel off after a couple months. We normally use and recommend sanding with 400 grit sandpaper if it's going to be a solid color and 600 if it's a metallic color.

    Before you sand you should use grease and wax remover to clean the surface. You can do this by folding a paper towel into quarters then wetting it with the solvent cleaner (not thinner or reducer) wipe over the surface to wet it then dry it using a new/clean paper towel. Do about three or four square feet at a time, wipe it dry and move on to the next area. When it's all been cleaned start your sanding.

    After sanding blow the dust off the surface and out of the cracks then mask and re-clean with grease and wax remover.

    Right before you start spraying use a TACK CLOTH to lightly wipe the surface to remove the last bit of dust.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Yes, if you want to paint directly over existing paint you need to give the surface a sanding so that the new paint adheres and doesn't peel off after a couple months. We normally use and recommend sanding with 400 grit sandpaper if it's going to be a solid color and 600 if it's a metallic color.

    Before you sand you should use grease and wax remover to clean the surface. You can do this by folding a paper towel into quarters then wetting it with the solvent cleaner (not thinner or reducer) wipe over the surface to wet it then dry it using a new/clean paper towel. Do about three or four square feet at a time, wipe it dry and move on to the next area. When it's all been cleaned start your sanding.

    After sanding blow the dust off the surface and out of the cracks then mask and re-clean with grease and wax remover.

    Right before you start spraying use a TACK CLOTH to lightly wipe the surface to remove the last bit of dust.
    Where I hit bare metal, do I use a self etching primer? I've all ready used standard Rustoleum primer on the hood & the trunk. What do you recommend I do with them. & thanks a bunch for your help.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madgrocer13 View Post
    Where I hit bare metal, do I use a self etching primer? I've all ready used standard Rustoleum primer on the hood & the trunk. What do you recommend I do with them. & thanks a bunch for your help.
    I've never used Rustoleum primer so I don't know it's variables. On bare metal I'd use either etch primer or epoxy primer.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    14,790

    Default

    I've never used Rustoleum on anything automotive I cared about. Myself, I'd strip it off if for no other reason than to avoid the possibilities of any reaction with other paints. If you are thinking about leaving it on, you may wish to talk to some of the paint rep to get opinions as to suitability. Automotive paints are expensive, hate to have a "do over." You should post some pictures of you car if you get a minute so we can see what you are working with. As I've owned a few of these cars over the last 45 years (including an original ram air) I know where the bodies are buried on these.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Update

    Quote Originally Posted by carcrazy View Post
    I've never used Rustoleum on anything automotive I cared about. Myself, I'd strip it off if for no other reason than to avoid the possibilities of any reaction with other paints. If you are thinking about leaving it on, you may wish to talk to some of the paint rep to get opinions as to suitability. Automotive paints are expensive, hate to have a "do over." You should post some pictures of you car if you get a minute so we can see what you are working with. As I've owned a few of these cars over the last 45 years (including an original ram air) I know where the bodies are buried on these.
    Pictures coming Tuesday 6/18. Here;s where I am with this. Going to sand dry down the primer with 80 or 120. Wipe down with cleaner until no signs of residue. Paint with self etching primer. Then follow up with 3 coats filling primer. Then start cutting/ How does that sound?
    Thanks

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    45,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madgrocer13 View Post
    Pictures coming Tuesday 6/18. Here;s where I am with this. Going to sand dry down the primer with 80 or 120. Wipe down with cleaner until no signs of residue. Paint with self etching primer. Then follow up with 3 coats filling primer. Then start cutting/ How does that sound?
    Thanks
    80/120 is pretty coarse, I usually don't prime over anything more coarse than 180. Be sure to guide coat the primer before block sanding.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    18

    Default Question

    What does that mean? Guide Coat
    Thanks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •