TheCoatingStore.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Russian salvage car rebuild videos

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    17

    Default Russian salvage car rebuild videos

    I just came across these videos from a guy in Russia that rebuilds late model wrecks that I don't think anyone in the states would bother with. Now I understand why prices are so high at Copart and IAA for stuff that seems beyond repair.

    Few examples:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0weGifzv6Y

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wR2f-q4WPfs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBryZaK9Qzc

    Would anyone even attempt to rebuild any of those here?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    12,674

    Default Great!!!

    Thank you for the links. I love the guy! The only thing missing was the VODKA.

    One car was 70 hours, another was 27 days.

    When he said he was done and giving them back to the customer, I imagine it meant to shops that had him get them ready for paint and final finish.

    NOTE: I wish we had 'dent puller welders' like he used in the last video at 19:00 (lower quarter crease in the 2dr BMW) Best we have is a stud welder.

    Who could afford to pay for all this work?

    Another thing, being in a foreign country, are the airbags needed or not replaced?

    We have some DP 'Pollocks' who run a couple shops locally with the same work ethic and fix ANYTHING. No part(s) are discarded.

    Very impressive guy with a lot of talent. I would love to have him in my own shop. Just leave him alone and let him have at it.

    I watched all 3 videos. I think it was insane to repair those cars but was, at the same time, impressed all the way!

    Thanks for sharing those.

    Henry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I don't know what the labor rate in Russia is, but it must be a bit less than here. Do people living near the southern border in Texas and California still take their cars to Mexico for major bodywork? And I know a few Africans that buy cars here and ship them. One of them said they do bodywork on the boat for basically $1 an hour. Not sure how true that is though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    lower Michigan
    Posts
    23,003

    Default

    While I admire the guys ability to repair totals like that the big problem is those cars aren't safe to be put back on the road. The structural metal he is pulling back out on the frame machine is irrevocably fatigued with hard spots and soft spots as well as very weak spots where the metal was pushed together. Those cars new have undergone many crash tests to make sure the occupants of those cars can survive a collision that would total the car. There are "crumple zones" designed into the structure where metal will absorb an impact and fold to reduce the damage to the operator station. When that metal is damaged and pulled back on a frame machine the metal has lost it's ability to do what it was designed to do --- to protect the occupants of the vehicle in a crash.

    Like I said -- That Russian "repairing" structural damage might look cool -- the car is not safe. If that car is in another accident people could die as a direct result of "repairing" structural sheet metal damage.

    I believe the other well experienced pro's here will agree with me. What say you, Brian ? And the other pro's here ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,345

    Default

    coming from amateur like me, i agree with you, Philv, on this side of forum only,bregarding futire possible vehicle safety crush zone failures..

    however , Arthur is a world class metal worker, meticulate, precise, ingenious, a true proffesional in how he does things with what he has and and up to what motor vehicle safety procedures he repairs those cars..

    i love how he works, there is not many people that are able to fix cars likr he does...

    but i would not buy one of those heavily damaged and fixed cars ....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,345

    Default

    Here in Ontario, a lot of guys buy smashed up or old vehicles and send them to Russia and formernRussian states and Africa and they fix them and make profit....mostly Japanesr and Nazi cars

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    12,674

    Default Hmmmmm...

    I watched all 3 videos and was surprised to see Arthur didn't rip or tear the metal he was pulling. Where he pulled against the wood helped but where he put hooks on the metal did not tear.

    All his pulls worked be it a welded on hook or MO CLAMP.

    BRIAN: Hoping Brian will chime in or TYPICALCARGUY because they were saying a couple months back that you can't do sectioning or clip as we used to due to the build process. HOWEVER, it was also because of standards of repair but again, those are AMERICAN standards, many set by insurance companies. (Thus my question on the airbags.)

    Twenty+ years ago, you could have cut the car at the A Pillar and across the floor about 6 - 8 inches in front of the driver seat and 'clipped' it with another car.

    I concur with Phil because metal has a stretch to it and the strength will never be as it was when the piece was first made. The rigidity just will not be there.

    Henry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    273

    Default

    True what PhilV and others said. But these guys do have a lot of talent.

  9. #9
    typicalcarguy Guest

    Default

    Phil I agree with you 110% the oems come up with repair procedures by doing their own crash testing,insurance companies have nothing to do with this.None of us know more than the engineers,the industry right now is in a sad state because of bodymen who have done repairs the same way for the last 40 years.we all need to continually educate ourselves with training. Arthur Is a talented guy but theses repairs are not safe even tho they are amazing to watch.This video with industry leaders explains why his cars are not safe.lots of information on collision hub!


    https://youtu.be/lEUtWbPJh3k

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    olympia,wa
    Posts
    795

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil V View Post
    While I admire the guys ability to repair totals like that the big problem is those cars aren't safe to be put back on the road. The structural metal he is pulling back out on the frame machine is irrevocably fatigued with hard spots and soft spots as well as very weak spots where the metal was pushed together. Those cars new have undergone many crash tests to make sure the occupants of those cars can survive a collision that would total the car. There are "crumple zones" designed into the structure where metal will absorb an impact and fold to reduce the damage to the operator station. When that metal is damaged and pulled back on a frame machine the metal has lost it's ability to do what it was designed to do --- to protect the occupants of the vehicle in a crash.

    Like I said -- That Russian "repairing" structural damage might look cool -- the car is not safe. If that car is in another accident people could die as a direct result of "repairing" structural sheet metal damage.

    I believe the other well experienced pro's here will agree with me. What say you, Brian ? And the other pro's here ?
    not a pro anymore but...
    spot on. modern cars just can't be repaired like that. they're designed as a "whole" structure, all parts working together to protect the passengers.
    lots of different alloys in strategic locations all working together. once you've altered the grain structure of the metal the physical properties aren't the same anymore. if you can't repair according to factory guidelines it's a total.
    that said, i could use people with that kind of talent. just not repairing cars...i'm sure he could be re-trained.
    b marler

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,345

    Default

    i just saw a video where those experts or whatever they are bashing and ridiculing Arthurs work, equipment and skilss....


    even mimicking some language...


    i would take Arthur and his knowledge over all of them together to repair my car...

  12. #12
    typicalcarguy Guest

    Default

    Bau bau with all due respect you donít know what your talking about.Google Larry montanez ,he owns mid island collision,P@l consulting,writes articles for many industry publications does numerous hands on training courses etc. All of the know what they are talking about ,it is a 3rd world repair. They said some good things about him ,like if he had the proper training etc.glorifying this repair is sad

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Wouldn't exactly call it third world. If the car owner is happy that they got their car fixed for a lot less than what it would have cost at a regular shop, I don't see a problem. That it's less safe than a job done to manufacturers specs, maybe, but it's pure speculation how much less safe that is. If you want to see 3rd world repairs, look at the following, and those look pretty decent as well.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GH_3dJFNbdE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X5rvrTLipA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WntKUz1miNs

  14. #14
    typicalcarguy Guest

    Default

    It is a 3rd world repair,which means you don’t have the proper tools ,parts ,techniques to do the job properly.The car is unsafe period, bmw engineers spend time and money using procedures and crash test them to see what is safe and what isn’t.This car wasn’t fixed for a customer,it came out of New York from copart and went to Russia. Arthur fixes salvage and sells it. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand all of the passive restraint systems and the metal itself will not react as it was intended in an accident. Just because it “looks good “ does not mean it’s right.

    Is he talented? Yes
    Are his videos entertaining? Yes
    Would I want him fixing my car? No

    This guy is an internet sensation and everybody loves him but call a spade a spade.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    17

    Default

    If I had to guess, I'd say seat belts and airbags are 75% of the safety factor in a car today and the structure may be 25%. If that guy's repairs reduce the structural integrity by half, the car is still 87.5% as safe as before the wreck. I'd be fine with that for anything I drove.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •